Dictionary of Poker Terminology

Able


An obsolete term for the player immediately to the left of the dealer in games that use an automatic betting scheme. Also called edge, elder hand, or eldest hand. Sometimes the player in that position is the last to bet before the draw, which is equivalent to the situation involving an under-the-gun blind.

According to Hoyle


With respect to the rules of poker, proper; a vague phrase invoking authority.

Ace


The highest or lowest card in the deck. If the cards are arranged in order, the ace either starts this sequence: A-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-T-J-Q-K; or finishes this one: 2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-T-J-Q-K-A. In high poker, the ace is the highest card in a hand, with one exception: when it is part of a 5-high straight, that is, in this hand: A-2-3-4-5, of mixed suits.

Ace in the Hole


In a stud game, having an ace as a down card. Having a hidden advantage.

Ace Out


To win (perhaps by bluffing) while holding an ace high hand (that is, a relatively worthless hand, since it doesn't contain even a pair). This phrase passed into general usage with the meaning of winning by deception or just barely beating someone. (If your opponent holds a totally worthless hand, an ace-high hand would just barely beat him; that is, you would ace him out.)

Ace to Five


In a game played for low, ace to five means straights and flushes don't count and the ace can be used as a low card. The best possible hand in an ace to five game is therefore A2345 (often called a wheel).

Ace Up the Sleeve


Describes a situation in which a cheater has withdrawn an ace from the deck to be introduced into the game later, or, more generally, has taken some unfair advantage. The phrase has passed into general usage to describe a situation in which someone has a hidden (though not necessarily unfair) advantage.

Ace-High


A five-card hand containing an ace but no pair; beats a king-high, but loses to any pair or above.

Ace-High Straight Flush


A royal flush.

Acepots


A form of high draw poker, in which a player cannot open the pot without holding at least two aces as openers.

Aces and Spaces


A five-card hand consisting of two aces and three other worthless cards.

Aces Full


A full house with aces over any pair.

Aces Over


1) Pairs, one of which is aces. 2) A full house with aces over any pair.

Aces Up


Pairs, one of which is aces.

Ace-to-Five Draw


In a game played for low, ace to five means straights and flushes don't count and the ace can be used as a low card. The best possible hand in an ace to five game is therefore A2345 (often called a wheel).

Ace-to-Five Lowball


In a game played for low, ace to five means straights and flushes don't count and the ace can be used as a low card. The best possible hand in an ace to five game is therefore A2345 (often called a wheel).

Acey-Deucey


1) Two pairs, aces and deuces. 2) In hold 'em, A-2 as one's first two cards. 3) A non-poker game, usually played in home games, but also found rarely in casinos, in which players bet that a third card in succession will fall in rank between the first two, which are dealt face up before the bet. Sometimes called Red Dog.

Acey-Uppy


Pairs, one of which is aces.

Act


To do something when it's your turn, one of: check, call, fold, open bet, and raise.

Action


1) The relative liveliness of a game, often measured by the frequency and quantity of bets and raises. "This game has a lot of action." Often part of the phrase fast action. 2) Being required to act. When it's your turn to do something, someone might say, "It's your action," or, "The action is up to you." 3) That portion of the pot that a player short of the full bet can win a multiple of. In a no-limit game, if John bets $100, Jim calls the whole $100, and you call, but you have only $20, you are said to have $20 worth of action in the pot. A side pot of $160 will be created between John and Jim; $20 of John's bet goes into the main pot, as does $20 of Jim's bet, and all of your bet; you can win the $60 main pot if you win.

Action Button


A bet that must be posted, in a seven-card stud high-low game, by the winner of a scoop pot above a certain size, signifying a full bet (a blind raise, in other words), rather than just a call of the original forced bet. Any player who acts before the action button can only call the bring-in. The holder of the action button essentially raises blind, and then, when it gets back to those who have only so far called the opening bet, they can either call or raise.

Action Only


In many card rooms, with respect to an all-in bet, only a full bet is considered a legitimate wager, in terms of whether this constitutes a raise that can be re-raised. Anything less than a full bet is considered to be action only, that is, other players can call such a bet but not raise it.

Active


Still in contention for a pot. "Before the draw, there were five people in the pot; after the draw, there were three active players."

Active Hand


A hand still in contention for a pot.

Active Player


A player who is still in the pot.

Add-on


The opportunity to buy additional chips in some tournaments. Some tournaments allow players the opportunity at a certain point to buy additional chips, called an add- on. This is different from a re-buy, because usually anyone still in the tournament can add on, and the opportunity to add-on usually marks the end of the re-buy period. I was in such bad chip position, I decided it wasn't worth paying for the add-on.

Advantage


Same as edge (An advantage over an opponent, either specific or subjective.).

Advantage Player


A thief or cheater, that is, someone who wins by taking an advantage.

Advantage Tool


A cheating device, as a marked card or a mechanical device for hiding one or more cards, as, for example, a holdout machine.

Advertise


To make a bluff with the deliberate intention of being exposed as a loose player. Advertising usually means showing down a mediocre hand, to give the impression that you play overly loose or that you play a generally weak game. The idea is that other players will then give you more action when you make a legitimate hand. Since people are bad at revising first impressions, this potentially beneficial effect can be long-lasting. Typical advertising plays in hold'em might be to show down top pair with a weak kicker (e.g., K2), middle pair, or a gut shot draw that missed. These hands have marginal intrinsic value, but playing them early in a session might pay off later. Of course, it's best to advertise if you actually want to be called down more often, e.g., at an especially tight table. At a table full of calling stations, it might be unnecessary or even harmful. Advertising can also mean anything you do at the poker table to manipulate how other players assess you.

Advertisement


The act of advertising.

After-Hours Game


A private game, played after a card room closes for the night, often held in a motel or hotel room, and sometimes crooked.

A-Game


1) The highest-stakes game in a given establishment. Opposite of Z-game. 2) One's best game, in terms of the quality of one's play, as, "He's playing his A-game."

Age


An obsolete term for the player immediately to the left of the dealer in games that use an automatic betting scheme. Also called edge, elder hand, or eldest hand. Sometimes the player in that position is the last to bet before the draw, which is equivalent to the situation involving an under-the-gun blind.

Agent


The partner of a thief in a cheating scheme.

Aggressive


A style of play characterized by frequent raising and re-raising. This is not the same thing as loose play. Many good players are selective about the cards they will play, but aggressive once they get involved in a hand. An aggressive table is one dominated by aggressive players.

Ahead


1) Winning. "Are you ahead or behind?" 2) With regard to a reference position at the table, acting before (usually immediately before). If the deal is one position to your right, you are ahead of the deal. If a player is sitting to your right, he acts ahead of you.

Ainsworth


In hold'em, 6-2 as one's first two cards.

Air


1) In a lowball game, letting another player know whether you are going to draw cards or not, sometimes letting the player know how many, usually with the intention of getting that player into the pot. Usually part of the phrase give air. "Gimme some air. I'll draw two if you're drawing one." 2) Inadvertently exposing cards; usually part of the phrase put air into [a hand]. "You'll like sitting next to Johnny; he puts a lot of air into his hand." That is, if you sit next to Johnny, the way he holds his cards you can often see some of them, which, presumably, gives you an edge (albeit an unethical one) on him.

Ajax


In hold'em, A-J as one's first two cards. Also called foamy cleanser.

Alabama Night Riders


Three kings.

Alcohol.


I'll call.

Alexander


The king of clubs. Probably comes from Alexander the Great.

All ( Blue, Green, Purple, Etc. )


Colorful terms to describe a flush.

All Black


Having a spade or club flush. Also, all blue, all purple.

All Blue


Having a spade or club flush. Also, all black.

All Green


Having a flush. This term is used only by those who have played a lot in home games and not much in card-rooms.

All Pink


Having a heart or diamond flush. Also, all red.

All Purple


Having a spade or club flush. Also, all black, all blue.

All Red


Having a heart or diamond flush. Also, all pink.

All the Way


Betting all one's chips, usually preceded by go. "If I make this hand, I'm going all the way."

All the Way in One Play.


I'm betting all my chips.

All-in


To run out of chips while betting or calling. In table stakes games, a player may not go into his pocket for more money during a hand. If he runs out, a side pot is created in which he has no interest. However, he can still win the pot for which he had the chips.

All-in Bet


A bet made by a player in which he puts all his chips in the pot because he is all in.

Alone Player


A card thief working with no confederates.

Amc.


"All my chips." An announcement, usually in a no-limit game, on his turn that a player is betting or raising all of his chips.

American Airlines


In Hold'em, a pair of Aces in the hole. Also known as Pocket Rockets.

Ammo


Chips. "Houseman, I need more ammo" is a request for more chips.

Ammunition


Chips. "Houseman, I need more ammunition" is a request for more chips.

An Ace Working


An ace in hand.

Anaconda


A form of seven stud in which cards are passed to left and right, sometimes multiple times, and sometimes with five cards chosen at the end and rolled, that is, exposed one at a time. Also called pass the trash, Screwy Louie

Angle


Any technically legal but ethically dubious way to increase your expectation at a game; a trick.

Angle Shooter


A poker player who uses various underhanded, unfair methods to take advantage of inexperienced opponents. The difference between an angle shooter and a cheat is only a matter of degree. What a cheat or thief does is patently against the rules; what an angle shooter does may be marginally legal, but it's neither ethical nor gentlemanly. Nor is it in the spirit of the game. Unfortunately, poker is not a gentleman's game. In addition to learning how to protect yourself against cheating players, you must learn to watch out for the angle shooters.

Announce


In high/low games, declaring one's hand as high or low or both ways (usually done with chips in hand). Usually played in home games.

Announced Bet


A verbal declaration by a player, in turn, in a no-limit or spread game, of the amount of his bet, or, in other games, that he is betting. In games in which announced bets are permitted, they are usually binding (when made in turn).

Ante


1) One or more chips put into each pot by each player before the cards are dealt. An ante is not part of a player's next bet, as opposed to a blind, which usually is. 2) The player to the left of the dealer, usually in an ante and straddle game.

Ante and Straddle


A game in which the player to the left of the dealer (the ante) puts in (usually) one chip before getting any cards, and the player to his left (the straddle) puts in two chips. (Sometimes the dealer also puts in one chip.) The first player to have a choice on making a bet after having seen his cards is the player two positions to the left of the dealer. This is an old name for what is now called a two-blind traveling blind game. This is similar to a blind and straddle game. Also see little blind, middle blind, big blind.

Ante Bean


An ante, or a chip used to ante.

Ante Up


Put one's ante in the pot.

Ante Up.


A request, usually by the dealer, to one or more players to ante up.

Apologizer


Same as apology card.

Apology Card


In lowball, the appearance in the current hand of the card that would have made one's hand the previous hand.

Apple


Big game, often the biggest game in a particular club. "I lost $1000 in the apple today." Also, big apple.

Argine


The queen of clubs.

Arkansas Flush


Four-card flush.

Around-the-Corner Straight


In high draw poker, a special straight, a nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, five cards in a series in which the sequence of cards is considered to continue from king through ace, as, for example, J-Q-K-A-2. Sometimes the hand ranks between three of a kind and a "normal" straight; sometimes it ranks between a "normal" straight and a flush.

Artist


A cheat who manipulates the deck.

As Nas


An ancient Persian game that some say is an ancestor of poker.

Asian Five-Card Stud


A California game, a form of five-card stud played with a stripped deck.

Asian Games


The former name for California games. The term is still sometimes used in casinos and card-rooms.

Asian Stud


A California game, a form of five-card stud played with a stripped deck.

Assault Rifle


In Omaha, hole cards that are A-K-4-7 of any suit(s)

Assigned Bettor


The player who is first to bet in a particular round.

Auto Ante


This option determines if you have to manually ante on each new hand. Generally it is easier to let the computer ante for you, but it is more realistic to ante up yourself)

Automatic


Being in a must-bet situation.

Automatic Bet


A bet, often a bluff, made, regardless of one's cards, in a situation in which the bet usually wins.

Automatic Bluff


A bet, often a bluff, made, regardless of one's cards, in a situation in which the bet usually wins.

Ax


The percentage of a pot kept by the management to pay expenses; usually called drop.

B


The second position to the left of the dealer. Sometimes called just B.

Baby


A small card, usually a deuce through five in games other than lowball, and ace through five in lowball. "I caught a baby."

Back


1) Reverting to lowball, as in jacks back. 2) Finance another player.

Back Door Flush (Or Straight)


Catching a flush or straight using the last two cards dealt)

Back in


1) In a pass-and-back-in game, come into the pot after having passed. 2) Come into a pot cheaply as a result of having a blind and there not having been a raise.

Back into


1) Win a pot unexpectedly or by default.

Back Peek


A cheating maneuver that enables the dealer to see the face of the top card on the deck, accomplished by squeezing the top of the deck between thumb and little finger in such a way as to bow the top card in the middle so that its value can be surreptitiously viewed. This move is made prior to dealing seconds. Also called heel peek.

Back Raise


To make a small raise to prevent further or larger raises, when the number of raises in a betting interval is limited. Usually permitted only in home games, in which the rule that a raise must equal in size the previous bet or raise does not hold.

Back Seat


A position on a round of betting in which you act after most of the other players have acted.

Backdoor


Catching both the turn and river card to make a drawing hand. For instance, suppose you have As- 7s. The flop comes Ad-6c-4s. You bet and are called. The turn is the Ts, which everybody checks, and then the river is the Js. You've made a "backdoor" nut flush.

Backdoor Straight


Catching two cards to a straight.

Backed Up


1) Paired. "I have kings backed up" means, in a draw poker game, "I have one pair, kings." In hold 'em, wired. 2) In seven stud, having a pair in the hole.

Backer


Someone who finances another player. "How you gonna get into the tournament? I thought you were broke." "I have a backer."

Backing


The cash supplied by a backer (Someone who finances another player.). "How you gonna get into the tournament? I thought you were broke." "I have backing."

Backline


1) Make an agreement between two or more players to accumulate chips in the following manner. One of the players usually maintains the back line. Whenever he or the player with whom he has made the arrangement wins a pot, a certain portion of the chips in that pot are put on the back line, that is, in a pool for later distribution. That amount could be one chip for each pot. It could be some specified larger amount, perhaps five or 10 chips. In a limit game, it could also be one chip for each bet in the pot, or one for each bet won by the winner of the pot.

Backs


The reverse sides of the cards, as opposed to the sides that show their ranks and suits.

Back-to-Back


Serially, or in a row. "I drew two cards and caught back-to-back kings."

Bad


A hand of a particular type that will not beat many other hands of that type. Often used in low games to indicate non-nut low hands with a particular high card. A rough 8 in ace to five lowball could be any eight high hand other than 8432A, although 8532A isn't too rough. Rough is the opposite of smooth.

Bad Beat


A very good hand that is beat by a better hand that drew better cards at the end of the deal (see also backdoor).

Bad Game


Any game in which you figure to be the loser, because the other players are better than you.

Bad-Beat Jackpot


In some card-rooms, a prize that is shared by the players in a game, when a very good hand (usually Aces full, or better) is beaten by a higher hand. Jackpots are usually financed by taking a drop ($1 is a common amount) from every pot. A typical division of the jackpot will give the losing hand 50 %, the winning hand 25 %, and the other players at the table share the remaining 25 % of the Jackpot

Bad-Beat Story


A story told by someone who lost a pot, often a big one, in a bad beat. Usually no one but the teller is interested in hearing the story. The analog in the fishing world is the one that got away.

Bait


A small bet made to encourage a raise.

Baker


The second position to the left of the dealer. Sometimes called just B.

Balanced Games


The philosophy in some public card room that keeps two games of the same type at the same limit balanced with respect to the empty seats. Rather than one full game, and one short game, two games at the same limit would have the same number of empty seats. The rules that govern when and how players can move between such games vary from card room to card room.

Banana


Dollar; dollar chip.

Bank


Act as cashier, that is, sell and buy chips, usually in a private game. (The term has a different meaning in house-banked casino games.)

Banker


1) The player who sells and buys the chips, usually in a private game. This function is often fulfilled by the host of the game. 2) The player against whom all other players play in California games, analogous to the house in a casino.

Bankroll


1) (noun) One's playing capital, the total money one sets aside for gambling. 2) (verb) Put up the money for one or more players.

Bar


To prohibit someone from playing in a particular establishment.

Barbara Hutton


In hold 'em, 10-5 as one's first two cards.

Barn


A Full House, three of a kind and a pair.

Barnburner


Very good hand; likely a wheel in lowball or a high straight flush in high poker.

Base Dealer


A Bottom Dealer. A cheat who deals cards from the bottom of the deck. Also sometimes called b-dealer, subway dealer, or cellar dealer.

Baseball


Plays the same as Seven Card Stud except that in this game, threes and nines are wild, and a four up allows you to buy an extra card. If a player gets a four up, he has the option to buy an additional card for a predetermined amount, which is then dealt up. With eight wild and extra cards, it is usually fair to say, if you ain't got 'em, get out. That is unless you are dealt a natural royal flush. BEE No. 92 (TM) n. Trade name for the "diamond back" cards frequently used in casino games.

Basement


Bottom of the deck; usually preceded by from the. Usually refers to the move of a bottom dealer. "I saw him coming from the basement" means I saw him deal a card from the bottom of the deck.

Baskin-Robbins


In hold 'em, 3-A as one's first two cards; from the ice cream chain's "31 Flavors."

Bay and a Gray


A $6 bet, consisting of a red chip ($5) and a white chip ($1). Such a bet would be made in a $3-$6 limit game. Bay comes from horseracing, where it is a reddish brown horse with black markings; red casino chips often have black markings on their edges.

B-Dealer


A Bottom Dealer. A cheat who deals cards from the bottom of the deck. Also sometimes called b-dealer, subway dealer, or cellar dealer.

Bean


Chip; dollar. "Dealer, would you sell me some ante beans?" "Cost ya a bean to get in this pot."

Bear


A tight player.

Beat


1) Get ahead of. "I can't beat this game." 2) The situation of losing a pot, often to someone defying the odds; usually preceded by bad. "I had four kings pat. The guy called a raise to draw three to ace-joker and made a five-high straight flush. What a bad beat!"

Beat the Board


In a stud or hold'em game, have a hand better than any other player's board. The opposite is can't beat the board, and means that a particular player's entire seven-card hand cannot beat the four exposed cards of another player.

Bedsprings


A form of widow game found only in home games, in which each player is dealt five down cards, as in draw, followed by a betting round, and then 10 cards are arranged in two columns of five, with each turned face up one at a time, each followed by another betting round (yes, 11 betting rounds). Each player makes the best hand possible by using any combination from his five and two next to each other from the widow.

Bee Deck


A standard paper deck for card room use, made by the American Playing Card Company; so called because of a drawing of a large bee on the ace of spades. Since the cards often have a diamond pattern on the back, they are sometimes called diamond-back cards.

Beer Hand


In hold 'em, 7-2 as one's first two cards.

Beggar


In high games, a no-pair hand (and one that is not a straight or flush, either) with no card higher than a 10.

Behind


1) Losing. "Are you behind or ahead?" 2) With regard to a reference position at the table, acting after (usually immediately after). If the deal is one position to your left, you are behind the deal. If a player is sitting to your left, he acts behind you.

Behind a Log


Describing a situation in which a player is far ahead of a game and thus playing only premium hands. Sometimes playing behind a log.

Belly Buster


A draw to fill an insight straight; a gut shot.

Belly Card


A card that makes an inside straight.

Belly Hit


A card that makes an inside straight.

Belly-Buster Straight


A straight made by catching a belly buster.

Belly-Up


1) Honestly; usually preceded by play. To play belly-up implies honest play from a usually dishonest player. "Why do I deal myself seconds? Because I can't win when I play belly-up." 2) Playing carefully, as opposed to recklessly. "I don't lose as much when I play belly-up, but I don't have any fun, either." 3) Broke; busted. "I went belly-up after I had that flush beat."

Bend


Mark a card by creasing or folding slightly.

Bent


1) A card marked by creasing or folding slightly, so that a cutter can cut to that card. 2) A card being innocently or accidentally folded. "Give us a new deck; we've got a bent card."

Berries


The nuts; usually preceded by the.

Berry Patch


An easy (to beat) game, particularly one full of live ones gambling it up.

Best Flush


A form of draw poker found only in home games, in which only flushes win. If there are more than one flush, the best one wins, exactly as if two or more flushes were competing in an ordinary game. If there is only one five-card flush, that hand wins. If there are no flushes, then the best four-card flush wins. If there are no four-card flushes, then the best three-card flush wins. Rarely, the best two-card flush wins.

Best of it


1) Advantage or edge. In lowball, it might be said of a conservative player, "When you're both drawing, he's usually got the best of it." For this sense, the opposite of worst of it. 2) An edge gained by cheating; often preceded by taking or take. "He's never in a game unless he's taking the best of it."

Best-Hand


A cheating technique, necessarily involving signals, in which only the best hand among two or more partners is played in any one pot, thereby saving the others money when that hand is beat, and reducing the difficulties of figuring out who gets how much at split time.

Bet


To put money into the pot, pursuant to the rules of the game, thus maintaining a chance of winning the pot.

Bet after the declare


A variation found in home games in which there is an extra round of betting after players have made their declaration. The showdown follows this round of betting. Also called bet-declare-bet.

Bet blind


Make a bet without looking at one's cards. This occurs most frequently in lowball, in which a player draws one or more cards and, on the second round of betting, bets before receiving the card or cards. This is done usually for the purpose of stimulating action, but sometimes to discourage an opponent from raising. Sometimes players claim to bet blind but have actually seen their draw card or cards; doing this is considered bad form, and gives the claimant a bad reputation. The term is also heard in seven-card stud, with a player betting before receiving the river card, or in hold 'em before the river card is dealt.

Bet for Value


Betting in order to raise the amount in the pot, not to make your opponents fold.

Bet into


To bet before a stronger hand, or a player who bet strongly on the previous round.

Bet on the come


Playing a worthless hand in the hope of improving it is called "betting on the come."

Bet out of turn


Put money in the pot before it is one's turn to do so, that is, before other players who are supposed to act first have had a chance to indicate what they are going to do. In most card rooms, acting out of turn is not binding. A player who puts money in the pot out of turn is usually permitted to withdraw that money, and is usually required to do so. Betting out of turn is often an honest mistake, particularly from a beginner or someone who doesn't pay enough attention to what is going on; sometimes, though, it is an angle intended to influence the action of others.

Bet the Limit


Bet the maximum permitted, usually in a spread-limit, no-limit, or pot-limit game.

Bet the Pot


To bet the total value of the pot.

Bet the Raise


A betting limit in which a player can bet or raise a maximum equal to the total amount of chips the previous player has put into the pot.

Bet Through


When a player bets first in a situation in which two or more active players remain, he is said to be betting through the players between him and the last player.

Bet-Declare-Bet


A variation found in home games in which there is an extra round of betting after players have made their declaration. The showdown follows this round of betting. Also called bet-after-declare.

Bet-or-Drop


A form of draw poker in which, before the draw, if the pot has not yet been opened, a player must, in turn, either open the pot, or fold. Also called pass-and-out or pass-out. Compare with pass-and-back-in.

Bet-or-Fold


A form of draw poker in which, before the draw, if the pot has not yet been opened, a player must, in turn, either open the pot, or fold. Also called pass-and-out or pass-out. Compare with pass-and-back-in.

Betting Black


Betting $100 amounts (black is a common color for $100 chips).

Betting Green


Betting $25 amounts (green is a common color for $25 chips).

Betting Interval


The period during which each active player has the right to check, bet or raise; the round of betting. It ends when the last bet or raise has been called by all players still in the hand

Betting Level


The limit at which a tournament is currently being played at a particular time.

Betting Red


Betting $5 amounts (red is a common color for $5 chips).

Betting Round


The period of time in a given round during which each active player has the option, in turn, of folding, betting, or raising, that is, from the first to the last bet in that round.

Betting White


Betting $1 amounts (white is a common color for $1 chips).

Betty Hutton


A poker game played only in private or home games, a form of seven-card stud in which 5s and 9s are wild.

B-Game


The second-highest game in a particular club.

Bicycle


The best possible low hand: A-2-3-4-5. More common term: Wheel.

Bicycle Cards


A paper card room deck manufactured by the American Playing Card Company with cards that feature a bicycle rider on the back. Also called Rider back.

Bicycle Wheel


1) A bicycle wheel (also called a wheel or a bicycle) is just the following hand: A2345. Normally this is a straight to the five. In games played for low, this is sometimes the best possible low hand (see ace to five). 2) A great hand in some high-low games where it's the nut low and counts as a straight for the high pot. 3) Note that in Kansas City Lowball, a wheel is 23457, or the nut low.

Bid


In high/low games, declaring one's hand as high or low or both ways (usually done with chips in hand). Usually played in home games.

Big


Pertaining to $1000. "I lost six big" means "I lost $6000."

Big Apple


Big game, often the biggest game in a particular club. "I lost $1000 in the big apple today."

Big Bet


1) Describing a pot-limit or no-limit game. 2) In a double-limit game, a bet at the larger bet size.

Big Bet Game


1) A pot-limit or no-limit game. 2) High-stakes game.

Big Bill


1) $100 bill. 2) $1000 bill.

Big Blind


A blind bet, usually a raise of an earlier blind which would be called the Small Blind. In limit poker, the BIG BLIND is usually the size of the minimum bet on the first round of betting.

Big Bobtail


An open-ended 4-card straight flush.

Big Casino


The 10 of diamonds; in lowball, a hand topped by this card.

Big Cat


A nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, five cards 8 to king with no pair, which ranks above a tiger and just below a flush). Also called big tiger.

Big Dime


$10,000; usually heard only among sports bettors.

Big Dog


A nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, five cards 9 to ace with no pair, which ranks below a little tiger and above a little dog.

Big Full


In hold 'em, the highest possible full house, that is, three aces and two kings.

Big Game


The biggest game in the house; usually preceded by the.

Big Hand


A powerful hand, perhaps a full house or better in high poker, or a 6 or better in lowball. "His hand shakes whenever he has a big hand."

Big Limit


One of the largest games played in a particular establishment or area. "He plays only big limit."

Big Nickel


$500.00

Big One


$100 or $1000, or a bill of that size. "How'd you do today?" "Lost a big one." (You can usually tell by the size of game the player habitually plays how much he means.)

Big Player


A big-limit player, or someone who plays in large no-limit games.

Big Slick


In Texas Hold'em, hole cards of A-K, suited or not.

Big Squeeze


High-low six-card stud, sometimes played with a twist.

Big Tiger


A nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, five cards 8 to king with no pair, which ranks above a tiger and just below a flush). Also called big cat.

Bike


A Bicycle. The best possible low hand: A-2-3-4-5. More common term: Wheel.

Bill


A $100 bill. When you cash out just over $100, the cashier might ask, "Do you want a bill?" The cashier wants to know if you would prefer five twenties, or a single bill.

Bird Dog


1) Someone who checks out the action at a club (usually implying that he was sent by a rival club). 2) Someone who hustles players from one club into another. (Doing so is strictly against all card-room etiquette, and is likely to get the perpetrator barred if he's caught.)

Bitch


A Queen.

Black


A $100 chip, in many card rooms and casinos.

Black Chip


A $100 chip, in many card rooms and casinos.

Black Chip Game


A high-stakes game, that is, one using $100 chips.

Black Leg


Archaic term for crooked card-sharp.

Black Maria


1) The queen of spades; sometimes called just Maria. 2) The ace of spades, particularly when associated with the game of high spade in the hole. 3) A high spade in the hole. 4) Also in home games, seven-card stud in which the pot is split between the holder of the high hand and the player who has the queen of spades in the hole.

Blank


A card that is of no value to a player's hand.

Blaze


1) A hand consisting of five face cards. It has no ranking in card room poker, though sometimes does in private games. The term is often used by lowball players to embellish their hard-luck stories. "That guy just got his second bicycle, and what'd I get? Another blaze." 2) A nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, consisting of five face cards, ranking between two pair and three of a kind.

Bleed


Win a lot of money a little at a time, from either a game or a particular player.

Blind


1) A mandatory bet made by certain player(s) usually sitting left of the Button before each new hand is dealt. Used in place of antes or in conjunction with antes. 2) Describing the Southern California form of limit poker, in which one blind is put in by the player to the left of the deal position, and any player winning two pots in a row must over blind the next hand (that is, double the stakes). Who wins a hand is usually kept track of by a plastic disk labeled "blind" on one side. The winner of one pot receives the disk face down with his chips; if he wins the next pot, the house dealer turns the disk so that the "blind" side is face up.

Blind and Atraddle Game


A game in which the player to the left of the dealer (the blind) puts in (usually) one chip before getting any cards, and the player to his left (the straddle) puts in two chips. This represents a blind open followed by a blind raise. The first player to have a choice on making a bet after having seen his cards is the player two positions to the left of the dealer. This is an old name for what is now called a two-blind traveling blind game. This is similar to ante and straddle.

Blind Bet (Or Blind)


A blind bet, or blind, is a forced bet that must be posted before you see any cards. Blinds are an alternative to antes for getting money in the pot initially. Blinds are more often used in flop games like hold'em and omaha than in stud and draw games. Typically in hold'em the two players to the left of the dealer button are forced to place blind bets. In limit play, the small blind (to the dealer's left) is typically half the size of a small bet, and the big blind (to the small blind's left) is a full small bet. Betting then starts with the player to the left of the big blind (who is considered under the gun), who must at least call the big blind to stay in. When you sit down at a new table, it's good to wait until it's your turn to blind before playing a hand. See also live blind, structure, and straddle. "Big blind" and "small blind" are also used to refer to the players who posted these bets.

Blind Game


A game with blinds.

Blind Off


In a tournament, when a player doesn't show up at the start of a tournament but has paid for his chips, or after a break or on a second or succeeding day of play, his chips are put into the pot to cover his blind or blinds each time the blinds come to him, until he does show up. If the player never shows up, all his chips might be blinded off.

Blind Open


1) A game in which the player to the left of the dealer (the blind) puts in (usually) one chip before getting any cards. After all the cards have been dealt, the player to the left of the blind must either fold, call the opening bet, or raise. In some games, this player must come in for a raise (or fold). 2) An opening bet made without looking at one's cards.

Blind Opening


A game in which the player to the left of the dealer (the blind) puts in (usually) one chip before getting any cards. After all the cards have been dealt, the player to the left of the blind must either fold, call the opening bet, or raise. In some games, this player must come in for a raise (or fold).

Blind Raise


When a player raises without first looking at his or her cards.

Blind Robber


Someone who steals the blind (usually from the middle blind position to win the big blind, or the dealer position to win both blinds), that is, opens a pot without having good cards, hoping the blind will just throw his cards away and the opener can win the chips represented by the blind or blinds without having to actually play the hand.

Blind Stealer


Someone who steals the blind (usually from the middle blind position to win the big blind, or the dealer position to win both blinds), that is, opens a pot without having good cards, hoping the blind will just throw his cards away and the opener can win the chips represented by the blind or blinds without having to actually play the hand.

Blind Stud


A home game, also called Mike or racehorse, played as five-, six-, or seven-card stud, with the exception that all cards are dealt face down.

Blind Tiger


Blind Open. A game in which the player to the left of the dealer (the blind) puts in (usually) one chip before getting any cards. After all the cards have been dealt, the player to the left of the blind must either fold, call the opening bet, or raise. In some games, this player must come in for a raise (or fold).

Blister


To peg.

Blistering


The marks put on cards described under peg.

Blivit


A totally worthless hand. When caught bluffing, a player might announce, "I've got a blivit."

Block


A worthless watch. This has card room relevance, because you will often encounter a broker trying to sell you a hoop or a block.

Block System


1) A form of blind open (A game in which the player to the left of the dealer (the blind) puts in (usually) one chip before getting any cards.) in which large compulsory blind bets start the action. 2) Marking the backs of cards by covering part of the design with ink.

Blockout Work


Marking the backs of cards by covering part of the design with ink.

Blocky


In hold 'em, 6-3 as one's first two cards.

Blood Game


A, usually, high-stakes poker game, in which the prime objective of the players is to win money. Also called cutthroat game. The opposite of a social game.

Blook


The joker. This term is used only by those who have played a lot in home games and not much in card rooms.

Blooker


The joker. This term is used only by those who have played a lot in home games and not much in card rooms. Sometimes called blook.

Blow


Lose a pot. "I blew that pot."

Blow Back


Lose one's profit, often due to having stuck around too long.

Blue


Having a spade or club flush. Also, all black.

Bluff


To make a bet or raise with a poor hand, in hope that the remaining active player(s) will fold.

Bluff Catcher


A hand with which a player feels he must call, even in a situation in which he is likely to lose. If a player stands pat in draw, and you call with three aces, you can say, "I had a bluff catcher."

Board


1) The exposed cards in Hold'em and stud. Also Board Cards. 2) A list of players' names or initials, those who want seating in or changes to particular games. In many clubs, there really is a blackboard or other large writing surface at the front or side of the room with lists of names.

Board Man


The casino employee who writes names or initials on the board, and calls players as their seats open up. Also, boardman, board person.

Board Person


The casino employee who writes names or initials on the board, and calls players as their seats open up. Also, boardman, board person.

Boardman


The casino employee who writes names or initials on the board, and calls players as their seats open up. Also, boardman, board person.

Boat


Another name for full house. I've also heard "full boat," but I think it sounds idiotic so I'm not giving it a separate entry.

Bobtail


Four cards to a straight or flush.

Bobtail Flush


Four cards to a flush.

Bobtail Straight


1) Four cards to a straight. 2) A nonstandard hand, four cards to a straight, that ranks higher than one pair and lower than a four-card flush.

Bobtailed Straight


1) Four cards to a straight. 2) A nonstandard hand, four cards to a straight, that ranks higher than one pair and lower than a four-card flush.

Bone


A $1 chip. Probably comes from home poker games, in which the white chips are usually the lowest denomination.

Book


1) In draw poker (high), the drawing of three cards. "How many cards do you need?" "Gimme a book." 2) "The book" is a mythical set of instructions supposedly containing the poker wisdom of the ages. A player speaks of "playing by the book," by which he means he is playing a hand the way he thinks it is supposed to be played; such players usually think "playing by the book" is equivalent to playing tight. Actually, there is no book.

Boost


To raise.

Border Work


Markings (or cosmetics) put on the borders of cards with paint, ink, or some other fluid, so that a thief can read the ranks (and sometimes suits) of the cards from the back or side.

Boss Hand


[1] 1) The winner of a pot.

Bottom


Card dealt from the bottom of the deck.

Bottom Dealer


A cheat who deals cards from the bottom of the deck. Also sometimes called b-dealer, subway dealer, or cellar dealer.

Bottom Pair


A pair with the lowest card on the flop. If you have As-6s, and the flop comes Kd-Th-6c, you have flopped bottom pair.

Bottoms


Cards dealt from the bottom of the deck.

Bouble Bluff


A bluff made by betting, getting raised, and then re-raising.

Bounty


A small amount of cash awarded to a player when he knocks out another player in some tournaments. This is typically in low buy-in tournaments.

Bounty Tournament


A tournament in which bounties are offered (Small amounts of cash awarded to a player when he knocks out another player).

Box


1) A (usually empty) rack (of chips). "Time to cash out. Bring me three boxes." 2) The box man. 3) By extension, the house dealer's location when dealing, usually heard as part of the phrase in the box, which literally means engaged in dealing.

Box Man


House dealer.

Boxed


Facing the wrong way, usually said of a card in a deck. "Re-deal those, houseman. I see a boxed card."

Boxed Card


A card facing the wrong way, usually said of a card in a deck. "Re-deal those, houseman. I see a boxed card."

Boy


Jack. "I have three boys" means "I have three of a kind, jacks."

Br


Short for Bankroll.

Brag


An ancient English card game that some say is an ancestor of poker. Its name comes from a challenge, the word "brag," issued at some point in the game by one player to the rest to come up with cards as good as his.

Bragg


An ancient English card game that some say is an ancestor of poker. Its name comes from a challenge, the word "brag," issued at some point in the game by one player to the rest to come up with cards as good as his.

Brass Brazilians


The nuts; usually preceded by the.

Break


1) Win all of somebody's chips. "Who broke Smiley?" 2) Miss. "I broke the hand when I caught a 10." That implies that the 10 was not the card the player wanted to draw. 3) Throw away part of a lowball hand (presumably with the intention of making a better hand, because as it stands the hand is probably not a winner). "I knew he had me beat, so I broke the 8, and came back on a 6, and beat a slick 7 for him." 4) Remove some chips from your stack, usually followed by [one's] stack or chips. In some clubs, if you break your stack when it is your time to bet, that is considered a bet, and you must follow through, that is, complete the bet. This is to prevent an angle shooter from putting chips into the pot to gauge another's reaction and then withdrawing the chips without betting; in some clubs a bet is not considered complete until the player has released the chips from his hand. 5) In lowball, to draw. (The implication is that if circumstances were different the player could stand pat on the hand.) "You don't need any cards? Okay, I'll break."

Break a Game


Perform the action of stopping a game from being played, when, for example, only a few players remain--not enough for a full game--after other players have quit. Such action is generally performed by a floor person. Sometimes break a game up.

Break Even


End up, after a playing session, neither winning nor losing, often implying after having been losing.

Break for Action


In lowball, throw away part of a good hand to get a play from someone who would otherwise fold. "Come on, call the raise, and I'll break for action." The preceding might be heard in a no-limit lowball game in the following situation. One player has raised. The opener does not want to call because he needs two cards, which is not a good gamble against what might well be a pat hand. The raiser wants a call from the other because he has the potential of winning a very large pot as opposed to just a small pot if the other folds, so he tries to entice the opener, implying that if the opener draws two, he will break his pat hand and draw one.

Break Off


Throw away part of a lowball hand (presumably with the intention of making a better hand, because as it stands the hand is probably not a winner). "I knew he had me beat, so I broke the 8, and came back on a 6, and beat a slick 7 for him."

Breaking Hand


In lowball, an 8, 9, or 10 (that is, a hand topped by one of those cards) that can be broken under pressure. 9-4-3-2-A is a breaking hand, because you can throw the 9 and draw to a wheel; 9-8-7-3-A is not, because there really is no place to break. Also called a two-way hand.

Brick


1) In Omaha, a useless card that hits the board.

Bridge


A bend, particularly one readily visible, in one or more cards in such a way as to force the deck to be cut to the spot desired by a cheat.

Bridge Order


Suit order according to the game of bridge, that is, spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs. Bridge order comes into play when breaking a tie for high card in determining which hand gets the odd chip, who has the high-card forced bet in seven-card stud (as played in home games), or who starts the deal on the first hand at a particular table.

Brief


A tiny "ledge" shuffled into a deck by a cheater so that his accomplice can cut it at the prearranged location; a card offset by a barely perceptible fraction of an inch but able to be found by touch when cut. A brief can be felt but not easily seen; a good cutter can feel a 1/32-inch brief. Sometimes called jog, needle, or step.

Bring in


Open (a pot). "Who brought it in?" means "Who opened?" In a no-limit game, followed by for and an amount means open for that amount, as, "I'll bring it in for $40" means "I'll open for $40," and implies that the bet is more than the minimum.

Bring in a Deck


To substitute a prearranged deck for the one that is supposed to be dealt.

Bring it in


To start the betting on the first round.

Bring it.


1) If said at the showdown, means "I win." (That is, push the pot my way.) 2) If said when time to draw cards, means "Give me one card."

Bring-in


1) The amount required to open a pot. "What's the bring-in" is asked by a player who wants to know how much is the minimum he can bet, or how much is the required amount to open the pot. 2) The player who opened the betting.

Broadway


An ace high straight. Usually heard only in stud and community-card games.

Broderick Crawford


1) In lowball, a 10-4 low. 2) In hold 'em, starting cards of a 10 and a 4. The term came from the 50s television show "Highway Patrol," starring Broderick Crawford, who always said "10-4" into his police radio; 10-4 is part of the police "10-code," and signifies affirmation or confirmation.

Broken Game


A game that just broke up, as, for example, when only a few players remain--not enough for a full game--after other players have quit. Some card rooms allow a player entering another game after having last played in a broken game to be dealt in without having to post, kill, wait for the blind, or otherwise put up money to receive a hand.

Broker


Someone with no money of his own who hangs around a card room waiting for a sucker to put him into a game--by staking him or lending money that likely will not be returned--or hoping for one of his few friends to make a score and give him part of it; a deadbeat, or a card room bum.

Brush


A card room employee responsible for managing the seating list.

Brush Man


A male brush person.

Brush Off


Give a thief a secret sign to leave; usually brush someone off. This is usually done by a houseman who privately (in such a way as not to embarrass the thief and not to alert the unknowing customers that some of the patrons may not be strictly on the up-and-up) requests a player to leave. The request is often in the form of a finger run unobtrusively up the offender's spine. It can be a literal brushing motion (hence the name) of one hand down the other arm, starting below the elbow, across the other hand, which is palm down, to the fingertips. It can also be a brushing motion of one hand across the upper lip.

Brush Person


A casino employee who works in the card room, usually just outside it, whose job is somewhat akin to that of a sideshow barker or a nightclub greeter, in that this person tries to attract prospective players into the card room. The brush person talks to casino patrons who may be lingering on the edge of the card room area.

Brush-Off


The act of giving a thief a secret sign to leave. "I gave him the brush-off and he left right away."

Bubble


The position just out of the money in a tournament; often part of the phrase on the bubble.

Buck


1) A marker used in games with a house dealer to indicate the deal position. Once upon a time, an actual buck knife was used as the marker, hence the name. Usually found now as part of the phrase pass the buck, that is, refuse to deal when it is one's turn to deal, passing the deck instead to the next player to the left. The phrase has passed into general usage meaning shift responsibility to someone else, and has found a place in most collections of famous quotations and sayings with Harry Truman's well-known slogan, "The buck stops here." 2) Go up against, in the sense of an inferior hand trying to beat an obviously better hand.

Buck the Odds


Go up against, in the sense of an inferior hand trying to beat an obviously better hand.

Bug


1) The joker when used as a "partially wild card" in high draw poker and ace-to-five lowball. In high, it is good for aces, straights, and flushes. It makes a third (or fourth) ace, but does not improve any other pair. In a deck with the bug, a rank of hand exists higher than any straight flush: five aces. 2) A cheating device to hold a card to the underside of a table.

Buick


In lowball, a straight 8. Buick used to build a straight 8 engine.

Build a Game Around


Put a game together to accommodate a particular player, often a live one or producer. "When Arco Al came in, they built a game around him."

Bull


Ace; also bullet.

Bull the Game


1) Bluff a lot. 2) Bet aggressively, regardless of one's cards.

Bullet(s)


Ace(s); also bull.

Bullets


Chips. Also called ammunition.

Bully Johnson


In hold 'em, 3-5 as one's first two cards.

Bum


In lowball, when referring to the rank of a hand, not good; usually followed by a rank. "I have a bum 8" means a rough 8, presumably 8-7-6.

Bump


To raise. This term is used only by those who have played a lot in home games and not much in card rooms.

Bump Heads


Two players fight it out for a pot, and both get all their chips in the pot.

Bundle


1) Large bet. "When I checked, he bet a bundle, and I couldn't call." 2) Large bankroll.

Bunny


An eight. So named because one can easily draw "rabbit ears" above the numeral 8, "paws" in the middle and "feet" at the bottom.

Buried


Losing heavily. "How ya doin'?" "I'm buried."

Buried Pair


A buried pair is a pair in the hole in seven card stud.

Burn


1) To deal off the top card, face down, before dealing out the cards (to prevent cheating). 2) To set aside a card which has been inadvertently revealed.

Burn and Turn


Function as a poker dealer, from the practice of burning a card before dealing either a round of face-up cards (in stud) or the flop (in hold 'em).

Burn Card


1) To deal off the top card, face down, before dealing out the cards (to prevent cheating). 2) To set aside a card which has been inadvertently revealed.

Bury


1) To deal off the top card, face down, before dealing out the cards (to prevent cheating). 2) To set aside a card which has been inadvertently revealed. Sometimes a distinction is made between bury and burn. If the distinction is made, in a bury the card is placed in the middle of the un-dealt portion of the deck

Bust


1) A hand drawn to and missed. 2) Any worthless hand. 3) Win all of someone's chips. Usually you bust someone. 4) To be eliminated from a game or tournament by losing all your chips.

Bust a Player


To deprive a player of all his chips; in tournament play, to eliminate a player

Bust Hand


A hand drawn to and missed.

Bust Out


1) To be eliminated from a game or tournament by losing all your chips. 2) Miss the hand one is drawing to, usually in lowball.

Busted


Having no money or chips.

Busted Flush


A busted hand that missed a draw to a straight or a flush is a busted straight or a busted flush.

Busted Hand


A hand drawn to and missed.

Busted Straight


A missed straight.

Bust-Out


Someone with no money of his own who hangs around a card room waiting for a sucker to put him into a game--by staking him or lending money that likely will not be returned--or hoping for one of his few friends to make a score and give him part of it; a deadbeat, or a card room bum.

Bust-Out Joint


A crooked gaming establishment.

Button


1) In all flop games, a small disk used to signify the player in the last position if a house dealer is used; a buck. 2) The actual dealer position (or, usually, the player in that position) in a game dealt by a house dealer. "I opened the pot, and the button raised."

Button Charge


A periodic fee paid by whoever is the button, perhaps every 20 minutes or 30 minutes. Constitutes part or all of the House Cut.

Buy


1) As in "buy the pot." To bluff, hoping to "buy" the pot without being called. 2) As in "buy the button." To bet or raise, hoping to make players between you and the button fold, thus allowing you to act last on subsequent betting rounds. 3) In draw poker, receive one or more cards. "What did you buy on the draw?" means "What card or cards did you receive?" 4) Purchase chips.

Buy Short


Buy less than the minimum required for the game.

Buy the Pot


To match the pot.

Buy-in


[1] 1) The minimum amount required to get into a game. "The buy-in for limit games is 10 times the lower limit; for example, in a $2-$4 game, the buy-in is $20."

By me.


I check" or "I pass.

C


Clubs (the suit), in written text. Kc, for example, is the king of clubs (K ).

Caesar


The king of diamonds.

Cage


A room or an area, often behind a glass or behind bars, from which the cage person buys and sells chips. Also, window.

Cage Girl


A female cashier.

Cage Man


A cashier of the male persuasion.

Cage Person


Cashier, specifically, the person who dispenses chips to the floor personnel, cashes players in when they leave, cashes checks for players, sometimes sells chips to players, keeps track of players' banks, records the progress of stake players (if any), keeps track of time collections, etc.

Calamity Jane


The queen of spades. Named for the markswoman of the Old West.

California


A form of poker found only in home games, a widow game in which each player receives five cards face down, as does a central area of the table, followed by a round of betting, and then the dealer turns up each central card, one at a time, each followed by another round of betting. At the showdown, each player uses the best five cards among his five and those of the widow. The game is often played high-low split. Also called Utah, Lamebrains, or California. Southern Cross is a variant of Cincinnati.

California Blind


Bet-or-fold, double limit draw poker (high), open on anything, with three traveling blinds.

California Draw


1) High draw poker as most often played in limit games: pass-and-back-in before the draw, jacks or better to open, each player antes, and there are no blinds. 2) As played in no-limit games, bet-or-fold (before the draw) draw poker, open on anything, usually played winner blind or with one or more traveling blinds (see traveling blind), and sometimes also with antes from each player. For both definitions, often called just draw or high.

California Game


Any of the games played in the California games section of a card room or casino.

California Games


A set of card room games, formerly called Asian games, some of which resemble poker, but are not strictly poker, in which players place bets before receiving the hands on which they wager. Others resemble blackjack. In these games, to get around the legal restriction against banking games, the only interest the house has is to take a portion of every bet; one player acts as banker, playing one hand against each player in turn. These games include pai gow (played with tiles, and not a card game at all), pai gow poker, super nine (also called super pan nine), California blackjack (also called X blackjack, where X is the name of the club), California Aces (a variant of blackjack in which the object is to get closest to 22, with two aces being the best hand; similarly often called X aces), 13-card (not played with a banker).

California Lowball


Five card ace-to-five low draw poker with the joker, bet-or-fold before the draw, sevens rule after the draw.

Call


To call is to match the current bet. If there has been a bet of $10 and a raise of $10 then it costs $20 to call. Calling is the cheapest (and the most passive) way to remain in a hand. See also cold call, flat call, and it - To put in to the pot the minimum amount of money necessary to continue playing. See also: SEE. (CALL is used mostly in the present tense with the bet as the object, see with future tense and the original bettor as the object).

Call Cold


To call a bet and raise at once.

Call Someone Down


Check each round, and call each bet made by an opponent (who presumably bets each round).

Called Hand


A hand that someone bet and someone else called, as opposed to a hand that was bet and no one called. The term often comes up when a bet is made, called, and lost, and the bettor who lost the hand now wants to throw the cards away unshown (perhaps from embarrassment at being caught bluffing).

Caller


One who calls. Sometimes used collectively, as in "3 callers".

Calling Hand


A hand with which a player feels he must call a (often any) bet. "I knew you made it, but I had a calling hand."

Calling Station


A player who calls much too often is called a calling station. Such a player will pay you off when you make hands, and will often fail to press their advantage when they have relatively strong hands. On the other hand, calling stations will hit more backdoor and other unlikely draws than other players, making it occasionally frustrating to play against them, especially in large numbers.

Canine


In hold 'em, K-9 as one's first two cards. Also, pedigree.

Can't Beat the Board


1) In a stud game, have an entire seven-card hand that cannot beat the four exposed cards of another player. 2) In hold 'em, have a hand that cannot beat the board (The exposed cards); this implies that the player is playing the board.

Cap


1) After dealing the first round, put a chip on top of the un-dealt cards for protection; usually followed by the deck. 2) Put in the maximum number of raises in a round of betting; usually followed by the bet, the bets, or the betting. Make the maximum raise permitted in the current round. "I'll cap it" means that someone has put in the, say, third raise.

Capable


Having the ability to cheat. "Is he capable?" means "Is he a thief or mechanic?"

Capitola.


Saying, often said by California dealers, that means "The betting is capped."

Capped


Describing the situation in which the maximum number of raises in a round of betting have been made.

Capper


The chip used to cap the deck.

Cappuccino.


Saying, often said by dealers, that means "The betting is capped."

Card


1) One of 52 (or 53) flat, rectangular objects, made usually of paper or plastic, with a uniform design on one side (the backs) and a representation of value (rank and suit) on the other; each card is either the joker, or one of the four suits (spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs) and 13 ranks (A, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, T, J, Q, K). A complete set of cards is called a deck. Paper cards are sometimes called pasteboards. Collectively, cards are sometimes called the Devil's playthings. 2) A player's bank. 3) Check cashing card.

Card Club


A card room.

Card Dauber


Someone who marks cards.

Card Down


The situation in which a card has been dealt off the table or otherwise dropped to the floor, and a floor person must be called to pick up the card, because, in many casinos and card rooms, the house dealer is not permitted to retrieve the card, nor is a player. If a card falls on the floor, the dealer may announce, "Card down," and a floor person comes over to pick it up. Whether the card or cards that fell to the floor are still live or dead is subject to individual card room interpretation.

Card Mechanic


A cheat who manipulates the deck.

Card Mob


Two or more cheaters working together in a card game.

Card Money


Money allocated by a gambler for playing at cards; bankroll.

Card Play


Playing at cards. Also, carding

Card Player


The premier magazine devoted to card playing.

Card Playing


Playing at cards. Also, carding, card play.

Card Rack


Someone who gets a lot of good hands; usually used facetiously or humorously. Sometimes called human card rack.

Card Room


1) An establishment, usually open to the public, in which cards, usually poker, are played. 2) The section of a casino in which poker is played. 3) A room in a club devoted to card playing.

Card Sense


In a poker game, an acute awareness of the totality of what is going on, not narrowing your focus to just what's happening in your own hand. Card sense implies the ability to act on your observations, and to think on your feet. You must have imagination in playing your own hand, almost x-ray vision in being able to reconstruct opponents' hands. It is card sense that causes a player to play the same cards differently in different situations. A player without card sense usually plays the same cards the same in all situations.

Card Shark


An expert card player, usually a professional gambler. The term is not necessarily synonymous with cheater.

Card Smith


A card player, particular one who plays for a living.

Card Table


1) Poker table. 2) Any table designed specially for playing cards. Different styles of tables are used for bridge, blackjack, baccarat, and poker, which itself has several types, depending on the specific game.

Card Wrench


A device to pry apart cards so that the card you caught will fit the hand; used humorously. If, in high draw poker, a player draws to 4-5-6-7 and catches a 9, he might say, "I need a card wrench to fix this hand."

Carder


One who plays cards, particularly a professional.

Card-Holder


A player who seems to get more good hands than random chance would dictate.

Card-Hustler


Card thief.

Carding


1) Playing at cards. 2) Noting exposed cards (particularly at seven-card stud), and using that information in the play of a hand.

Card-Room License


A specific gambling license issued by any combination of municipality, county, state, or country, to a card room, usually specifying the types of games permitted, the stakes, hours of operation, and other restrictions.

Cards


1) The playing of a card game, often poker. "I'm going out to play some cards tonight." 2) A deck. "Give me the cards; it's my deal." 3) Any portion of a deck. "You're not supposed to pick up the cards for the next deal until the previous hand is completely over."

Cards Break Even


The theory that states in the long run everyone gets the same cards implies that if the cards are running bad for awhile for a particular player, they will eventually fall back into a normal pattern. "I'll get even if the cards ever start breaking even."

Cards Speak


1) Cards speak is simply the rule that the value of your hand is determined solely by your cards. You don't have to declare your hand properly in order to claim the part of the pot you deserve. The alternative to this is mainly declare games, usually played in home games for low stakes 2) A name for high-low split with no declaration.

Cardshark


An expert card player, usually a professional gambler. The term is not necessarily synonymous with cheater.

Cardsharping


The Cheating at cards.

Caribbean Stud


A casino game, banked by the house, that resembles poker only in the ranking of the hands. The game is sort of a cross between poker and a slot machine. Players bet before receiving their cards that their hands will be better than the dealer's; they can increase the bet after seeing their hands. Certain combinations, usually three of a kind or better, pay premiums, and a royal flush wins a progressive jackpot.

Carpet Joint


A well-appointed casino or card room, as opposed to a sawdust joint. Also called rug joint.

Carry a Slug


Shuffle a slug into prearranged position.

Carry Over


Credit a stake or a cow with his chips from one shift to the next. A stake player is usually liable for the amount of his last press.

Carry-Over


Chips or cash being carried over.

Case


1) Descriptive of the only remaining card of a rank or suit. "I caught the case ace" means there was only one left to draw (in a draw game) or hit (in a stud game) and the player got it. 2) All; said of money. "He bought in for his case money" means that all he had in his pocket went to buy chips; if he loses these, he can't buy anymore. 3) The last card of a denomination or suit, when the rest have already been seen. 4) Look over; usually said of a card room, referring to checking out the action. "He only comes in to case the joint, and never lights."

Case Bet


A gambler's last bet, when he has lost his bankroll or stake.

Case Card


The last card of a denomination or suit, when the rest have already been seen.

Case Chips


A player's last chips.

Case Money


The last of a gambler's bankroll or stake.

Cash in


To leave the game and convert one's chips to cash, either with the dealer or at the cage.

Cash Out


To leave a game and cash in one's chips at the cage.

Casino


1) A building or establishment devoted to gambling games of all kinds. 2) A large, usually opulent, card room.

Casino Cage


A room or an area, often behind a glass or behind bars, from which the cage person buys and sells chips. Also, window.

Casino Chowaha


A hold 'em variant invented in a private game by RGPer Mike Chow, and popularized at BARGE, in which each player gets two down cards, the dealer flops nine cards, arranged in three rows of three, then turns two cards vertically at the ends of the "corridors" between the preceding rows, and rivers one card in the middle and to the right of the two, the whole arrangement forming a large arrow-like structure. Players form their best five-card hand using their two plus any three cards from the four possible five-card board combinations: top row of three plus top card of two plus river card, bottom row of three plus bottom card of two plus river card, middle row of three plus either one of the two turn cards plus river card.

Cat


Any one of big tiger, little tiger, big cat, little cat.

Cat Flush


A nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, a big tiger or little tiger, all in the same suit, ranking above a straight flush (since a tiger beats a straight).

Cat Hop


In draw poker, a draw of two (or more cards) to a straight or flush, or, sometimes, to a pair with (usually) an ace kicker. The term has two implications. One is just the attempt to make such a draw. "He draws to every cat hop that comes along" implies the player draws two cards every time he starts with three cards to a straight or flush. The other is actually making it. "Wouldn't you know I'd get beat by a cat hop when I finally made a straight?"

Catbird Seat


The position immediately to the right of the dealer. This is a restricted usage of the more general term, which means advantageous situation or position.

Catch


1) Receive a card. 2) Receive a card that makes a hand (that is, in draw poker, draw a card that fills the hand or makes specifically what one was trying to make, or, in a stud game, be dealt the card one needs). "As soon as he started to bet, I knew he caught."

Catch Inside


1) In lowball or razz, make the particular hand you're drawing to. If you have 7-4-3-2, and catch a 6, 5, or ace, you catch inside. 2) In any high game, make an inside straight.

Catch Outside


1) In lowball, catch a card above the particular hand you're drawing to. If you have 7-4-3-2, and catch an 8 or higher, you catch outside. 2) In any high game, miss a straight.

Catch Perfect


Make precisely the hand you're drawing to. In lowball, if you're drawing to 8-4-3-2, and catch a 7, 6, 5, or ace you make your hand; if you catch precisely the ace, you catch perfect. In high draw, if you start with 4-5-6-7, all in diamonds, and catch any diamond, you make a flush; if you catch any 3 or 8, you make a straight. If you catch either the 3 or 8 or diamonds, you make a straight flush, and you can say you have caught perfect. The term is also heard in hold 'em, in a situation in which only one or two cards remain that will turn a losing hand into a winner.

Catch Rough


In lowball, draw a card that makes the less valuable.

Catch Smooth


In lowball, draw a card that makes the hand more valuable (best possible low hand).

Cats and Dogs


Draw poker in which certain nonstandard hands (the big and little cat or tiger and big and little dog) have value.

Caught in the Middle


Being whipsawed. To whipsaw is to raise before, and after, a caller who gets caught in the middle. "I had a joker-wheel to draw to. They both had pat sixes, and kept raising, and I was caught in the middle."

Caught Speeding


Slang for caught bluffing.

Cellar


Bottom of the deck; usually preceded by from the. Usually refers to the move of a bottom dealer. "I saw him coming from the basement" means I saw him deal a card from the bottom of the deck.

Cellar Dealer


A cheat who deals cards from the bottom of the deck. Also sometimes called b-dealer, subway dealer, or cellar dealer.

Center Dealer


The House dealer.

Center Pot


The first pot created during a poker hand. This is as opposed to one or more "side" pots that are created if one or more players goes all-in. Also "main pot."

Century


A $100 bill.

Century Note


A $100 bill.

C-Game


Any low-stakes game, generally the third highest in a given establishment.

Chance


The likelihood of a particular event, usually expressed in the form of some kind of fraction (as chances of one third, or, more often a decimal, as chances of 0.33, or percentage, as chances of 33%) or in the form of one number out of or in another (as chances of 1 out of 3, or 1 in 3).

Chances


The likelihood of a particular event, usually expressed in the form of some kind of fraction (as chances of one third, or, more often a decimal, as chances of 0.33, or percentage, as chances of 33%) or in the form of one number out of or in another (as chances of 1 out of 3, or 1 in 3).

Change Color


Replacing chips of one color with those of another. Usually implies getting rid of many smaller denomination chips for fewer of a higher denomination.

Change Gears


Alter the pace of one's playing, usually as a deceptive move against the other players, as, for example, change from fast, aggressive play to a more conservative style.

Change List


A list, usually maintained by a floor man or the house dealer, of those who want to change seats within a particular game or move to another game of the same size.

Change of Color


Replacing chips of one color with those of another. Usually implies getting rid of many smaller denomination chips for fewer of a higher denomination.

Change-in


The minimum amount required to get into a game. "The buy-in for limit games is 10 times the lower limit; for example, in a $2-$4 game, the buy-in is $20."

Charlemagne


The king of hearts.

Charles


The king of hearts. May come from Charlemagne, or King Charles VII of France.

Charlie


The third position to the left of the dealer. Sometimes called just C.

Chase


1) To make the blind good. That is, if you have the blind, the pot is opened, and you elect to put in the extra chip to try a long shot, you might say, "I'll chase." 2) When losing, bet recklessly, often desperately, in the hope of getting of even. "How's he doing?" "Stuck, and chasing." 3) Try to catch a better hand with a worse holding, usually in a stud game.

Cheat


1) Use of any of a number of crooked devices, card manipulation, deceptive tactics, and so on, to gain an unfair advantage over opponents or otherwise win dishonestly. 2) One who employs cheating techniques; A thief.

Cheater


One who employs cheating techniques; A thief.

Cheaters


Marked decks.

Cheating Device


A mechanical device for cheating, such as a holdout machine. Also called tool.

Check


1) Make no bet, but still hold your cards. You can check, and then call a later bet, fold when the action gets back to you, or raise. Technically, to check is to make a bet of nothing. 2) A card room chip; often plural. When a player cries out "Checks!", he is signaling to a floorperson his intention to buy more chips. The term check is generally limited to card rooms and casinos, while chip is more heard in home games, though common in both.

Check and Raise


Permitting players to pass and still retain their cards. "This is a check-and-raise game before the draw."

Check Blind


1) Without looking at the cards you have been dealt. 2) The card or cards you have drawn, make no bet; usually accompanied by a verbal announcement of this fact. Also check dark.

Check Cashing Card


A sheet on which the cashier keeps track of a player's transactions against a blank, signed check.

Check Cop


1) A thief whose specialty is stealing chips from pots or other players, usually by palming them. 2) A sticky substance a thief rubs on his palm to permit chips to stick to the palm without having to close his fingers around the chips. Also, glue.

Check Copper


A thief whose specialty is stealing chips from pots or other players, usually by palming them.

Check Dark


The card or cards you have drawn, make no bet; usually accompanied by a verbal announcement of this fact.

Check in the Dark


1) To check before looking at the card or cards just dealt. 2) Intention of folding on the turn and the river, but no one ever bet.

Check Rack


A box, or tray, that has indentations to neatly hold chips in (often five) stacks.

Check Raise


To check initially, then raise a bet made later on in the same betting round. Frequently a sign of strength, but may be a bluff.

Checker


A card room chip; often plural. When a player cries out "Checks!", he is signaling to a floorperson his intention to buy more chips. The term check is generally limited to card rooms and casinos, while chip is more heard in home games, though common in both.

Check-Rack


Request a player to leave. Comes from what a player usually does before cashing in: fill a chip rack with his chips, and head for the cage. "When the floor man saw Danny come from the cellar, he chip-racked him" means "When the floor man saw Danny deal a card from the bottom of the deck, he asked Danny to cash in (and leave the premises)."

Checks


Chips. Poker chips are small round discs used instead of money at the poker table. The ones used at casinos are typically made of clay, while home poker games often substitute cheaper plastic chips. Using chips instead of cash has a number of advantages, mostly just that they're easier to count and manipulate. Color designations for chips are arbitrary, but many casinos use white for $1 chips, red for $5 chips, green for $25 chips, and black for $100 chips.

Cheese


"Throw that cheese in the muck" is sometimes said by someone who has made a bet, usually large, to the person contemplating calling that bet, implying that the caller cannot win with his (supposedly) inferior hand.

Chicago


1) A form of poker found only in home games, usually played with seven cards, and ending up as a mixture of draw and stud. 2) high spade in the hole.

Chicago Bankroll


A bankroll consisting of a large number of singles rolled over with one 20, which one might chuck in one direction when about to be mugged, while simultaneously running in the other direction.

Chinese Poker


13-card-stud.

Chingaderos


The nuts; usually preceded by the.

Chip


1) Poker chips are small round discs used instead of money at the poker table. The ones used at casinos are typically made of clay, while home poker games often substitute cheaper plastic chips. Using chips instead of cash has a number of advantages, mostly just that they're easier to count and manipulate. Color designations for chips are arbitrary, but many casinos use white for $1 chips, red for $5 chips, green for $25 chips, and black for $100 chips. 2) To Bet.

Chip Along


Call, but never raise, all bets; in a no-limit, pot-limit, or spread-limit game, make the smallest bet allowed.

Chip Copper


A thief whose specialty is stealing chips from pots or other players, usually by palming them.

Chip Declaration


In a high-low split game, using chips to indicate whether you're going for high, low, or both. This is done in two ways, either the color of the chips indicates the players' intentions (as red for high, white for low, blue for both ways), or the number of chips (as none for low, one for high, two for both ways).

Chip Girl


A female wearing an apron with pockets full of chips, whose job it is to sell chips to the players, and sometimes to perform other duties, such as collect time, sell drinks, etc. The term chip boy does not exist.

Chip in


Ante, or call a small bet. The term has passed into general usage meaning contribute to a collection, usually of cash.

Chip Person


A person wearing an apron with pockets full of chips, whose job it is to sell chips to the players, and sometimes to perform other duties, such as collect time, sell drinks, etc.

Chip Race


As the limits increase in tournaments, lower denomination chips are taken out of circulation. Rather than rounding odd chips up or down for each player, the players are dealt a card for each odd chip. The player with the highest card is given all the odd chips, which are then colored up.

Chip Rack


A box, or tray, that has indentations to neatly hold chips in (often five) stacks.

Chip Runner


A person wearing an apron with pockets full of chips, whose job it is to sell chips to the players, and sometimes to perform other duties, such as collect time, sell drinks, etc.

Chip the Pot


Take a portion of the pot to cover expenses.

Chip Tray


A box, or tray, that has indentations to neatly hold chips in (often five) stacks.

Chip Up


To exchange one's chips for ones of higher value.

Chippers


Chips. Poker chips are small round discs used instead of money at the poker table. The ones used at casinos are typically made of clay, while home poker games often substitute cheaper plastic chips. Using chips instead of cash has a number of advantages, mostly just that they're easier to count and manipulate. Color designations for chips are arbitrary, but many casinos use white for $1 chips, red for $5 chips, green for $25 chips, and black for $100 chips.

Chippies


Chips. Poker chips are small round discs used instead of money at the poker table. The ones used at casinos are typically made of clay, while home poker games often substitute cheaper plastic chips. Using chips instead of cash has a number of advantages, mostly just that they're easier to count and manipulate. Color designations for chips are arbitrary, but many casinos use white for $1 chips, red for $5 chips, green for $25 chips, and black for $100 chips.

Chip-Rack


Request a player to leave. Comes from what a player usually does before cashing in: fill a chip rack with his chips, and head for the cage. "When the floorman saw Danny come from the cellar, he chip-racked him" means "When the floorman saw Danny deal a card from the bottom of the deck, he asked Danny to cash in (and leave the premises)."

Chips Declare


In a high-low split game, using chips to indicate whether you're going for high, low, or both. This is done in two ways, either the color of the chips indicates the players' intentions (as red for high, white for low, blue for both ways), or the number of chips (as none for low, one for high, two for both ways).

Choice Pots


An announcement, in a home game, by the dealer that the next hand will be dealer's choice.

Chop


To return the blinds to the players who posted them and move on to the next hand, if nobody calls the blind.

Chop a Game


Play for a short time in a game, win a lot of chips, and cash out.

Chop it Up.


An announcement by a player or dealer that the result of the current showdown is a split pot.

Chop the Blinds


In a traveling blind game, when everyone has folded except the two blinds, make an arrangement between those two players not to play out the hand, but instead take back their posted blinds.

Chop-Chop


1) Split a pot in a high-low game. 2) Make an agreement among two (sometimes, rarely, more) to split a pot without having a showdown. 3) Put a chip up for the dealer (as a toke), and instruct the dealer to take half.

Chopper


One who chops. (To return the blinds to the players who posted them and move on to the next hand, if nobody calls the blind.)

Chopping


Playing briefly in each of several games, usually successfully in each.

Chowaha


A hold 'em variant invented in a private game by RGPer Mike Chow, and popularized at BARGE, in which each player gets two down cards, the dealer flops nine cards, arranged in three rows of three, then turns two cards vertically at the ends of the "corridors" between the preceding rows, and rivers one card in the middle and to the right of the two, the whole arrangement forming a large arrow-like structure. Players form their best five-card hand using their two plus any three cards from the four possible five-card board combinations: top row of three plus top card of two plus river card, bottom row of three plus bottom card of two plus river card, middle row of three plus either one of the two turn cards plus river card.

Chump


Inexperienced poker player, sucker.

Chute


The slot on a poker table above the drop box where the dealer places bills that have been exchanged for chips.

Chute Number 1


First position to the left of the dealer, usually describing someone opening the betting from that position. "Here comes an opener from chute number 1."

Cigarette Pot


An arrangement between two or more players to pay for their cigarettes in the same manner as a drink pot.

Cinch


The lock.

Cinch Hand


To lock. Often just cinch.

Cinch Player


One who plays only the nuts (usually used in a derisive sense).

Cincinnati


A form of poker found only in home games, a widow game in which each player receives five cards face down, as does a central area of the table, followed by a round of betting, and then the dealer turns up each central card, one at a time, each followed by another round of betting. At the showdown, each player uses the best five cards among his five and those of the widow. The game is often played high-low split. Also called Utah, Lamebrains, or California. Southern Cross is a variant of Cincinnati.

Circle


Pot boundary. A mythical demarcation within which bets are "legal" and outside of which they are not. In some clubs, an actual circle is drawn on the table. In some clubs, a bet, or a motion to make a bet, is not considered binding unless the chips physically enter the circle; in others, the concept of the circle does not exist.

C-I-X


In lowball, a 6-high hand. When a player shows down a 6-high, he sometimes announces his holding by spelling out, "c-i-x."

Class


Rank of hands.

Clean


1) Honest. "He runs a clean joint." 2) To run out of chips. 3) Win all the money from one or more opponents, or from a game. Also, clean out.

Clean Dealer


Smooth and efficient dealer, usually said of a professional dealer.

Clean Move


A hard-to-detect cheating manipulation, whether by sleight-of-hand or with a cheating device; cleverly concealed misdeal.

Clean Out


Win all the money from one or more opponents, or from a game.

Clean Up


Get rid of the evidence after making a cheating maneuver. A thief may deal himself six cards, and play the best five. When he conceals the extra card among the discards, he is cleaning up. Also called skin the hand.

Clerk


Smooth and efficient dealer, usually said of a professional dealer.

Clip


A cheating device to hold a card up a sleeve or under a table.

Clip Joint


An illegal card room or casino whose denizens include thieves, usually with the consent of the house.

Close


Conservative, tight).

Close to the Chest


Tight. "He plays them close to the vest." Comes from the way players held their cards to avoid their being seen by others.

Close to the Vest


Tight. "He plays them close to the vest." Comes from the way players held their cards to avoid their being seen by others.

Closed Card


Down card.

Closed Game


A game in which no other participants than those currently seated are permitted. In poker, the term usually applies only to private games. In casinos, the term is used for a game, usually blackjack, in which one player is making very large bets, does not want other players interfering with his play, requests to play alone, and the house, wanting his action, accedes.

Closed Hand


A hand consisting of all cards face down. Usually the term refers to a draw poker hand, rarely to no peeky.

Club


1) Any card in the clubs suit. 2) Public card room.

Club Poker


Poker played in a public card room (as opposed to a private game), usually with posted rules and sometimes limited to certain games, such as lowball and draw, according to licensing restrictions.

Club Stakes


Posted rules regarding wagering, usually found in licensed card rooms.

Clubs


1) One of the four suits in a deck of cards, whose symbol is shaped like a shamrock. Originally, clubs may have represented the warrior class, the club being an early weapon. In the traditional deck, clubs are black. In the four-color deck, they are green. 2) A club flush, that is, five cards of the same suit, all clubs. "I've got a straight; whadda you got?" "Clubs."

C-Note


A $100 bill.

Coat Card


An old term for face card. Comes from coated, from the garments worn by the figures. The term was in use until the late seventeenth century, at which point the pronunciation was probably corrupted into court card.

Coaxer


A small raise of an opponent's raise, the object of which is to coax a re-raise from the original raiser, so that the maker of the coaxer can now make his move in the form of a very large raise.

Coffee Housing


An attempt to mislead opponents about one's hand by means of devious speech or behavior.

Coffee Pot


An arrangement between two or more players to pay for their coffee in the same manner as a drink pot.

Coffeehouse


To talk about a hand one is involved in, usually with the intent of misleading or manipulating other players, is coffee housing. It's usually considered just barely on one side of ethical, although which side depend who you ask.

Cojones


The nuts, usually preceded by loss. (Pronounced co-HO-nayss.)

Cold


1) Serial, or in a row. "I caught three cold aces" means the player, in a draw game, drew three cards and (likely) ended up with aces full. 2) Not doing well. 3) Having no action. "No hands coming out: the game's cold."

Cold Bluff


A large bluff made on a weak hand.

Cold Call


To call a raise without having already put the initial bet into the pot.

Cold Deck


A deck, presumably with preset hands in it (usually with several good hands, the best of which will go to the dealer or his confederate), surreptitiously substituted by a cheat for the deck he is supposed to be dealing. So called because, after cards are dealt for awhile, they warm a bit to the touch, while a cold deck actually feels cool.

Cold Game


Dishonest card game.

Cold-Deck


To deal a cold deck; usually to someone. "Those bastards cold-decked me."

Cold-Decker


Thief, generally one who prepares or introduces into a game a cold deck.

Collection


Time.

Collection Drop


Drop.

Collusion


A form of cheating in which two or more players signal their holdings or otherwise form a cheating partnership to the detriment of the other players. Best-hand is a form of collusion.

Color Change


Replacing chips of one color with those of another. Usually implies getting rid of many smaller denomination chips for fewer of a higher denomination.

Color Up


To exchange one's chips for ones of higher value, usually in order to reduce the number of chips one has on the table. In tournaments, players are forced to color up periodically as the tourney money becomes divided among fewer and fewer players and the sizes of the forced bets go up (it makes no sense to play with $25 chips when the blinds are $10000).

Colors


In a draw game, a side bet arrangement between two players. If one is dealt before the draw five cards of the same color (that is, all red, or all black), the other pays him a certain amount. Usually played in conjunction with points, and is more common in lowball than high. This sort of bet arrangement is particularly frowned on by the house, because it involves exposing too many cards, and also slows the game down while comparisons and verifications are made.

Columbia River


In hold' em, K-7 as one's first two cards.

Come


Playing a worthless hand in the hope of improving it is called "playing on the come."

Come Back at


Re-raise; always followed by the name of the player. "He bet $10, I raise him $40, and he came back at me."

Come Back on


Break one hand, and make a better hand; with reference to the hand made. "I broke the 8 and came back on a slick 7." "I started with a pat straight, and four to a straight flush. When Mary stood pat ahead of me, I knew she had the straight beat, so I drew one and came back on a flush; sure enough, she had an ace-high straight, and I won."

Come Bet


A bet made on the come.

Come Down


1) Happen. "This is how it came down." 2) Show down. "I had a full house, and he came down with four of a kind."

Come Hand


A hand which must improve in order to have a realistic shot is a come hand.

Come in


Call, usually referring to any betting round but the last.

Come in Cold


Call a bet and one or more raises without yet having any money in the pot.

Come in for a Raise


Open for more than the minimum. In a limit game, this means open for two bets.

Come in Light


Get into a pot with a poor hand.

Come in on the Blind


Sit down at the precise moment it is your turn to put in the big blind. Some clubs do not let a new player (new to the particular game) be dealt in until it is his turn to put in the blind, supposedly to prevent his getting any "free" hands. Also, if a seated player has missed the blind in a particular round, he can receive his next hand only in the blind position.) In such a case, a player must come in on the blind, or, if not in the big blind position, over blind to receive a hand. Also see blind.

Come Off


Break the top one or more cards of an otherwise pat lowball hand. "When he stood pat, I knew my hand was no good, so I came off both the 9 and the 8" means that a player has something like 9-8-4-2-A, threw the 9 and the 8, and drew cards to the 4-2-A.

Come Over the Top


To raise or re-raise an opponent's bet.

Commit Fully


To put in as many chips as necessary to play your hand to the river, even if they're your case chips.

Common Card


One card dealt to the center of the table and considered part of each active player's hand.

Community Cards


Face-up cards that are shared by all the players in a hand. Flop games have five community cards.

Community Pot


Family pot.

Comoque


In lowball, to pair. This comes from pan, in which you can draw a card of the same rank as one in your hand and not be able to use the drawn card. Sometimes spelled komoke.

Comoquer


In lowball, a card that pairs one in your hand. "I drew to a bicycle and caught a comoquer."

Complete Bluff


A bluff made with a hand that has no potential in succeeding rounds, and cannot possibly win if called.

Complete Hand


A hand that is defined by all five cards: a straight, flush, full house, four of a kind, or straight flush etc.

Complete the Bet


When an all-in player initiates the betting with a bet that is less than the current limit, the next player can complete the bet by bringing it up to the limit.

Complimentary Play


Giving someone action where it is not necessarily warranted.

Computer Hand


1) Any hand that computer analysis/simulation determines is positive but turns out to be difficult to play in practice. 2) In hold 'em, Q-7 as one's first two cards. Comes from an apocryphal story that "someone" did an extensive computer simulation of hold 'em hands in which those two cards appeared most frequently in the flop, or, in some stories, among the down cards. The simulation was atypical, however, because the chances are the same for any two cards of different ranks.

Concave


A card trimmed such that its middles are narrower than its ends.

Concave Card


A card trimmed such that its middles are narrower than its ends.

Concealed


Pertaining to cards in the hole that complete a hidden, winning hand. In seven-card stud, concealed trips would be three hole cards of the same rank, a hand that other players might not suspect.

Concealed Hand


A hand played in such a way that you would not suspect it of being very good, but that turns out to be so.

Concealed Pair


In stud, a pair, both cards of which are among a player's first two down cards.

Confederate


An accomplice or partner of a thief.

Connector


Cards of consecutive ranks, especially pocket cards, are connectors. If they're also of the same suit, they're suited connectors - A hold'em starting hand in which the two cards are one apart in rank.

Consecutive Declaration


In a high-low split game, a method of indicating, prior to the showdown, whether you're going for high, low, or both. In home and private games, such declaration is usually done simultaneously, by everyone, for example, opening his hand at once to reveal none, one, or two chips, representing, respectively, low, high, or both ways (sometimes called scoop or hog).

Conservative


Describing a player, or the play of one, who does not bet unless it is very likely that he has the best hand.

Convex


A card trimmed such that its middles are narrower than its ends.

Convex Card


A card trimmed such that its middles are narrower than its ends.

Cooler


Cold deck.

Cop Checks


Steal chips out of pots, usually done by a check cop.

Corner Bend


A crimp on the corner of a card, for identification by a cheat.

Corner Seat


In a game dealt by a house dealer, either one of the two seats next to the dealer.

Cosmetics


Markings put on the backs of cards with wax, paint, ink, or some other fluid, even smudges, so that a thief can read the ranks (and sometimes suits) of the cards from the back; alterations made to the natural design on the backs of the cards.

Count Down


Count someone's chips (usually in a no-limit game), often when all have been bet, to determine how much is required to make a call.

Count Down the Stub


In a draw poker or lowball game, after dealing all the cards, including those drawn by participants, count the remainder of the deck to ensure that the deck contains the correct number of cards. This is done as a protection against someone possibly holding out.

Count Someone Down


Determine the total value of a player's chips. When, in a no-limit or pot-limit game, someone bets an amount equal to another player's stack, that player may say, "Did you count me down?"

Countdown Hand


In lowball, a hand tied in its top three or four cards.

Counter


An old term for a chip.

Counterfeit


In Omaha Hi/Lo, when the board pairs your key low card, demoting the value of your hand - In flop games, when your great hand is subsequently made less powerful because of cards that hit the table (especially cards that duplicate the strength of your hand), your hand is said to be counterfeited.

Counterfeited


In a high-low split community card game, having one of one's low cards duplicated on the board, thus considerably weakening one's hand, because it is now much easier for another player to tie or beat the hand.

Country Straight


In high draw poker with the joker, an open-ended straight draw, that is, one that can be improved by only nine cards, as 4-5-6-7 of mixed suits, which becomes a straight with any 3, 8, or the joker, or a straight draw that can be improved by only eight cards, as 4-5-joker-8, which is helped by any 6 or 7. In high draw poker without the joker or seven-card stud, an open-ended straight draw, that is, one that can be improved by only eight cards, as 4-5-6-7 of mixed suits, which becomes a straight with any 3 or 8 .

Court Card


A jack, queen or king.

Courtesy Bet


A bet made in a situation in which a bet is not mandated, and sometimes implying a bet that should not be sensibly made. In a no-limit lowball game, Jim opens and Curly raises. Jim calls and draws two cards, and Curly draws one. Jim makes a smooth 8, and says, "I'll give you a courtesy bet." The bet is small, and the implication is that Curly will now raise. A courtesy bet often occurs in the same situation in which a protection bet is made.

Courtesy Play


Giving someone action where it is not necessarily warranted.

Cow


Go half and half with a player on his buy-in to a game; usually preceded by go; sometimes followed by up. When the player quits, he splits with the person with whom he went cow. Sometimes the house goes cow with a player to enable him to get into a larger game than he could otherwise afford, generally with the no altruistic purpose of filling what would otherwise be a shaky game. At some point when the player (the house hopes) gets far enough ahead of the game, the house may split him out, that is, remove half of his chips and put him on his own.

Cow Up


Go half and half with a player on his buy-in to a game; usually preceded by go; sometimes followed by up. When the player quits, he splits with the person with whom he went cow. Sometimes the house goes cow with a player to enable him to get into a larger game than he could otherwise afford, generally with the no altruistic purpose of filling what would otherwise be a shaky game. At some point when the player (the house hopes) gets far enough ahead of the game, the house may split him out, that is, remove half of his chips and put him on his own.

Cowboy


A king.

Crab


Three (the card); so called because a 3 looks like it has pincers.

Crabs


In hold 'em, 3-3 as one's first two cards.

Crack


To beat a powerful hand.

Cracked


Beat, referring to a particular hand.

Crank


Start a game; usually followed by up.

Crank it Up


Play fast, that is, lively or loosely.

Crank One Up


Start a new game.

Crazy Pineapple


A variant of pineapple in which players do not discard one of their down cards until after the flop, at which point the game proceeds as in ordinary hold 'em.

Crier


One who complains a lot while playing, usually about his bad luck.

Crimp


Bend one or more cards in such a way as to force the deck to be cut to the spot desired by a cheat.

Crimp Artist


A cheat who crimps cards.

Crimper


A cheat who crimps cards.

Cripple


In hold 'em, have most of the cards that would make someone else a hand based on the current board, such that you are not likely to get action; usually followed by the deck.

Criss-Cross


X marks the spot.

Crossfire


Perform the action of two players who keep raising and re-raising each other, while one player between them keeps having to call further bets to remain in the pot. This can happen in a high-low game in which one player has an excellent high, another thinks he has a lock on low, and a third is trying to make a hand that he thinks will beat one or both of them. While a whipsaw situation may be quite honest, it sometimes also involves collusion between the raisers for the purpose of extracting the maximum from the sandwiched player. To prevent this sort of situation, most card rooms limit the number of raises in any one round in limit games. Comes from the action of two men wielding a whipsaw (a large, two-handled crosscut saw) to cut down a tree.

Crossroader


1) Thief, particularly one who moves from club to club looking for ways to cheat. 2) Rounder (A professional player who "makes the rounds" of the big poker games in the country.).

Cry


Complain a lot while playing.

Crying Call


A call made with little chance of ultimately winning, but marginally better than an immediate fold.

Crying Winner


One who complains a lot while playing, even, and particularly, while winning, probably to convince others that he's losing when he is in fact doing the opposite. Someone with a reputation as a crying winner usually fools no one, and usually alienates most players, who wouldn't particularly mind his winning if he would only shut up.

Cull


Perform the cheating move of arranging cards prior to shuffling, in such a way that their order can be set, so that by various methods of slSeven-of-hand the cheat can give himself or his partner winning cards, and, perhaps, slightly worse cards to a mark.

Curse of Mexico


The two of spades.

Cut


Separate the deck into two packets, after the cards have been shuffled, usually by the player to the right of the dealer, in player-dealt games, or by the house dealer in games dealt by a house dealer, after which the former bottom half is placed atop the former top half, and then the cards are dealt.

Cut Cards


Participate in a quick method of determining the player to first deal when a game starts, or apportion odd chips at the end of a private game. Each player takes a portion of the deck, similar to the way a cutter cuts the deck, and then turns up his section so that its bottom card is exposed; the player who cuts either the highest or, by agreement, the lowest, card wins.

Cut Checks


Divide stacks of chips into equal amounts, often smaller stacks of five. This is the method pit dealers and cage persons count chips for the purpose of paying off a winning bet or changing the chips to cash, or poker dealers use to count a bet or change chips from a small to a larger denomination.

Cut for High Card


Participate in a quick method of determining the player to first deal when a game starts, or apportion odd chips at the end of a private game. Each player takes a portion of the deck, similar to the way a cutter cuts the deck, and then turns up his section so that its bottom card is exposed; the player who cuts either the highest or, by agreement, the lowest, card wins.

Cut for the Deal


Cut cards to see which player will be dealt the first hand.

Cut it Up


To split the pot after a tie.

Cut Out


1) Split out. 2) Terminate a partnership.

Cut Someone Out


Split out.

Cut Someone Up


1) Participate, by two partners, in a whipsaw situation. 2) Cheat a player, usually by two or more thieves.

Cut the Cards


Participate in a quick method of determining the player to first deal when a game starts, or apportion odd chips at the end of a private game. Each player takes a portion of the deck, similar to the way a cutter cuts the deck, and then turns up his section so that its bottom card is exposed; the player who cuts either the highest or, by agreement, the lowest, card wins.

Cut the Deck


Participate in a quick method of determining the player to first deal when a game starts, or apportion odd chips at the end of a private game. Each player takes a portion of the deck, similar to the way a cutter cuts the deck, and then turns up his section so that its bottom card is exposed; the player who cuts either the highest or, by agreement, the lowest, card wins.

Cut the Game


Take a portion of the pot to cover expenses.

Cut the Game Down


Reduce the stakes, usually at the request of the players.

Cut the Pot


Take a portion of the pot to cover expenses.

Cut Up


Split out.

Cutoff Seat


The position to the right of the button, particularly when the button plays in a given hand.

Cutout


A card marked by scraping its back or otherwise removing some of the ink.

Cutout Work


Markings placed on cards by scraping off part of the design on their backs.

Cutter


The person who cuts the deck.

Cutthroat Game


A, usually, high-stakes poker game, in which the prime objective of the players is to win money. Also called cutthroat game. The opposite of a social game.

Cutthroat Poker


1) A, usually, high-stakes poker game, in which the prime objective of the players is to win money. Also called cutthroat game. The opposite of a social game. 2) Playing poker primarily for money, as opposed to social reasons.

Cutting


Performing a cut (of the deck, prior to dealing).

Cutting Cards


Participate in a quick method of determining the player to first deal when a game starts, or apportion odd chips at the end of a private game. Each player takes a portion of the deck, similar to the way a cutter cuts the deck, and then turns up his section so that its bottom card is exposed; the player who cuts either the highest or, by agreement, the lowest, card wins.

Cutting the Cards


Participate in a quick method of determining the player to first deal when a game starts, or apportion odd chips at the end of a private game. Each player takes a portion of the deck, similar to the way a cutter cuts the deck, and then turns up his section so that its bottom card is exposed; the player who cuts either the highest or, by agreement, the lowest, card wins.

D


Diamonds (the suit), in written text. Jd, for example, is the jack of diamonds.

Dame


Queen (the card).

Dance Every Set


Play every hand, or appear or claim to.

Dark


1) Without looking at your cards. "I'll open dark." "He made a dark bet." 2) Check without looking; always followed by it. "I'll dark it" means "I have not looked at my cards and I shall check" and implies that the speaker is drawing to a powerhouse (in high draw poker) or to a must-call hand.

Dark Bet


A blind bet.

Darken


Bet without looking at your cards. "I'll open dark." "He made a dark bet."

Darth Vader


In hold 'em, the two black fours (the "dark force") as one's first two cards.

Daub


Markings put on cards with paint, ink, or some other fluid. Also called cosmetics.

Dauber


A thief who uses daub.

David


The king of spades. Probably comes from the Biblical King David

Day


One of the three shifts in a 24-hour card room or casino, the shift between graveyard and swing. Day shift usually starts anywhere between 8 and 10 am and ends eight hours later. "When do you work?" "I'm on days."

Day Shift


One of the three shifts in a 24-hour card room or casino, the shift between graveyard and swing. Day shift usually starts anywhere between 8 and 10 am and ends eight hours later.

Days


One of the three shifts in a 24-hour card room or casino, the shift between graveyard and swing. Day shift usually starts anywhere between 8 and 10 am and ends eight hours later. "When do you work?" "I'm on days."

Dead


A dead card is a card that is no longer available to help you.

Dead Blind


1) A blind bet, the holder of which cannot raise unless the pot is already raised. 2) A blind that the winner of a pot does not get to keep; instead, he must put it back in the next pot. A winner blind is an example of a dead blind.

Dead Button Rule


The rule that the button doesn't move if the small blind position leaves.

Dead Card


A card no longer legally playable.

Dead Draw


See Drawing Dead.

Dead Game


A game full of mostly house players (that is, with few or even no live players).

Dead Hand


A hand no longer legally playable, due to some irregularity.

Dead in the Pot


Having no way of winning a particular pot.

Dead Man's Hand


1) Two pair, aces and eights. 2) The black aces, black eights and nine of diamonds. The hand Wild Bill Hickok was holding when he was shot to death.

Dead Money


Money contributed to the pot by players who have folded.

Dead Spread


A Dead game.

Dead Wreck.


Red deck. This is a spoonerism that you hear card room clowns use when they ask the house for a new deck.

Deadwood


The discards; used cards out of play. "Push the deadwood. It's my turn to deal." Sometimes called timber.

Deal


To deal is to give out the cards during a hand. The person who does this is called the dealer. At most public card rooms, a dealer is hired for this purpose (and for generally running the game). At most private games, players take turns dealing.

Deal a Slug


Deal from a deck with a slug in it, in the manner described under slug, or with the slug at the bottom, and the dealer deals from the bottom as required to place those cards into his, a confederate's, or a victim's hand.

Deal Bottoms


Perform a cheating maneuver in which a card manipulator deals cards from the bottom of the deck.

Deal in


Specifically include a particular player while dealing. "Deal me in. I'm just getting up for a cup of coffee. I'll be back before the cards are out." (He's usually not back in time.)

Deal Off


Take the deal and then leave the table. In some games, a player must go through the entire set of blinds in each round in which he has a hand. If he deals off, he can come back in any position, or, in some clubs, in any position only in the round in which he dealt off.

Deal Out


1) Skip a player while dealing. "Deal me out; I have to go to the bathroom." 2) Play the last hand or the last round of a session, usually used only in private games

Deal Seconds


Perform a cheating maneuver in which a card manipulator deals cards not from the top of the deck, but from directly beneath the top card.

Deal Yourself


Deal-yourself game, in which each player in turn physically distributes the cards. "We have no dealers; it's deal yourself."

Dealer


In a game without a house person to run the game and deal the cards, the dealer is the person who physically distributes the cards.

Dealer Advantage


In a draw poker game, before the draw, the dealer gets information about how everyone bets before it is his turn to act, at the draw, about how many cards they take, and, again, after the draw, about how they bet. In hold 'em-type games in which the betting each round proceeds from the dealer's left and around, the dealer finds out how each player acts on his hand before himself having to act. This positional edge is called dealer advantage.

Dealer Blind


1) In a three-blind traveling blind game game, the blind put up by the player in the dealer position. 2) The player who is in the dealer blind position.

Dealer Button


In all flop games, a small disk used to signify the player in the last position if a house dealer is used; a buck.

Dealer Control


A facetious term used by a dealer who wins a large pot to imply that he won by "controlling" the cards (jokingly implying that he is cheating).

Dealer Edge


In a draw poker game, before the draw, the dealer gets information about how everyone bets before it is his turn to act, at the draw, about how many cards they take, and, again, after the draw, about how they bet. In hold 'em-type games in which the betting each round proceeds from the dealer's left and around, the dealer finds out how each player acts on his hand before himself having to act. This positional edge is called dealer edge.

Dealer-Advantage Game


Any poker game with dealer advantage, such as draw poker or a replacement high-low stud game in which players replace unwanted cards sequentially starting to the left of the dealer.

Dealer's Choice


A game in which each dealer, in turn, chooses the type of poker to be played.

Dealing


Distributing cards to each player in a card game.

Deal-Yourself Game


A game in which each player in turn physically distributes the cards.

Dean


A gambler who has the ability to calculate the odds, particularly in card games. Also, professor.

Decision


The resolution, usually by a house employee, of a dispute in a poker room.

Deck


1) The 52 cards (53 if the joker is used) from which poker is played, consisting of four suits (clubs, diamonds, hearts, spades), each with 13 ranks (A or ace, 2 or deuce, 3 or trey, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, T or 10, J or jack, Q or queen, K or king). 2) The undealt portion of the cards, sometimes also called the deck, stock, or talon.3) Throw away your cards. "If you bet over $10, I'm going to deck this hand."

Declaration


1) Verbal showdown. If prior to showing your cards you say, "I have a full house," that statement is a declaration. 2) In a high-low split game, using chips or voice to indicate whether you're going for high, low, or both. Such a declaration is usually done after all the betting is over, and is either consecutive or sequential. This is not common in public card rooms, where high-low split games are usually played in what is called cards speak.

Declare


In high/low games, declaring one's hand as high or low or both ways (usually done with chips in hand). Usually played in home games.

Declare Games


Games in which a player must declare the value of his hand in order to claim the pot.

Deep


1) With respect to a lowball hand, the rank of the top card of the hand one is trying to make when that card is lower than another draw one could make.

Defensive Bet


A small bet (usually made in no-limit poker) to protect one's hand, generally so as not to have to call a much larger bet, or to limit a potential loss.

Denomination


The rank of a card.

Dent


Perform a cheating maneuver consisting of marking the back of a card with a fingernail or by bending a corner. Also, round.

Deuce


Twos are sometimes called deuces. So 22277 can be called deuces full of sevens.

Deuce Dealer


A mechanic (card manipulator) whose specialty is dealing the second card from the top. The reason for such a move is to hold back the top card, which he knows because he has peeked it, until he can deal it to himself, to a confederate, or to someone he is trying to cheat. Sometimes second dealer. Also called deuce dealer, number two man.

Deuce Player


Someone who usually plays $2-limit.

Deuce to Seven


In a game played for low, deuce to seven usually means that the best low hand is simply the worst poker hand. If you haven't figured it out already, that hand is 75432, with no flush. Deuce to seven lowball is also called Kansas City, or Kansas City lowball.

Deuces Full


A full house consisting of three deuces and another pair.

Deuces Wild


A form of high poker in which the 2s are wild (that is, a 2 can represent any other card for the purpose of forming a better hand: a deuce can pair any other card, fill the "hole" in a straight, make the fifth of four cards to a flush, and so on); usually played as draw poker.

Deuce-to-Seven Lowball


In a game played for low, deuce to seven usually means that the best low hand is simply the worst poker hand. If you haven't figured it out already, that hand is 75432, with no flush. Deuce to seven lowball is also called Kansas City, or Kansas City lowball.

Device


Cheating device.

Devil's Bedposts


The four of clubs.

Devil's Playthings


Cards.

Dewey


1) A request for two cards. When it is her turn to draw cards, and a player says, "Dewey," she means, "Kindly give me two cards." 2) Deuce (the card).

Dewey Duck


Deuce (the card). (In a wonderful pun built on this term, pan players sometimes call a deuce a Gooey Duck.)

Diamond


Any card in the diamonds suit.

Diamond-Back Cards


A standard paper deck for card room use, made by the American Playing Card Company; so called because of a drawing of a large bee on the ace of spades. Since the cards often have a diamond pattern on the back, they are usually called bee-back cards.

Diamonds


1) One of the four suits in a deck of cards, shaped like a rhombus (four-sided figure that resembles a diamond ). Originally, diamonds may have represented the merchant class. In the traditional deck, diamonds are red. In the four-color deck, they are blue. 2) A diamond flush, that is, five cards of the same suit, all diamonds. "I've got a straight; whadda you got?" "Diamonds."

Dig


Produce additional money for betting from one's pocket or elsewhere than on the table in a game not played table stakes. This is rarely permitted in card rooms, but sometimes is in private games.

Dime


1) $10, or a $10 bill. 2) $100, or a $100 bill. 3) $1000, particularly in sports betting.

Dime Store


1) In hold 'em, 10-5 as one's two starting cards. 2) In any high poker game, two pair, 10s and 5s. Also called five and dime. 3) In any high poker game, a full house involving 10s and 5s. 4) In lowball, a 10-5. For all meanings, also called nickels and dimes, Woolworth, or Barbara Hutton.

Dime Stores


In any high poker game, two pair, 10s and 5s. Also called five and dime.

Direction


In a high-low split game, which half of the pot, high or low, a player is contesting.

Discard


1) Throw one or more cards from your hand. 2) In a draw game, a card that was thrown away by a player, to be replaced by another card.

Discard Pile


The place on a poker table where the discards go.

Discards


1) The thrown-away cards, sometimes together with the un-dealt cards that remain in the deck. Sometimes called muck. 2) The area on the poker table where discards lie, prior to being gathered together for the next deal.

Doctor Pepper


A wild-card game with 10s, 4s, and 2s wild. (Those numbers are part of the Dr Pepper logo.)

Doctored Cards


Marked cards.

Dog


1) Throw away, usually followed by it or the hand. "This eight won't win; I better dog it." 2) A person or hand who is not mathematically favored to win a pot. Ant: Favorite.3) Either of the nonstandard five-card hands sometimes given value in a private or home game, a big dog or little dog.

Dollar


$100 or a $100 bill.

Dolly Parton


In hold 'em, 9-5 as one's first two cards. From the movie, 9 to 5, in which she starred.

Dominate


A starting hand that will almost always beat another starting hand is said to dominate that hand.

Dominated


The situation in hold 'em of one hand being significantly ahead of the other, usually because of having the same card in common plus a higher card.

Dominated Hand


A hand that will almost always lose to a better hand that people usually play. For instance, K3 is "dominated" by KQ. With the exception of strange flops (e.g. 3-3-x, K-3-x), it will always lose to KQ

Donate


Put chips into a pot that one doesn't expect to get back. "Oh, you raised it again? Okay, I'll donate."

Donation


Put chips into a pot that one doesn't expect to get back. "Oh, you raised it again? Okay, I'll donate."

Door


1) Door card. 2) The door position in a hand. "I can see what he's got in the door." Also window.

Door Card


A player's first up card in stud games.

Doped Cards


Cards marked on the back with some sort of liquid, such as ink, bleach, and sometimes even water.

Double Ante


In double-limit draw, pertaining to the hand following an unopened pot, in which each player adds an additional ante to the pot, and so the pot contains two antes from each.

Double Belly Buster


1) A five-card combination with two "holes," such that any of eight cards can make it into a straight.

Double Gutshot


Variation of Double Belly Buster. A draw to a broken sequence of cards, in which either of two cards will make the straight.

Double Hand


Pai gow poker.

Double Jackpot


A period of time in a card room that has progressive jackpots for getting certain hands beat (for example, aces full in a hold 'em game) during which the posted payouts are doubled. Usually double jackpot times are at times that otherwise have lower attendance than others, with such promotions being to increase patronage.

Double Limit


Limit draw or lowball as played in Southern California, with bets at one limit before the draw, and bets at twice that limit after the draw.

Double Nuts


In any high-low game, having both the best possible low and high. In a community card game, this means the best possible based on the cards showing.

Double Off


Perform a form of cheating wherein two good hands are dealt, the better going to the dealer or his accomplice. In this case, the sucker has been doubled off.

Double Qualifier


A high-low split game with a qualifier for both low and high, such as seven-card stud high-low, with, for example, the requirement that low is awarded only to an 8-low hand or better and that high is awarded only to a two-pair hand or better. If neither qualifier exists, rules vary as to what happens to the pot.

Double Shuffle


A cheating move, a method of appearing to shuffle the cards without actually disturbing their order.

Double Through


Going all-in against an opponent in order to double your stack if you win the hand.

Double Up


1) Go all in and win the pot. "I was down to my last $100 when I doubled up." "He had a better six than I did and I doubled him up." 2) Go half and half with a player on his buy-in to a game; usually preceded by go; sometimes followed by up. When the player quits, he splits with the person with whom he went cow. Sometimes the house goes cow with a player to enable him to get into a larger game than he could otherwise afford, generally with the no altruistic purpose of filling what would otherwise be a shaky game. At some point when the player (the house hopes) gets far enough ahead of the game, the house may split him out, that is, remove half of his chips and put him on his own.

Double-Ace Flush


In draw poker, a flush topped by an ace and a joker. In some clubs, such a flush used to rank higher than any other flush, but that is not very common.

Double-Barreled Shotgun


A form of poker, a cross between draw and stud. Each player starts with three cards; there is a round of betting; each player receives another card; another round of betting; each player receives a fifth card; another round of betting; then each player draws cards as in draw poker; then each player exposes one card; another round of betting; further cards are exposed, each followed by a round of betting, until each player has but one card face down. The game is played high-low split, and, prior to the showdown, there is a chip declaration. This game has eight rounds of betting, or nine if there is a bet after the declare, and is generally played only in home games. It is sometimes called Texas Tech or Wild Annie.

Double-Dealing


A cheating move in which a dealer gives more cards (usually two at a time rather than one) to his confederate or himself than to the other players. The presumption is the player with more than the requisite number of cards will form his best five-card hand, and then get rid of the one or more excess cards (clean up). The phrase has passed into general usage meaning cheating someone or the public in general

Double-Discard


A cheating move in which a player in a draw game who has more cards than he needs (presumably because he asked for more cards than he discarded) gets rid of the extra card.

Double-Draw London Lowball


A form of London lowball draw with two draws, instead of the usual one in ordinary lowball, and thus having three betting rounds, usually played pot limit

Double-End Straight


Four cards to a straight which can be completed by drawing a card at either end.

Double-Ended Straight


Four cards to a straight which can be completed by drawing a card at either end.

Double-Flop Hold 'em


A new Nevada poker game, hold 'em in which two sets of three cards are turned over after the first round of betting, and then two more to each flop, one at a time. Players can form two different hands in combination with their two hole cards plus enough cards from each flop to form a five-card hand. (Cards cannot be combined from the two flops.) This usually produces two winners per hand, although sometimes the same hand wins both halves of the pot.

Double-Hand Poker


Pai gow poker.

Double-Pop


Raising a raise. "I bet, Jim raised it, and Mary double-popped it."

Double-Suited


In Omaha, having just two suits among your four down cards.

Doubleyou.


A request for two cards. At the time of the draw in a draw game, a player, when asked how many cards he wants, might respond, "Doubleyou," which means, "Kindly give me two cards."

Down


1) Seated (in a game). "Is Jim down?" "Yeah, he's in the eight." (That means, "Is Jim playing somewhere?" "Yes, he's in the $8-limit game.") 2) Losing "How much are you down?" 3) Not exposed; generally applied in reference to a hole card in any stud or hold 'em game. 4) The period of time during which a particular dealer deals at a particular table. "How long is your down?" "Twenty minutes."

Down and Dirty.


What seven-stud players think is a cute description for the final card, so called because it is dealt down and because it is hidden, and thus can change a particular hand's winning potentialities.

Down Card


In stud, hole card, that is, an unexposed part of a player's hand. By extension, in draw, a request for one card ("Dealer, give me a down card"), and please be careful that card is not exposed.

Down Cards


Hole cards.

Down for


Having one's name on a list for a particular game. "Are you down for the big one?" means "Is your name on the list of those players who have signaled their intentions of playing in the largest game in the house?"

Down the River


Seven-card stud.

Down the Road


At another club (which could be a considerable distance away and not necessarily even on the same street). This term is used, rather than naming the establishment, because it's considered bad form to talk about a club other than the one in which you're playing. Also, down there.

Down the Street


At another club (which could be a considerable distance away and not necessarily even on the same street). This term is used, rather than naming the establishment, because it's considered bad form to talk about a club other than the one in which you're playing. Also, down there.

Down There


At another club (which could be a considerable distance away and not necessarily even on the same street). This term is used, rather than naming the establishment, because it's considered bad form to talk about a club other than the one in which you're playing.

Down to the Felt


A player who has lost most of his chips.

Down to the Green


To run out of chips while betting or calling. In table stakes games, a player may not go into his pocket for more money during a hand. If he runs out, a side pot is created in which he has no interest. However, he can still win the pot for which he had the chips.

Doyle Brunson


In Hold'em, 10-2 in the hole. Doyle Brunson twice won the World Series of Poker (1975 and 1976) with those two hole cards.

Drag


1) Scoop in a winning pot. 2) Remove the rake, that is the house cut, from a pot (usually by the house dealer).

Draw


1) High draw poker. 2) The point during the playing of a hand at which active players discard the cards they don't want and receive new ones. "You must bet or fold before the draw." 3) The receiving of draw cards. "What was the draw?" is a request by a player to find out how many cards each player drew. 4) A particular hand you are trying to make, as, a flush draw, which is four cards to a flush. In addition to draw games, this usage is often heard in games other than draw games. 5) Specifically an unmade hand, usually heard in hold 'em and seven-card stud. "I raised him all in because I knew he was on a draw." That is, I knew that at the moment, his hand did not beat mine, but that he was trying to make a straight or flush (which, presumably, would win if he did make it). 6) Receive cards. 7) Not stand pat, as opposed to doing so. "You're pat? Then I've got to draw."

Draw Card


The card that one has received on the draw.

Draw Dead


Draw to a hand that cannot win even if made; sometimes followed by to when referring to the other hand. In lowball, if the other guy has a wheel, and you draw one to a 6-4, you're drawing dead, because you can't win, even if you jam up the hand (make it perfect). You are drawing dead to his hand.

Draw Down


In lowball, draw more than one card so as to be drawing to the best possible hand, instead of drawing fewer cards (generally one) to a poorer hand; sometimes followed by to and a or the hand.

Draw for Deal


Participate in a top-card draw.

Draw for Seats


A method of determining which players sit where, usually the participants in a small tournament. Each player draws a card from the deck, which is often fanned face down on the table, and the holder of the highest card sits in seat 1, the next highest card to that player's left, and so on; often suits are used to break ties (in the bridge order of spades, hearts, clubs, diamonds).

Draw Game


A game in which or a table at which Draw Poker is played.

Draw Live


Draw to a hand that will win if made; sometimes followed by to when referring to the other hand. If the other guy has a flush, and you draw one to two pair, you're drawing live, because you can win with a full house. You are drawing live to his hand.

Draw Lowball


A form of poker in which the lowest hand wins.

Draw Out


To improve your hand so that it beats an opponent who had a better hand than yours prior to your draw.

Draw Player


Someone who plays draw poker (usually exclusively, or in preference to other forms of poker).

Draw Poker


A form of poker in which each player receives five cards and then has the option of discarding one or more of them and receiving new cards in their place.

Draw to


1) In draw poker, draw (that is, receive) cards trying to make a specific hand. "I was drawing to a straight." Or, in lowball, "I was drawing to a seven." 2) Similarly, in hold 'em or seven-card stud hope to make a specific hand. If you have two spades in the hole in hold 'em, and two spades come on the flop, if you stay for the turn and the river, you are drawing to a flush.

Draw Twice


In hold 'em, make an agreement between (usually) two players, prior to the dealing of the river card, that they will play for half the pot at a time, with first one river card dealt and then another. This is usually done when the two hands are closely matched, and for the purpose of lessening the effect of variance.

Drawers


A figurative card magnet. "He's got his drawers on" means he's making all the hands or he's drawing well.

Drawing Dead


A draw in which it is impossible to obtain a winning hand for any of a variety of reasons: an opponent's hand is better than whatever you are drawing to, the card(s) that make your hand are out of play, or (in Hold'em) give an opponent a stronger hand even if it makes yours. Frequently used in the past tense, since one rarely knows it at the time.

Drawing Hand


A hand with which you expect to be on a draw is a drawing hand. Suited connectors in hold'em (e.g., QhJh) are drawing hands, since while they make strong hands (straights and flushes) relatively often, they will rarely make them on the flop.

Drawing Snow


In draw poker or lowball, a planned bluff, wherein someone bets heavily, or raises, before the draw, draws to nothing, and then bets or raises after the draw. If called, he cannot win, because he had no hand to draw to (and thus could not make anything better on the draw). Sometimes called a running snow.

Drink Pot


An arrangement between two or more players that the next of them to win a pot (usually containing a certain amount of profit for the winner of the pot, which amount is often supposed to be at least twice the cost of the drinks) will either buy all of them drinks, or pay for the round that they are ordering at the time the drink pot is proposed

Driver's Seat


The player who is making all the betting and thus appears to hold the strongest hand is said to be in the driver's seat.

Drop


1) The amount taken from each pot that belongs to the house; so called because the house dealer usually drops it into a drop box; often called the rake. 2) The amount taken from each pot towards a jackpot. Sometimes called jackpot drop. 3) The amount represented by the time collection. 4) To fold. "I'll drop."

Drop Box


As part of a poker table, a slide-out tray, or a recessed box with a slide-out top, or a slot beneath which is a metal box, into which the house dealer drops the chips collected each pot for the rake or each designated time period as the time collection.

Drop Game


A game in which the house takes a certain amount, called the drop, from every pot.

Drop-in


Pertaining to a hand that accidentally gets in the way of a double off, and beats the set-up hand. "I dealt him an ace-king flush and myself an ace-king-queen flush, but I got beat by a drop-in full house."

Drum


What players sometimes compare a tight player to, as, "He plays tighter than a drum."

Drummer


A conservative or tight player.

Dry


Out of money; broke.

Dry Pot


A side pot about to be created by the current bet that cannot be won by the player making the bet if anyone calls, in a situation in which that player also cannot possibly win the main pot.

Duck


1) Deuce. 2) Manage to escape a situation in which one might have lost a lot of chips.

Duke


1) The nuts, usually preceded by a. "I wouldn't call that bet with your money; he's got a duke this time." 2) Get rid of (a poker hand). "As soon as I called, he duked his hand.

Dumb End


In hold 'em, the low end of a straight, or a straight that can lose to a higher straight. This is a risky hand to hold or draw to, because someone can easily end up with a higher straight. If you have 5-6 in the hole, and the flop is 7-8-9, you have flopped the ignorant end of the straight, and will lose to anyone starting with 10-J or 6-10. Also called idiot end or ignorant end.

Dummy Up.


1) "Shut up." A cheat may say this to his accomplice when the latter appears to be talking too much. A rounder may say it to another player when the latter seems to be trying to "smarten up the dummies." 2) A command by a floor person to a dealer to stop conversing with the players; sometimes rendered "dummy up and deal."

Duplicated


In a high-low split community card game, having one of one's low cards duplicated on the board, thus considerably weakening one's hand, because it is now much easier for another player to tie or beat the hand.

Dust


Referring to an action made by a house dealer, clap his hands before leaving the table when his replacement arrives to let observing security personnel see that the dealer's hands are empty, that is, the dealer is not stealing any chips or money. The move usually consists of pressing the palms together, sometimes in a wiping motion, and then turning the open palms both upward and downward.

Dutch Straight


A Skip Straight (In draw poker, a nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, cards in a series separated each from the other by one rank, as 2-4-6-8-10, or 5-7-9-J-K. Some play that an ace ranks only high in a skip straight, that is, that A-3-5-7-9 is not considered a skip straight. A skip straight is also called an alternate straight, Dutch straight, or sometimes a kilter. The hand generally ranks between three of a kind and an "ordinary" straight.)

Ear


To bend the corner of a card so it can be recognized from the back by a cheater.

Early Bet


The first bet in a stud game, often set artificially low, that is, lower than the normal betting limits for the game, and often a forced bet.

Early Out


1) In a card room, being permitted to have one's last break from work at the end of the shift, thus allowing the employee (usually a dealer) to leave early. If breaks are 20 minutes, having early out permits the dealer to get off 20 minutes before the shift is over, that is, before the other dealers are done. Often called E.O. 2) Leaving a shift early because there is not enough business to support all the dealers. The shift boss may say, "Who wants early out?" A dealer who wants to go play (cards) may volunteer.

Early Position


A position on a round of betting in which you must act before most of the other players.

Easy Money


Easy pickings in a poker game; money won from inexperienced players.

Edge


An advantage over an opponent, either specific or subjective.

Edge Bet


The bet made by the edge, often a forced bet.

Edge Out


Barely beat another hand.

Edge Work


Markings (or cosmetics) put on the borders of cards with paint, ink, or some other fluid, so that a thief can read the ranks (and sometimes suits) of the cards from the back or side.

Effective Odds


The ratio of the total amount of money you expect to win if you make your hand to the total amount of bets you will have to call to continue from the present round of betting to the end of the hand.

Eight, Skate, and Donate


Describing a (usually) no-limit game whose minimum bet is $8.

Eight-to-go


Describing a (usually) no-limit game whose minimum bet is $8.

Eight-to-Skate


Describing a (usually) no-limit game whose minimum bet is $8.

Eight-Way Hand


1) In the 53-card deck, the joker plus three to a straight with two "holes," so that any of eight cards makes it a straight.

Eight-Way Straight


1) In the 53-card deck, the joker plus three to a straight with two "holes," so that any of eight cards makes it a straight.

El Paso.


I pass.

Elder Hand


Player immediately to the left of the dealer in games that use an automatic betting scheme. Sometimes the player in that position is the last to bet before the draw, which is equivalent to the situation involving an under-the-gun blind.

Eldest Hand


Player immediately to the left of the dealer in games that use an automatic betting scheme. Sometimes the player in that position is the last to bet before the draw, which is equivalent to the situation involving an under-the-gun blind.

Elevator


1) A cheating move during shuffling of cards, in which the dealer offers the pack to be cut, but then restores the deck to its original sequence. 2) A form of widow game found only in home games, in which each player is dealt five down cards, as in draw, followed by a betting round, and then seven cards are arranged in two columns of three, with each turned face up one at a time, plus one card between the two columns (the elevator), turned up last, which can move up or down such that a player can use three across from either column, or either of the three diagonals formed when the elevator is in the middle. Each card exposed is followed by another betting round. Each player makes the best hand possible by using any combination from his five and up to three from the widow in the manner described. Some play that each player may use only two cards from his hand and must use three from the widow. 3) The movable widow card described in definition 2.

Elevator the Cut


A cheating move during shuffling of cards, in which the dealer offers the pack to be cut, but then restores the deck to its original sequence.

Elk River


A hand with three 10s.

Elmer.


Sucker. (Rhyming slang, from "Elmer Tucker.")

End


1) A share given by a cheater to an accomplice. 2) Any share of a poker pot. "I made a seven on the last card and I got the low end of the pot." 3) The bet made during the final round of betting.

End Bet


The final round of betting, usually coming at the point all the cards have been dealt in a stud game or the last community card has been turned up in a hold 'em-type game. Some forms of poker permit a special end bet, as, for example, at a larger limit than in preceding rounds, or with more raises permitted than on earlier rounds.

End Strippers


Cards whose ends have been shaved by a thief so they can be located by feel during manipulation of the deck. These cards are somewhat shorter than ordinary cards, allowing the thief to find them easily. Compare with belly strippers, which are shaved on their sides (long edges).

English Poker


Any of several poker variations, such as London lowball, or stud poker with a final draw permitted.

Equity


The value of a particular hand or combination of cards.

Eubie


In hold 'em, 8-6 as one's first two cards. Supposedly comes from the saying, "If you play these, you be broke."

EV


Expected value. Positive EV is sometimes written EV+, and negative EV, EV-.

Even


Neither winning nor losing; often preceded by get. "If I ever get even, I'm never going to play again." (The rejoinder to this always is, "You were even when you sat down.")

Even-Money


A bet that pays off exactly the amount wagered. E.g., "Double or nothing" is an even-money bet .

Expectation


The long-run advantage of a given situation, specifically without reference to any particular outcome. I.e., what you figure to win or lose on average after a large number of repetitions of the same situation.

Expected Value


Expectation (The long-run advantage of a given situation.) expressed as a dollar amount.

Exposed Card


1) Any card dealt face up, as any of the up cards in a stud game. 2) A card that inadvertently appears face up during the deal in a draw game, or that gets accidentally turned face up. Card rooms have various rules for dealing with such accidental exposures, such as ruling the card dead (that is, not legally playable), dead at some times but not others, and so on.

Exposed Pair


In stud games, any open or visible pair, as opposed to a hidden pair; two cards of the same rank in the face-up position in one player's hand.

Extra Outs


Cards that improve a hand in more ways than the self-evident outs. Both terms (outs and extra outs) are usually used with reference to a hand that needs to improve to win the pot (because it is currently beat by some other hand).

Eyes


In hold 'em, a pair of aces, particularly when they constitute a player's down cards. Also called eyes of Texas.

Eyes of Texas


In hold 'em, a pair of aces, particularly when they constitute a player's down cards.

Face


1) Face card. 2) The front of a card, that is, the side that shows its rank and suit, as opposed to the back. Also called front. 3) Turn face up, as one's card.

Face Card


A jack, queen or king (a card with a face on it, not joker).

Factory Defect


An irregularity in one or more cards, such as misprinted or flawed cards or other unintentional markings, which could permit observant players to identify some (or, rarely, all) of the cards from the back.

False Cut


A cheating maneuver in which the deck appears to be cut, but the stacked portion remains unchanged at the top.

False Openers


A hand that was opened without having opening requirements.

False Shuffle


An appearance of shuffling the cards by a cheat, but without actually changing their order (from a presumably set-up arrangement), by pulling one half of the pack through the other half, and then replacing the deck to its original position.

Family Pot


A pot where all of the players at the table are participating, even after each has had an opportunity to act.

Fan


1) Mix the cards; shuffle the deck. 2) Spread the cards face up on the table in an overlapping fashion. 3) Spread the cards in one's hand in such a way that just the edge of each can be seen; usually done by holding the whole deck so it ends up looking like a fan.

Farm


All one's chips; usually preceded by bet the. When a player goes all in, someone may say, "He's betting the ranch." Also, the ranch.

Fast


To play a hand aggressively, betting and raising as much as possible.

Fast Action


The state of a fast game.

Fast Game


One with a lot of action, that is, with lots of betting, raising, and re-raising from most of the players.

Fast Pace


Fast pace describes a game with a lot of betting and raising, performed by most of the players; slow pace describes a game without much betting and raising.

Fast Peek


1) A quick look at one's cards, done by an angle shooter in such a way as to elude detection (usually with the intention of then claiming to be betting blind). 2) A quick look by a thief at part of the deck.

Fast Player


An aggressive player, one who bets at almost every opportunity. In a no-limit game, one who bets large at almost every opportunity, often on risky propositions. One who bets and raises frequently, in an attempt to drive out timid or conservative players.

Fast Shuffle


An appearance of shuffling the cards by a cheat, but without actually changing their order (from a presumably set-up arrangement), by pulling one half of the pack through the other half, and then replacing the deck to its original position.

Fat


1) Winning. 2) Having money, usually as a result of having had a recent windfall, often in the form of a recent large win. Also, flush.

Fatten


1) Put more chips in the pot; also sweeten. 2) Give one's chips to a particular player; usually followed by up. "I don't know why I keep giving him action; all I do is fatten him up all the time."

Favorite


Before all the cards are dealt, a hand that figures to be the winner.

Feed


Throw money off to someone. "You've been feeding him all day. How about throwing off some chips this way?"

Feed the Kitty


1) Bet or call foolishly, or knowing that one is taking the worst of it. Also, feed the kitty. 2) Call any bet.

Feed the Pot


Bet or call foolishly, or knowing that one is taking the worst of it. Also, feed the kitty.

Feeler


A small bet made to see if anyone will raise or to determine who will just call.

Feeler Bet


A small bet made to see if anyone will raise or to determine who will just call.

Felt


1) The surface of most poker tables is made of some sort of felt, or is in any case referred to as such. 2) A player who is running out of chips rapidly can be referred to as "down to the felt."

Fence Hopper


Someone who comes in cold to a pot, that is, someone who has not yet had the opportunity to call any bets and, when a pot has already been raised, calls the initial bet plus the raise.

Fence Jumper


Someone who comes in cold to a pot, that is, someone who has not yet had the opportunity to call any bets and, when a pot has already been raised, calls the initial bet plus the raise.

Fifth Street


In flop games, the final round of betting and the fifth community card on the board.

Figure


Face card

Filet


Full house.

Filet Gumbo


Full house.

Fill


To draw a card that makes a five-card hand (straight, flush, full house, straight flush).

Fill in


To draw a card that makes a five-card hand (straight, flush, full house, straight flush). "I filled in the flush."

Fill Up


To make a full house either from trips or two pair.

Filly


Full house.

Fin


$5.00

Final Table


When only enough players remain in a tournament to form one full table, that is the final table. Making it to the final table sometimes guarantees a prize.

Finger Poker


A poker game in which players play on credit.

Finky Dink


In hold 'em, 8-5 as one's first two cards.

Finsky


$5.00

Fire


To make the first bet in a betting round. Used to emphasize that the player bet when a check was possible, showing strength.

First Ace


A method of determining, at the start of a game, who will be the first dealer. Someone, the house dealer in a casino game or one of the players in a home game, starts dealing cards one at a time face up to each player, and the player who receives the first ace becomes the dealer.

First Base


The first position to the left of the house dealer in a poker game or at a blackjack table. In poker, also called age.

First Break


In a card room, having a break immediately upon arriving at work, at the start of the shift, so that the employee (usually a dealer) will not be allowed to have early out, that is leave early. First break is often given to a dealer who shows up a bit late for work.

First Jack


Same as first ace, except with a jack being the significant card. (First Ace: A method of determining, at the start of a game, who will be the first dealer. Someone, the house dealer in a casino game or one of the players in a home game, starts dealing cards one at a time face up to each player, and the player who receives the first ace becomes the dealer.)

Fish


A player who plays far too many hands, chases near-impossible cards, prays for luck, and, in the long run, loses money.

Fishhooks


Slang for Jacks.

Five Aces


In any wild-card game, some combination of cards all of the same rank plus one or more wild cards.

Five and Dime


1) In any high poker game, two pair, 10s and 5s. Also called dime store. 2) A wild-card game with 10s and 5s wild.

Five of a Kind


1) The best hand in high draw poker played with the 53-card deck, four aces plus the joker. 2) In any wild-card game, some combination of cards all of the same rank plus one or more wild cards.

Five-Card Draw


1) Draw poker. 2) High draw poker, often called just draw.

Five-Card Option


A form of five-card stud, found only in home games, a high-low game in which, after each player has been dealt one down card and four up cards, each player has the option of replacing one of those cards. (The act of replacing a card is sometimes called the twist, so this game's alternative name is also its description: five-card high-low stud with a twist.) An up card is replaced with an up card, and a down card with a down card, followed by one more round of betting. Also called little squeeze.

Five-Card Stud


A poker game, stud poker with one card dealt face down followed by four cards dealt face up

Five-Minute Rule


A house rule that a player must act on his hand within five minutes, or else give up the hand and have no claim on the pot. This rule is found mainly in no-limit games, and is usually invoked on players who frequently abuse the time limits, that is, when confronted with a large bet, often study the situation for long periods of time. The two-minute rule is similar, though not as common.

Five-Way Hand


In the 53-card deck, four cards to an inside straight, so that any of five cards makes it a straight.

Five-Way Straight


In the 53-card deck, four cards to an inside straight, so that any of five cards makes it a straight.

Fix


To arrange a deck to give one player a huge advantage.

Fixed Deck


A deck that has been arranged to give one player a huge advantage.

Fixed Limit


A betting structure where the amount of each bet is a specific fixed quantity.

Flash


Inadvertently expose one of your hole cards in a stud or community card game, or any of your cards in a draw game.

Flat


1) Crooked. "This joint is as flat as a pancake." That is, it is full of thieves. 2) In lowball, taking no cards; often said by a house dealer when announcing the draws: "One, one, two, and flat."

Flat Call


To call a bet without raising.

Flat Joint


A crooked gaming establishment. Also bust-out joint. Opposite of right joint.

Flat Limit


A betting limit in a poker game that does not escalate from one round to the next.

Flat Shop


A crooked gaming establishment. Also bust-out joint. Opposite of right joint.

Flat Store


A crooked gaming establishment. Also bust-out joint. Opposite of right joint.

Flatten


Turn a formerly honest card room into a flat shop.

Floor


See floor person.

Floor Man


The casino representative in charge of the card room or a section of a card room. Arbitrates disputes when unusual events happen.

Floor Person


In a card room floor people are responsible for the moment to moment management of the card room.

Flop


1) In Hold'em, the first three community cards, dealt simultaneously. 2) To deal a flop, or to make a hand on a flop.

Flop Game


Any of a number of poker games where a flop is dealt.

Flush


A poker hand consisting of five cards all one suit.

Flush Draw


Having four cards of the same suit, and hoping to draw a fifth to make a flush.

Flushing


Drawing to a flush. "I knew you had a straight. I was flushing, but I missed."

Fluss


A poker hand consisting of five cards all one suit.

Flux


A poker hand consisting of five cards all one suit.

Foamy Cleanser


In hold 'em, A-J as one's down cards. Also (and from whose advertising slogan it comes), Ajax.

Foil the Cut


Perform a false cut (A cheating maneuver in which the deck appears to be cut, but the stacked portion remains unchanged at the top.).

Fold


Placing cards face down towards the middle of the table and sitting out the rest of the hand. The cards remain on the table until the hand is finished, and their ante remains in the pot.

Fold Out of Turn


Fold before it is one's turn, an action that is not according to the rules in serious (that is, card room) games.

Follow the Queen


A very popular game that keeps everyone guessing. It plays just like Seven Card Stud with the following exception: The card dealt up after a queen is dealt up is declared a wildcard. This means that if the ^QH is dealt up to the player to your right and then a ^2D is dealt to you, then your deuce and all other deuces are wild.

Follow the Rabbit


A form of draw, usually lowball, in which a player gets a bonus from the other players for winning two pots in a row.

Foot


Poor hand. "I got a hand like a foot."

Football


A wild-card game with 6s and 3s wild. The game is similar to baseball.

Force


Placing a higher wager into the pot. All other players must call that bet--or raise it--in order to remain in the game.

Forced Bet


A bet that one is forced to place, typically a blind bet or a bring-in. In some stud games a player may be required to make a bet to start the action on the first card. This is similar conceptually to blinds and antes, but in this case is dependent on the cards shown rather than player position. Usually the weakest hand is forced to bet.

Forced Blind


A mandatory, as opposed to optional, blind, that is, a bet that must be put into a pot before the cards are dealt, usually for the purpose of stimulating action. Traveling blinds, winner blinds, and requiring players to blind at least once in a specified period of time or per round are examples of forced blinds.

Forced Raise


A mandatory, as opposed to optional, blind, which is put in to the left of a forced under-the-gun blind.

Forced-Move Game


The second game of its type at a specific limit in a public card room that acts as a feeder to the main game, according to rules that vary from card room to card room. As seats become available in the main game, players in the forced-move game must move to the main game. The reason to have forced-move games is to make sure that the main game is always full, as opposed to the balanced-game situation in which two tables might both have vacancies, and yet no one is permitted to change games. Also called must-move game.

Forceful


A full house consisting of three 4s and another pair.

Forest


Three 3s. (A bunch of trees.)

Forward Motion


The act of betting. If someone says, "Motion's good," he probably means, "If that act of reaching for your chips that you are performing is to be interpreted as an actual intention on your part of betting, you can take the pot, because I shall not be calling." Some clubs have a rule motion is binding, which means that if you have chips in your hand and make a motion toward the pot with the hand that holds those chips (also known as a forward motion), you must complete the bet.

Fossil


An elderly poker player (derogatory).

Foul


A hand which may not be played for one reason or another. A player with a foul hand may not make any claim on any portion of the pot.

Foul Hand


A hand that has become foul. In a draw game, six cards after the draw is usually considered a foul hand. Also dead hand, irregular hand.

Foundation


1) In five-card stud, the first card dealt to a player. 2) In seven-card stud, the first two cards dealt to a player.

Four Flush


Four cards to a flush.

Four of a Kind


Four cards of the same denomination.

Four-Card Flush


1) Four cards to a flush. Sometimes called a bobtail flush or Arkansas flush. 2) A nonstandard hand, four cards to a flush, that ranks higher than a four-card straight and lower than two pair.

Four-Card Rush


In lowball, having lots of one-card draws, but not making them.

Four-Card Straight


1) Four cards to a straight. Sometimes called a bobtail straight. 2) A nonstandard hand, four cards to a straight, that ranks higher than one pair and lower than a four-card flush.

Four-Color Deck


A deck in which each suit is given a different color, as opposed to the traditional decks in which hearts and diamonds are red and spades and clubs black. Many claim such a color scheme makes it harder to misread suits. In the four-color deck promoted by Mike Caro (the Mad Genius of Poker), spades are black, hearts are red, diamonds are blue, and clubs are green.

Four-Flusher


A cheater. Probably comes from one who tries to bluff when holding only a four-flush, or who cheats by showing four cards to a flush and tries to claim the pot without showing the fifth.

Fours


Four of a kind.

Four-Spot


A 4 (the card).

Four-Straight


1) Four cards to a straight. Sometimes called a bobtail straight. 2) A nonstandard hand, four cards to a straight, that ranks higher than one pair and lower than a four-card flush.

Fourth Street


In stud poker, the fourth card dealt to each player. Sometimes used to refer to the fourth community card dealt in Hold'em, although the more common term for this is turn.

Four-Way Hand


1) Four cards to a straight. Sometimes called a bobtail straight. 2) A nonstandard hand, four cards to a straight, that ranks higher than one pair and lower than a four-card flush.

Four-Way Straight


In the 52-card deck, four to a straight, so that any of four cards makes it a straight.

Freak


The joker or a wild card.

Freak Draw


An extremely lucky draw, usually greatly defying probability, and often in such a way as to defeat a hand that has considerably the best of it. If, in lowball, you draw three cards and make a 6 or better, that constitutes a freak draw. If, in draw poker, you draw three cards to two cards of the same suit and make a flush, that, too, constitutes a freak draw. Sometimes called Gardena miracle.

Freak Hand


A nonstandard poker hand, as a blaze, skip straight, big dog, little tiger, and so on.

Free Card


A card that a player gets without having to call a bet.

Free Look


In draw poker or lowball, a player has looked at the first four of his cards, and the remaining card, which he presumably has not seen, is the free look. (I say "presumably" because some players seem to have a free look every hand, and yet they always look at the first four dealt them in order.) You might in lowball hear a player say, "I've got a free look, and I'm gonna raise it." That gives others the impression that the player has raised without seeing the fifth card, but hardly anyone ever believes that.

Free Peek


Free look. "How come the free peek is always in the last position?"

Free Ride


To stay in a hand without being forced to bet.

Freeroll


A situation in which two players have the same hand, but one of the players has a chance to better his hand.

Free-Roll Tournament


A tournament with no buy-in, usually with prize money put up by the house. Generally players must qualify to play in such a tournament by playing a specified number of hours during a set period of time, such as 10 hours in a week or 40 hours in a month. Sometimes entries to a free-roll tournament are also awarded to players holding certain hands, such as aces full or better, or the winners of preliminary tournaments, or to those who enter one or more other tournaments.

Freeze


Stand pat in draw poker, that is, refuse on the draw to replace any cards.

Freeze-Out


A table-stakes game that continues until a small number of players (possibly only one) has all the money. The major event in The World Series of Poker is a freeze-out game - A game or tournament in which all players start with the same amount and play until one player has won all the chips.

Freeze-Out Tournament


A tournament in which players start with a specified amount and then can buy no further chips; once they lose their chips, they are out, as opposed to a re-buy tournament. The tournament continues until one player has all the chips. As players are eliminated, they may receive prizes based on the order of their elimination.

Friendly Game


A private or home poker game in which the social aspect is more important than winning money, usually accomplished by permitting only relatively small bets. This is opposed to a cutthroat game or a club or casino game. Sometimes called social game.

From Here to There


A straight, sometimes shortened to here to there; itself shortened from from here to there without a pair.

Front


1) Ahead (of the game, that is, winning); always preceded by in. "How ya doin'?" "I'm in front." 2) Being in a position such that you act after another player. If you are sitting to the left of a player, you might say, "I'm in front of him." 3) The front of a card, that is, the side that shows its rank and suit, as opposed to the back. Also called face.

Front Peek


A cheating maneuver that enables the dealer to see the face of the top card on the deck, accomplished by squeezing the deck between thumb and little finger in such a way as to bow the top card slightly so that its underside corner can be surreptitiously viewed. This move is made prior to dealing seconds.

Full


1) Full house. "I've got a full." 2) Having a full house. "I've got a flush; whadda you have? "I'm full."

Full Bet


1) In a limit game, a bet as large as the current limit.

Full Boat


Full House.

Full Buy


A buy-in equivalent to at least the minimum requirement for the particular game.

Full Deck


An honest deck, that is, one containing all the cards. From this came the phrase playing with a full deck, which originally meant playing honestly, but was later expanded to mean rationally, and usually used in the negative as not playing with a full deck, that is, crazy or crazily.

Full Hand


A hand consisting of 3-of-a-kind and a (different) pair.

Full House


A hand consisting of 3-of-a-kind and a (different) pair.

Full of


Describing the constitution of the pair in a full house, as three kings and two threes could be called kings full of 3s.

Full Pack


An honest deck, that is, one containing all the cards. From this came the phrase playing with a full deck, which originally meant playing honestly, but was later expanded to mean rationally, and usually used in the negative as not playing with a full deck, that is, crazy or crazily.

Full Table


A table whose every seat is occupied. The term is usually used only in card rooms.

Full Wrap


In Omaha, a situation in which the four down cards consist of two sets of consecutive cards, two gaps, and two more consecutive cards, which combine with the flop such that any card in your hand duplicated on the board on the turn or river gives you a straight, in addition to any card one lower than your lower consecutive cards or one higher than the higher consecutive cards.

Fuzz


1) Perform a cheating maneuver in which the cards are mixed by an overhand shuffle (from hand to hand, instead of the standard card room procedure of riffling) in such a way as to maintain their original order. 2) In draw poker, shuffle through one's five cards repeatedly by holding them face down and sliding one card at a time from top to bottom. Also called milk the cards.

Fuzz the Deck


Mix the cards by repeatedly drawing two simultaneously from top and bottom of the deck, sometimes done with a new deck prior to shuffling.

Gaff


1) A cheating device or method, such as a holdout machine or marking the cards. 2) To use such a device or method. To gaff the cards could mean to mark them by any of several means.

Gallery


1) Watchers; onlookers; spectators on the rail observing the action at a particular table or at a tournament. 2) Any hand having lots of picture cards.

Gamble


1) Loose play, or the desire to play other than tight. "He must have a lot of gamble in him, because he never lets any of it out." Also, bounce, jump.2) Play loosely. Note : This word has special meaning among poker players, and is different from the more generalized definition of the word as found in most dictionaries.

Gambler


One who takes chances in a poker game. According to Doyle Brunson, in his Super System, this term "... is often used to describe the class (that is, the quality) of a poker player. When the word is used this way it describes the highest class of player--which actually means that the player is not really a gambler at all, but a highly skilled player."

Game


1) A specific poker game, in the sense of a table full of players (not in the sense of a variety of poker). "Good game on table three." 2) The specific form of poker being played; sometimes the size of a game. "Table 4 is a an Omaha game." "This is a 6-12 game." 3) A reference to the locale or format of a poker game, as a home game or private game.

Game Starter


A card room employee who plays with House money, and does not share in any of his (her) winnings or losses. Shills are used to facilitate starting games, and keeping them going.

Game Theory


Betting or calling in a certain way when you don't know how an opponent plays so as to prevent the opponent from obtaining an edge by his own betting or calling. Against an opponent whose play you are familiar with, you bluff more or less often depending on what you know of his calling habits. Against one whose habits you don't know, though, you use game theory.

Gap


1) A missing card in a hand, particularly in the middle of an inside straight.2) Empty seat. When a table has one or more empty seats, the dealer or one of the seated players may try to entice a prospective participant this way: "Siddown. There's a gap in the trap for a sap."

Gaper


A cheating device, a mirror or other shiny object, such as a highly-polished cigarette lighter, placed apparently innocently on the table, used to read the reflected faces of the cards while they are being dealt. Also gleamer, shiner, or reflector.

Gar Hole


A term that describes the situation in which chips are locked up (Pertaining to chips residing in the stack of a very tight player, and thus difficult for any other player to win). "You'll never get any of his chips; they're in a gar hole."

Garbage


1) The discards. "Pass the garbage; my deal next." 2) Poor hand. "Hey, dealer; can't you give me anything but garbage?"

Garbage Pile


Discard pile in which all cards are dead.

Gardena Miracle


An extremely lucky draw, usually greatly defying probability, and often in such a way as to defeat a hand that has considerably the best of it. If, in lowball, you have a pat 6-4, and I make the blind good and draw three cards and make a wheel, you will be justified in accusing me of having been blessed with a Gardena miracle. In draw poker, you can also draw three cards to two cards of the same suit and make a flush and also be considered to have made a Gardena miracle. Many players consider drawing two and making a straight flush or even a flush also to fall into the class of Gardena miracle, but that is more correctly called a cat hop. Also, freak draw. Named after the city of Gardena, in Southern California, which was once known as the poker-playing capital of America.

Gardena Razz


A form of lowball draw that used to be popular in Gardena, played as winner blind. This form of lowball is no longer very common, and the term razz usually refers to seven-card stud lowball

Gardena-Style


Pertaining to double-limit games; so called because these games originated in the Gardena area.

George


Good, great. "Sit down. It's a George game." Opposite of Tom

Georgia Hoop.


Terrific. When someone says this, you know he's pleased about something.

Georgy


Good, great. "Sit down. It's a George game." Opposite of Tom

Get a Game Down


Start a game. A floor person might say, "As soon as we get one more player, we're going to get a 20-40 down."

Get a Hand Cracked


Have a good hand beaten, usually by an opponent going against the odds.

Get Full Value


Betting, raising and re-raising in order to manipulate the size of the pot so that you will be getting maximum pot odds if you win the hand.

Get Hit with the Deck


Be in a situation of making every hand or having good hands in crucial pots, particularly when large pots are involved.

Get it Fixed.


"You lose." This is what an uncouth player says about another player's hand when he spreads his own better hand

Get One's Feet Wet


Get into a pot, probably losing it.

Get Out


1) Fold. "Two raises to me? I'll get out." 2) Get even. (Win after having been losing, particularly if the period of being behind was lengthy.) "I had to get stuck $2000 before I managed to get out."

Get Smooth


The point at which a rough lowball hand becomes not-so-rough.

Get the Right Price


The pot odds are favorable enough for you to justify calling a bet or a raise with a drawing hand.

Get There


To make your hand.

Get Well


1) Win a big pot that puts one even or ahead. "I flopped four sixes and beat two full houses. That pot got me well." 2) Win after having been losing, particularly if the period of being behind was lengthy.

Gilroy


Three 10s, from the phrase San Jose to Gilroy. Also, from here to Gilroy.

Gin


In lowball, when a player says "Gin!" it means he has a wheel (A-2-3-4-5).

Girl


Queen (the card). Also, lady, mop squeezer

Git-go


Start; usually preceded by from the. "He had four girls right from the git-go."

Give a Card


Permit a free ride, that is, in stud poker or hold 'em, not bet on a particular round, so that opponents can get another card without having to call a bet.

Give Action


Betting, calling, raising or re-raising.

Give Air


Inadvertently exposing cards; usually part of the phrase put air into [a hand]. "You'll like sitting next to Johnny; he puts a lot of air into his hand." That is, if you sit next to Johnny, the way he holds his cards you can often see some of them, which, presumably, gives you an edge (albeit an unethical one) on him.

Give Away


Revealing one's hand by obvious play.

Give Someone a Card


Let an opponent have a free card (A card that a player gets without having to call a bet. ).

Glass-Work


Use by a cheating dealer of a mirror or other reflective device (such as a shiner) to read the faces of the cards while they are being dealt face down.

Glazed Card


A card that has been sanded slightly, to allow a cheating dealer to find it among the others card.

Gleamer


A cheating device, a mirror or other shiny object, such as a highly-polished cigarette lighter, placed apparently innocently on the table, used to read the reflected faces of the cards while they are being dealt. Also, gaper, shiner, reflector

Glim Worker


A cheater who uses glass-work (Use by a cheating dealer of a mirror or other reflective device (such as a shiner) to read the faces of the cards while they are being dealt face down).

Glimmer


A cheating device, a mirror or other shiny object, such as a highly-polished cigarette lighter, placed apparently innocently on the table, used to read the reflected faces of the cards while they are being dealt. Also, gaper, shiner, reflector

Glue


A sticky substance a thief rubs on his palm to permit chips to stick to the palm without having to close his fingers around the chips. Also, check cop.

G-Note


A one thousand dollar bill.

Go


The current betting level (amount it takes to enter the pot), as in "$20 to go" meaning every player must contribute $20 (total) or drop. A $10 raise would then make the pot "$30 to go".

Go All in


To run out of chips while betting or calling. In table stakes games, a player may not go into his pocket for more money during a hand. If he runs out, a side pot is created in which he has no interest. However, he can still win the pot for which he had the chips.

Go Both Ways


In a high-low split game, use chips or voice to indicate you're going for both high and low simultaneously.

Go Cow


Go half and half with a player on his buy-in to a game; usually preceded by go; sometimes followed by up. When the player quits, he splits with the person with whom he went cow. Sometimes the house goes cow with a player to enable him to get into a larger game than he could otherwise afford, generally with the no altruistic purpose of filling what would otherwise be a shaky game. At some point when the player (the house hopes) gets far enough ahead of the game, the house may split him out, that is, remove half of his chips and put him on his own.

Go for it


1) Perform a cheating maneuver with the deck. If a bottom dealer goes for it, it means he is just in the process of dealing a bottom. 2) Draw to a hand. "What's it cost me? I'm going to go for it."

Go for the Bottom


Deal a card from the bottom of the deck.

Go Hog


In a high-low split game, use chips or voice to indicate you're going for both high and low simultaneously. Also, hog it or just hog.

Go in


1) Put money into a pot, thereby remaining eligible to win the pot. 2) To run out of chips while betting or calling. In table stakes games, a player may not go into his pocket for more money during a hand. If he runs out, a side pot is created in which he has no interest. However, he can still win the pot for which he had the chips.

Go Light


In some home games, not played for table stakes, when a player does not have enough chips to continue betting in a pot, that player withdraws chips from the pot equal to the amount of the betting beyond his chips, (usually) stacking them neatly in front of him. These are called lights. To so withdraw chips is called go light.

Go South


1) Remove chips surreptitiously from the table (so called because on a map that's the direction they go), or pocket winnings while playing. Also called rat hole. 2) Palm or otherwise surreptitiously remove cards from the deck for later introduction (by a thief) at an opportune moment. 3) Leave a game or card room with money obtained dishonestly. 4) Disappear. "I lent him $20 and he went south with it."

Go the Overs


1) Over blinding (Put in a blind when one is already present. In a traveling blind game, this could mean someone putting in an optional blind in addition to the mandatory blinds. In a game without mandatory blinds, this would be blinding a pot (putting in a blind) after someone else has killed it. (To put in an over blind is sometimes called to kill.). 2) Playing at a higher limit than the house has set for the game, usually for the purpose of paying time to the house at the nominal rate for the game.

Go to the Center


To run out of chips while betting or calling. In table stakes games, a player may not go into his pocket for more money during a hand. If he runs out, a side pot is created in which he has no interest. However, he can still win the pot for which he had the chips.

Go Uphill


Defy the odds. Trying to beat a hand you know to be better than yours. In stud or hold 'em games, this means call another bet, with an inferior hand, to see one more card, and probably be willing to see subsequent cards if the next one doesn't help, or if the next one gives one a draw to a possible winner. In draw games, this means call a bet with the intention of drawing multiple cards trying to make a Gardena miracle or freak draw.

God of Lowball


A mythical deity to whom lowball players supposedly pray for good hands, and who presumably protects those in his good graces; used humorously.

God of Poker


A mythical deity to whom poker players supposedly pray for good hands, and who presumably protects those in his (her?) good graces; used humorously.

Going Home Hand


A hand on which a player has wagered his last chips and will go home if he loses. Generally the player puts all his chips in the pot prior to the call from another player, or prior to the draw in draw poker or lowball, stands up, and says, "If I lose this one, I'm going home." A going home hand usually beats an Oh shit! hand.

Going the Overs


1) Over blinding (Put in a blind when one is already present. In a traveling blind game, this could mean someone putting in an optional blind in addition to the mandatory blinds. In a game without mandatory blinds, this would be blinding a pot (putting in a blind) after someone else has killed it. (To put in an over blind is sometimes called to kill.). 2) Playing at a higher limit than the house has set for the game, usually for the purpose of paying time to the house at the nominal rate for the game.

Golden Glow


A liquid for marking the backs of cards, a form of daub.

Golyoonies


The nuts (The best possible hand of a given class. The "nut flush" is the highest possible flush, but might still lose to, e.g., a full house. Usually used in Hold'em games.); usually preceded by the

Good


1) Not foul, that is, describing a legitimate, playable hand, one that has not run afoul of the house rules. 2) The situation in which a player has one of the various traveling blinds, dealer blind, middle blind, or big blind, someone has opened the pot, and the holder of the blind calls the opening bet, usually with a marginal hand, and with the intention of "protecting" his investment (operating under the fallacious theory that the chip or chips he has put into the pot prior to the deal in the form of the blind still belong to him).3) In lowball, smooth (The best possible low hand with a particular high card. 8432A is a smooth 8. "I've got a good eight" means the hand is probably an 8-5 or 8-4. 4) Describing a, or the, winning hand, often said by the loser of a pot with respect to the hand that has beaten him, before he has shown his own hand. Saying "That's good" essentially surrenders the pot.

Good Game


A game with players worse than you so that you can expect to win a lot of money.

Good Hand.


A verbal acknowledgment by a player on the showdown that another player has the best hand.

Goolsby


In hold 'em, Q-T as one's first two cards.

Gorillas


In hold 'em, two kings as one's first two cards. Comes from King Kong

Grand


$1,000.00

Grand Jury


Three fours. (A grand jury has 12 members.)

Graveyard


Graveyard shift (One of the three shifts in a 24-hour card room or casino, the shift between swing and day. Graveyard shift usually starts anywhere between midnight and 2 am and ends eight hours later.). "When do you work?" "I'm on graveyard."

Graveyard Shift


One of the three shifts in a 24-hour card room or casino, the shift between swing and day. Graveyard shift usually starts anywhere between midnight and 2 am and ends eight hours later.

Gravy


1) Unexpected profit on a hand.

Grec


By extension (or guilt by association!), any professional gambler.

Greek


1) A card cheat; thief; card sharp. 2) By extension (or guilt by association!), any professional gambler. Also, Grec.

Greek Bottom


1) A cheating maneuver, in which the second card from the bottom of the deck is dealt. 2) The card itself, that is, the second card from the bottom of the deck.

Greekery


A general term for cheating or thievery.

Green


Green is the most common color for $25 chips. If someone bets a stack of green, it means they're betting a bunch of $25 chips, probably 20 of them.

Green Chip


A $25 chip, also called a quarter.

Grift


1) To cheat, usually involving stealing small amounts of money. 2) A swindler or cheater, generally one who steals small amounts of money on an irregular basis. 3) A cheating scheme used by a cheat.

Grifter


A swindler or cheater, generally one who steals small amounts of money on an irregular basis. Also called grift.

Grind


Win gradually, but consistently. The implication here is that this is done by someone in a game smaller than he is used to and by playing tighter than he usually does. Also said disparagingly of a conservative, winning player who never wins big, but also never gets caught gambling. "Been playing big lately?" "Nah, just grinding."

Grind Out


Win gradually, but consistently. The implication here is that this is done by someone in a game smaller than he is used to and by playing tighter than he usually does. Also said disparagingly of a conservative, winning player who never wins big, but also never gets caught gambling.

Grinder


One who grinds (Win gradually, but consistently. The implication here is that this is done by someone in a game smaller than he is used to and by playing tighter than he usually does. Also said disparagingly of a conservative, winning player who never wins big, but also never gets caught gambling.)

Group N Hand


In hold 'em, a ranking of starting hands, according to a chart originally developed by David Sklansky. Group 1 hands include aces, kings, queens, ace-king suited, and so on.

Gut


Pertaining to an inside straight. To catch in the gut means to make an inside straight. An inside straight card is sometimes called a belly card.

Gut Shot


A draw to an inside straight, as in 2-3-4-6.

Gut Straight


Inside straight (Four cards requiring one in the middle to fill a straight.)

Guts


"Normal" five-card-draw high poker, bet-or-fold before the draw, open on anything, that is, no opening requirements, as opposed to, for example, jacks or better.

Guts to Open


"Normal" five-card-draw high poker, bet-or-fold before the draw, open on anything, that is, no opening requirements, as opposed to, for example, jacks or better.

Gutshot Straight


An straight filled "inside". If you have 9s-8s, the flop comes 7c-5h-2d, and the turn is the 6c, you've made your gutshot straight.

Gypsy


See gypsying in. This term is often used in the negative, no gypsy, meaning that the minimum open is always two bets.

Gypsy in


In the smaller double-limit games, usually up to 15-30, a pot can be opened for the minimum bet.

H


Hearts (the suit), in written text. Jh, for example, is the jack of hearts.

H.O.E.


A game or tournament format in which three forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are limit hold 'em, Omaha/8, and seven-card stud high-low.

H.O.R.S.E


A game or tournament format in which five forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are limit hold 'em, Omaha/8, razz, seven-card stud (high), and seven-card stud high-low (the e standing for 8-or-better).

H.O.R.S.E.L


A game or tournament format in which six forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are limit hold 'em, Omaha/8, razz, seven-card stud (high), seven-card stud high-low, and lowball.

H.O.S.E


A game or tournament format in which four forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are limit hold 'em, Omaha/8, seven-card stud (high), and seven-card stud high-low.

Half a Bet


A bet equal to half the limit. Such a bet has significance only when a player has no more chips left than those with which to raise or call, in which case some establishments recognize it as a legitimate bet that can be reraised (on the side).

Half a Dollar


A $50 bill.

Half a Yard


A $50 bill.

Half and Half


Go half and half with a player on his buy-in to a game; usually preceded by go; sometimes followed by up. When the player quits, he splits with the person with whom he went cow. Sometimes the house goes cow with a player to enable him to get into a larger game than he could otherwise afford, generally with the no altruistic purpose of filling what would otherwise be a shaky game. At some point when the player (the house hopes) gets far enough ahead of the game, the house may split him out, that is, remove half of his chips and put him on his own. "Will you go half and half with me, so I can get into the $20 game?"

Half Kill


A game in which the winner of two pots in a row (or the winner of the whole pot over a certain size in a high-low game) must kill the next pot.

Half Smart


Partially aware of the workings of thievery, but not among the inner circle.

Half-and-Half Game


A game in which two forms of poker are played, usually for half an hour each.

Half-and-Half Tournament


A tournament format in which two forms of poker are played, usually for half an hour each.

Half-Century


A $50 bill

Half-Pot Limit


A form of poker (particularly common in England) in which the current betting maximum is equal to half the money in the pot at the moment the bet is made. When calculating a raise, it can include the amount required to call the previous bet.

Hammer


Last position to bet in a particular hand; sometimes the person to put the last bet in; usually preceded by the. "You got the hammer" probably means "I'll check to you" (implying, "Since you made a large bet before the draw you will probably make one after so I will check and let you hang yourself").

Hand


1) A player's best five cards. 2) A hand is also everything that happens between shuffles - cards are dealt, betting is done, a winner is declared, and the pot is pushed.

Hand for Hand


The situation that arises near the end of a tournament in which, usually, two tables remain and a few players must bust out before the tables are combined for the final table, all of the players at which will finish in the money. Because some players might hope to guarantee a place in the money by playing slowly, hoping to outlast someone else who might go broke, the tournament director sometimes stipulates that whichever table finishes a hand first must wait for the other table before starting the next deal, and the tables play hand for hand.

Hand Mucker


A thief who palms cards, which he holds out for later introduction into the game. This usage comes from a pan (panguingue) dealer, who, in the course of dealing the game, constantly shuffles cards that have been played (taking these cards from the discard pile, or the muck) and reinserts cards of similar rank and suit into various separated places of the remainder of the deck.

Hard


Pertaining to chips in a change transaction.

Hard-Play


Show no mercy in one's play against another player, that is, do one's best to beat the opponent; opposed to soft-play.

Hard-Way


A pair of something, usually used in lowball. A hard-way 8 is a pair of 4s. One player says, "I've got an eight," and some other player is likely to say, "I've got a hard-way eight" (that is, he paired 4s).

Hart, Schaffner, and Marx


Three jacks.

Have a Sign on One's Back


Be known to be a cheat.

Head Up


1) Pertaining to two players playing a game by themselves. "They're playing head up for a big one." (Two players are playing freeze-out for $1000.) Also, two-handed. 2) Head-to-head. When a house dealer says "Head up," he means that there are exactly two players in the current pot.

Heads Up


1) Pertaining to two players playing a game by themselves. "They're playing head up for a big one." (Two players are playing freeze-out for $1000.) Also, two-handed. 2) Head-to-head. When a house dealer says "Head up," he means that there are exactly two players in the current pot.

Heads-Up


Play between only two players.

Head-to-Head


Pertaining to (only) two players in a pot.

Head-Up


Pertaining to playing head up. "They're in a head-up game."

Heart


1) Guts; courage; the ability to flow with the tides of fortune in a poker game. "He doesn't play well, but he's sure got a lot of heart." 2) Any card in the hearts suit.

Hearts


1) One of the four suits in a deck of cards, whose symbol is shaped like a valentine. Originally, hearts may have represented the upper class, love being an abstract concept appreciated only by the rich and educated. In both the traditional and four-color deck, hearts are red. 2) A heart flush, that is, five cards of the same suit, all hearts. "I've got a straight; whadda you got?" "Hearts."

Heat


Attention being drawn to thievery or thieves by (usually) the management or (sometimes) other players; often preceded by draw. "I've been drawing too much heat at the Pasatiempo lately; I better stay away."

Heavy


In lowball, pertaining to a bad card. "I caught heavy" means I missed my hand by a mile.

Hector


The jack of diamonds. Probably a classical reference

Heef a Dooler.


50 cents.

Heel Peek


Back peek (A cheating maneuver that enables the dealer to see the face of the top card on the deck, accomplished by squeezing the top of the deck between thumb and little finger in such a way as to bow the top card in the middle so that its value can be surreptitiously viewed. This move is made prior to dealing seconds.)

Heinz


1) A wild card game, seven-card stud (usually) with 5s and 7s wild; so-called because of the Heinz slogan, "57 varieties." 2) In hold 'em, 5-7 as one's first two cards.

Help


To improve one's hand - Someone who says they need help means they need their hand to improve in order to have a chance at the pot. Or that they've just pawned their pacemaker to fund a few more hours of poker.

Hen


Queen (the card). Old, rare usage.

Here to There


A straight, sometimes shortened to here to there; itself shortened from from here to there without a pair.

Hidden Hand


Concealed hand (A hand played in such a way that you would not suspect it of being very good, but that turns out to be so.

Hidden Pair


Concealed pair (In stud, a pair, both cards of which are among a player's first two down cards.).

Hidden Trips


Down cards containing three of a kind, or, less commonly, a concealed pair matching one of the up cards.

High


The high hand is simply the best hand. When playing a high-low split game, one is said to "win the high" when one has the best hand, while another player wins the low. In seven card stud, the player with the strongest up cards is said to be high, and is usually first to act on fourth and subsequent streets.

High Belly Strippers


A deck marked by shaving the long edges of some cards (making the ends narrower than the middles) so that a thief can tell by feel the values of certain cards, usually certain high or low cards, such as the aces.

High Breeze Hummer


A tight player. "So tight he hums in a high breeze."

High Card


1) In a stud game, the exposed card with the highest rank, usually the one who must initiate the first round of betting. 2) At the showdown, a hand that wins when two no-pair hands or two flushes are in contention by virtue of containing a card of higher rank than any in the other hand.

High Chicago


This games plays the same as Seven Card Stud with the exception that the highest spade in the hole gets half the pot. This adds some interesting variation to the game, because if you are dealt the ace of spades in your first two down cards then you have guarenteed half the pot. Even if you start betting and raising like a maniac, chances are people won't fold because they will hope to get the other half of the pot. You might want to hold on until fourth street before you start betting heavily so that it isn't totally obvious that you have the ace.

High Draw Poker


1) Any form of draw poker played for high. 2) California draw (High draw poker as most often played in limit games: pass-and-back-in before the draw, jacks or better to open, each player antes, and there are no blinds.).

High Hand


In high-low split, a hand that wins the high half, or is in contention for it.

High Limit


Big limit.

High Mambo


A combination between stud and a widow game, in which players use three cards in their hands plus one community card, played high-low. Each player is dealt one down card and one up card, followed by a round of betting, one more up card, one more round of betting, and then a community card, with a final round of betting. Players use any combination of three of their four cards for high hand and any three for low. hand rankings differ from "ordinary poker." The highest ranking low hand, A -2 -3, is called a Low Mambo, and the highest ranking high hand, Q - K - A suited, is called a High Mambo. The remaining high hands rank this way: straight flush, three of a kind, straight, flush, one pair, highest card rank. There is a qualifier for low: to win the low half, a hand must be 6-high or better. One worse than a Low Mambo is A-2-4, and so on. If there is no low, the entire pot goes to the high hand.

High Man


1) In a stud game, the player whose board currently has the highest card combination. 2) In high-low split, the holder of the hand that wins high.

High Roller


Someone who likes to play for large stakes, or in the biggest games.

High Society


High society chips (Chips of the largest denomination in a particular establishment. In a small game, in which dollar chips are used for most bets, and $5 chips are termed society chips, $20 or $100 chips would be considered high society chips; in a $20 game, with most bets made with $5 chips, high society chips would probably be $100 chips.). "Gimme a stack of high society."

High Society Chips


Chips of the largest denomination in a particular establishment. In a small game, in which dollar chips are used for most bets, and $5 chips are termed society chips, $20 or $100 chips would be considered high society chips; in a $20 game, with most bets made with $5 chips, high society chips would probably be $100 chips.

High Spade in the Hole


A poker game played only in private or home games, a form of seven-card stud in which the pot is split between the holder of the highest hand and the holder of the highest spade in the hole. Also known as Black Maria, Chicago.

High Stakes


High-stakes game (Any game played for larger amounts than the other games in a particular establishment, or one in which big bets are permitted and common. Also called a big bet game.).

Highball


High draw poker. This term is rarely used.

High-Low


A poker game in which the highest and lowest hands share the pot. Also called High-Low Split.

High-Low Poker


Forms of poker in which the pot is split between the best hand and best lowball hand - In high-low split games, half the pot goes to the best hand (the high), half to the worst (the low). The criteria for deciding the low vary - see low. Split games are also often played with a qualifier that the low hand must be "8 or better." This means that the low hand must have five unpaired cards 8 or lower. Omaha and Seven Card Stud are the most popular high-low split games.

High-Low Split


Forms of poker in which the pot is split between the best hand and best lowball hand - In high-low split games, half the pot goes to the best hand (the high), half to the worst (the low). The criteria for deciding the low vary - see low. Split games are also often played with a qualifier that the low hand must be "8 or better." This means that the low hand must have five unpaired cards 8 or lower. Omaha and Seven Card Stud are the most popular high-low split games.

High-Low Split Game


Forms of poker in which the pot is split between the best hand and best lowball hand - In high-low split games, half the pot goes to the best hand (the high), half to the worst (the low). The criteria for deciding the low vary - see low. Split games are also often played with a qualifier that the low hand must be "8 or better." This means that the low hand must have five unpaired cards 8 or lower. Omaha and Seven Card Stud are the most popular high-low split games.

High-Roll


Try to increase the stakes in a game, or try to run over the game by constantly betting more than the other players feel comfortable with. "We were happy playing $2-to-go until you came along jacking up every pot; quit trying to high-roll the game

High-Stakes


Pertaining to a game played for larger amounts than the other games in a particular establishment, or one in which big bets are permitted and common.

High-Stakes Game


Any game played for larger amounts than the other games in a particular establishment, or one in which big bets are permitted and common. Also called a big bet game.

Hill to Climb


Obstacle to overcome. "You're stuck $100? That's no hill to climb for a stepper."

Hi-Lo


Forms of poker in which the pot is split between the best hand and best lowball hand - In high-low split games, half the pot goes to the best hand (the high), half to the worst (the low). The criteria for deciding the low vary - see low. Split games are also often played with a qualifier that the low hand must be "8 or better." This means that the low hand must have five unpaired cards 8 or lower. Omaha and Seven Card Stud are the most popular high-low split games.

Hit


1) To make a hand or catch a card or cards that improves one's hand. 2) Arrive. "The ace of hearts hit on the river." 3) The needed card that makes a particular hand.

Hit and Run


A player who has only been at the table a short amount of time and leaves after winning a big pot.

Hit it!.


1) "Let's go." That might be, depending on the situation, "I'll call your large bet," "I'll draw cards," "I'll play in this pot." 2) "I raise."

Hit the Brief


A cheating maneuver in which the deck is cut at a prearranged spot, often managed by shuffling in a brief. Also, force the cut.

Hit the Cage


Cash out.

Hit the Deck


1) Draw one or more cards. "When he stood pat, I knew I had to hit the deck." In lowball, usually implies a one-card draw. 2) Make a hand. "Things have been running so bad for me the only time I can hit the deck is when I'm drawing dead

Hit the Kicker


1) In draw poker, draw two to a pair, or one to three of a kind, with a kicker, instead of drawing three to the pair alone or two to the trips, and catch another card of the same rank as the kicker. If you draw to a pair of kings with an ace and make two pair, aces and kings, you hit the kicker.2) In hold 'em, catch a card of the same rank as your unpaired card. 3) In seven card stud, catch a card of the same rank as one of your side cards, when you already have a pair.

Hit the Table


Stand pat (To decline an opportunity to draw cards.). So called because a player often hits the table with his hand when it is his turn to announce his draw if he has a pat hand. Also, knuckle, rap

Hit the with Deck


Be in a situation of making every hand or having good hands in crucial pots, particularly when large pots are involved.

Hit-and-Run Artist


One who plays briefly in each of several games, usually with the intention of having a short winning session in each. This kind of a player is usually disliked, because he takes money out of the game, leaving the remaining players trying to win from a reduced pool of chips. Also, chopper.

Hitchhiker


1) An unexpected participant in your pot; usually preceded by pick up a. "I was trying to win all Jim's chips, but I picked up a hitchhiker, and she drew out on both of us." 2) An expected participant, generally someone you're trying to trap. "Looks like I got a hitchhiker" could be heard from someone who raised a lot and probably will win the pot, including many chips from the fool (that is, the hitchhiker) who elected to trail along. 3) Someone who comes in cold to a pot, that is, someone who has not yet had the opportunity to call any bets and, when a pot has already been raised, calls the initial bet plus the raise.

Hockey Sticks


In hold 'em, two 7s as one's first two cards. (That's what they look like. Sort of.)

Hog


In a high-low split game, use chips or voice to indicate you're going for both high and low simultaneously.

Hog it


In a high-low split game, use chips or voice to indicate you're going for both high and low simultaneously.

Hogger


1) A hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot. 2) The player holding the hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot. 3) The player who declares both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare.

Hogier


The jack of spades. May have been a cousin of Charlemagne.

Hold Dead


1) In lowball, cause another player to stand pat on a hand that is a loser, and not draw a card to a hand that might otherwise win. "John acted like he was going to draw two cards, and that held Henry dead on his 9-5, but in actuality John had an 8-7." Also, hold someone dead . 2) In lowball, decline to draw cards based on another player's actions with respect to his hand. "Sarah drew two cards, which held me dead on my 10-nothing."

Hold 'em


Generic name for a class of poker games where the players receive a certain number (2 to 4) of hole cards and 5 community cards. Usually there are betting rounds after dealing the hole cards, then after dealing 3 up cards (Flop), after dealing a 4th up card (Turn) and finally after dealing a 5th up card (River).

Hold 'em 8


High-low split hold 'em, with an 8-or-better qualifier for low.

Hold 'em Player


Someone who plays hold 'em poker (usually exclusively, or in preference to other forms of poker).

Hold me Darling


An obsolete name for hold 'em.

Hold Out


Perform a cheating maneuver in which a player removes one or more cards from play for later introduction. A held-out card can be concealed in a sleeve, in a vest, in a shoe, under the table, etc.

Hold Over


Consistently have better cards (than another player). "I can't beat him; he always holds over me."

Hold Someone Dead


Play a lowball hand in such a way as to keep another player pat on a worse hand, with the effect of keeping the player from drawing to a better hand, thus preventing the other player from winning the pot.

Holding


Your cards. "What are you holding?" or "What is your holding?" means "What is your hand?"

Holdings


Your cards. "What are you holding?" or "What is your holding?" means "What is your hand?"

Holdout


1) A card or cards being held out. 2) Holdout machine.

Holdout Artist


A thief who holds out (Perform a cheating maneuver in which a player removes one or more cards from play for later introduction. A held-out card can be concealed in a sleeve, in a vest, in a shoe, under the table, etc.).

Holdout Device


A mechanical device enabling thieves to surreptitiously hold out. Holdout machines used to be more popular many years ago, but are not often seen now, probably because thieves are becoming more sophisticated, and also because being caught with one is dangerous. Also called a string.

Holdout Machine


A mechanical device enabling thieves to surreptitiously hold out. Holdout machines used to be more popular many years ago, but are not often seen now, probably because thieves are becoming more sophisticated, and also because being caught with one is dangerous. Also called a string.

Holdout Man


A thief who holds out (Perform a cheating maneuver in which a player removes one or more cards from play for later introduction. A held-out card can be concealed in a sleeve, in a vest, in a shoe, under the table, etc.).

Hole


1) In stud and hold 'em-type games, the position for the card or cards dealt face down. From this comes the term in the hole. 2) Hole card (A card concealed in a player's hand.). 3) Losing; usually preceded by in the.

Hole Card


1) A card concealed in a player's hand. 2) In stud and Hold'em, the face-down cards dealt to each player.

Hole Card Stud


A form of five-card stud with an extra betting round, immediately after the first card, the hole card, is dealt. Usually played only in home games. Also called pistol stud or pistol Pete.

Hollywood


1) Acting. "Quit the Hollywood; we know you've got the Holy City." 2) In a showoff manner. When a player has only a few chips left, and someone bets him $1000, knowing that he can't call even 1% of that bet, that's a Hollywood move.

Holy City


The nuts (The best possible hand of a given class. The "nut flush" is the highest possible flush, but might still lose to, e.g., a full house. Usually used in Hold'em games.); usually preceded by the. "Get in a pot with him and he'll show you the Holy City

Home


The deal, or where the deal is. "A round from home" means one round in which each dealer over blinds.

Home Chowaha


A hold 'em variant invented in a private game by RGPer Mike Chow, and popularized at BARGE, in which each player gets two down cards, the dealer flops nine cards, arranged in three rows of three, then turns two cards vertically at the ends of the "corridors" between the preceding rows, and rivers one card in the middle and to the right of the two, the whole arrangement forming a large arrow-like structure. Players form their best five-card hand using their two plus any three cards from the four possible five-card board combinations: top row of three plus top card of two plus river card, bottom row of three plus bottom card of two plus river card, middle row of three plus either one of the two turn cards plus river card.

Home Game


A private game played at someone's home, often one regularly scheduled, perhaps weekly. Players might refer to such a game as "the Friday-night game."

Home Run Hitter


A player who makes big plays that require maximum risk.

Honest


Not bluffing, with respect to calling a bet, and usually part of the phrase keep someone honest. "Well, I know you're not bluffing, but I've got trips, so I'll keep you honest." Related to pay off.

Honest Reader


A deck that has not been trimmed, or otherwise deliberately marked, but that, nonetheless, contains irregularities or factory defects, which permit observant players to identify some (or, rarely, all) of the cards from the back. Also called imperfect deck.

Honor Card


Any card 10 or higher. This usage comes from bridge (the game)

Hook


A Jack. So named because the "J" resembles a hook

Hooker


Queen (the card).

Hoop


1) A worthless ring. This has card room relevance, because you will often encounter a broker trying to sell you a hoop or a block. 2) Someplace to do something unspeakable to yourself, as an insult, and part of the expression, "Ah, stick it in yer hoop."

Hop


1) Remarkable draw; usually part of the phrase, two-card hop or three-card hop. "I thought I had a lock on the pot with a pat 7, but he made a three-card hop on me" means another pat hand just got beat by a three-card draw. Also called cathop. 2) Replace the cards in the same order as they were prior to the cut. This is a slSeven-of-hand maneuver by a card mechanic to negate the effect of the cut. Also called elevator the cut, jump the cut, make a pass, shift the cut.

Hop the Cut


Replace the cards in the same order as they were prior to the cut. This is a slSeven-of-hand maneuver by a card mechanic to negate the effect of the cut. Also called elevator the cut, jump the cut, make a pass, shift the cut.

Hop the Fence


Come in cold (Call a bet and one or more raises without yet having any money in the pot.); often followed by for. "He hopped the fence for three bets, drew two cards, and beat my pat 7," is often heard in a lowball game. Also jump the fence.

Horn


A drink. "How about a horn?" is a suggestion to join someone in a libation.

Horse


Someone playing for you, with your money, or with money owed you. "I'm losing, but I've got a horse in the 20 who's way ahead" means that I have a part (or all) of someone's action in the 20-limit game.

Horsing


Passing a small amount of money to another player after winning a pot.

Hot


1) Doing well; catching good cards. "Don't get in his way; he's hot tonight" means "Stay out of his pots; you can't beat him because he's making every hand he draws to." 2) Angry. "I'm hot enough to eat fried ice cream." 3) With reference to a deck, one that has recently produced a series of good hands.

Hot Babe


An attractive, well-dressed female in or near a casino. The term is a trademark of rec.gambling.

Hot Deck


A deck that has recently produced a series of good hands.

Hot One


To burn (To set aside a card which has been inadvertently revealed.). When the person dealing the cards (usually in a player-dealt game) takes the burn card off the deck prior to dealing the draw cards, he might say, "There's the hot one."

Hot Seat


A seat or position at the table that has recently had a run of good hands.

Hot Streak


Winning streak.

House


The establishment; the casino or card room - The card room (management, owners, etc.) is the house.

House Chips


Chips being played for the establishment, that, is those belonging to a dealer while he is working, to a shill, or perhaps a stake or proposition player, as opposed to live chips.

House Cut


Generic term for how the house profits from hosting the game.

House Dealer


A house employee who deals the cards, sells chips, settles arguments, makes minor rulings in case of irregularities, and generally runs the game.

House Player


1) A shill (A card room employee who plays with House money, and does not share in any of his (her) winnings or losses. Shills are used to facilitate starting games, and keeping them going.) 2) A stake player (A player given house chips to play for the purpose of starting a game that would otherwise be short, or to keep a game that is becoming short from breaking up. A stake player keeps half his profits (after returning to the house the amount given him when he was first put in), usually at the end of a shift, but absorbs none of the losses. When he receives his share of the profits, this is the split-out. ). 3) Sometimes a proposition player (An employee of the gaming establishment whose primary purpose is to keep enough players at a table to prevent breaking up the game for lack of players. Unlike shills "props" make a small hourly wage but play with their own money, winning or losing based on their skill.).

House Rule


Rules and interpretations (e.g., use of wild cards, or rules on having to show beaten hands) that are specific to an establishment or even tables within the establishment.

House Rules


The rules by which a house runs its games, usually including establishing of betting limits, number of raises, what causes a hand to become dead, how to handle violations of playing conventions, and so on.

Houseman


1) A card room employee, often working on the floor; floor man. 2) House dealer. Players often address the dealer as houseman. "What's it cost me, houseman?"

Hoyle


Edmond. (1672-1769). English barrister and codifier of rules of games, author, in 1742, of A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist, which set down the rules of the game. Subsequent editions of the book contained treatments of quadrille, piquet, and backgammon. Hoyle wrote other books about games, and earned a reputation as an expert on rules. Over the years, the phrase "according to Hoyle" came to be synonymous with "by the highest authority." Although Hoyle never wrote a word about poker--in fact, the game was probably not played in his time--his name has nonetheless come to be associated with the rules of poker. Since Hoyle's death, several rules books on card games in general have had his name in their titles.

Huey, Dewey, and Louie


Three deuces.

Human Card Rack


Someone who gets a lot of good hands; usually used facetiously or humorously.

Humps


A deck marked by shaving the long edges of some cards such that they are wider towards their middles, so that a thief can tell by feel the values of certain cards, usually certain high or low cards, such as the aces.

Hung


Awaiting someone's action. "Where's it hung?" is asked when it seems the player whose action is next is either dreaming and aware it's her turn or the player is taking her time making a decision.

Hurricane


Two-card poker.

Hustle


1) To make your living playing cards. 2) To take unfair advantage of others, particularly of newcomers.

Hustler


1) Someone who makes his living playing cards. 2) A player who takes unfair advantage of others, particularly of newcomers. 3) Thief; this usage is rare.

Hustling


1) To make your living playing cards. 2) To take unfair advantage of others, particularly of newcomers.

I Wait


I check.

Ice


A cold deck (A deck, presumably with preset hands in it (usually with several good hands, the best of which will go to the dealer or his confederate), surreptitiously substituted by a cheat for the deck he is supposed to be dealing.). So called because, after cards are dealt for awhile, they warm a bit to the touch, while a cold deck actually feels cool, or, by extension, like ice

Idiot End


An ignorant end (In hold 'em, the low end of a straight, or a straight that can lose to a higher straight.)

Ignorant End


In hold 'em, the low end of a straight, or a straight that can lose to a higher straight. This is a risky hand to hold or draw to, because someone can easily end up with a higher straight. If you have 5-6 in the hole, and the flop is 7-8-9, you have flopped the ignorant end of the straight, and will lose to anyone starting with 10-J or 6-10. Also called dumb end, idiot end.

Immortal


An unbeatable hand, based on circumstances.

Immortal Nuts


Immortal (An unbeatable hand, based on circumstances.).

Immortals


Immortal (An unbeatable hand, based on circumstances.).

Imperfect Deck


1) Honest reader (A deck that has not been trimmed, or otherwise deliberately marked, but that, nonetheless, contains irregularities or factory defects, which permit observant players to identify some (or, rarely, all) of the cards from the back. Also called imperfect deck.). 2) A deck with too few, too many, or duplicated cards.

Implicit Collusion


A situation can arise in which the leader in a pot would prefer that one or more of his opponents fold because, while he has a positive expectation on his bet, he is not a favorite against the field. In implicit collusion, all opponents come to an independent agreement--that is, without consulting among each other--to all play in such a way as to minimize the chance of the player with the best hand winning the pot.

Implied Odds


The amount of money you expect to win if you make your hand versus the amount of money it will cost you to continue playing - Pot odds that do not exist at the moment, but may be included in your calculations because of bets you expect to win if you hit your hand.

Improve


1) Better a hand, particularly catch one needed card.

Improvement


Betterment of a hand.

In


1) How many chips a player has bought altogether. "How much you in?" might be an attempt by another player to find out whether that large stack of chips you have is winnings or all your own money. Also, in for. 2) Taking part in a pot. "You in?" means "Are you partaking in this sporting venture?" 3) Having anted. In this context, "You in?" means "Did you ante?" (and implies that you didn't).

In a Row


Descriptive of or a name for a straight.

In Action


1) Describing a pot in contention. 2) Describing an active hand. (A hand still in contention for a pot.)3) Having money, said of a player who has sufficient wherewithal to play the games of his choice. To say that John is in action means that he is not broke and implies that being broke is not unusual for John. 4) Playing or able to play. "He's in action" means "He's in a game." "He's not in action" means "He's not in a game," and is usually extended to mean that he is not currently playing poker because he has insufficient capita

In for


1) The total action to which one player is entitled, usually when side pots are involved. "How much is he in for?" implies that one who is all in is entitled to only a certain portion of the pot. 2) All in, and thus entitled to only part of the pot. "I'm in for the antes" means I can win only the antes if I win; "I'm in for one bet" means I get an amount equal to one bet from each player if I win. 3) How much a player is in (How many chips a player has bought altogether. "How much you in for?" might be an attempt by another player to find out whether that large stack of chips you have is winnings or all your own money.).

In Front


Winning; sometimes followed by an amount. "You stuck?" "Nah, I'm in front." "I'm in front a dime."

In the Air


Traditionally, a poker tournament starts when the tournament director (or whoever's running things) instructs the dealers to get the cards "in the air." This just means to start dealing.

In the Blind


Bet or check blind (A mandatory bet made by certain player(s) usually sitting left of the Button before each new hand is dealt. Used in place of antes or in conjunction with antes.).

In the Bushes


In the weeds. (The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds.

In the Chips


1) Winning. 2) The state of having lots of money. Also termed in action. The phrase has passed into general usage

In the Dark


To check or bet blind, without looking at your cards.

In the Gut


Inside (Pertaining to an inside straight. To catch inside means to make an inside straight. An inside straight card is sometimes called a belly card.)

In the Hole


1) Pertaining to a player's hole card or cards. In five-card stud: "He had an ace in the hole." In seven-card stud: "He ended up with three high spades in the hole." 2) Stuck, that is, losing. "How much are you in the hole?"

In the Middle


1) Pertaining to a situation in which one player finds himself between two others who are raising frequently, or, in a no-limit game, heavily. He is not necessarily physically between these two; he is logically, however, as far as the betting goes. Also called whipsawed 2) Pertaining to a situation in which a player can receive his first hand, if he is too late to get the big blind, in the middle position. To do so is to take it in the middle, take the middle blind, or come in in the middle. (Some clubs do not let a new player, that is, new to the particular game, be dealt in until it is his turn to put in the blind, supposedly to prevent his getting any "free" hands.) Also, if a seated player has missed the blind in a particular round, he can receive his next hand only in the blind position. In such a case, a player must come in on the blind, come in in the middle, or, if not in the big blind position, over blind to receive a hand.

In the Money


Having lasted long enough in a tournament to guarantee finishing as one of the winners. Depending on the size of the tournament, this might be one of the top three, having made it to the final table, one of the final 16, perhaps even one of the final 26 (or more, in some very large or special tournaments).

In the Pocket


Pertaining to the hole card or cards. (A card concealed in a player's hand or in stud and Hold'em, the face-down cards dealt to each player.)

In the Weeds


The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds.

In the Woods


In the Weeds. (The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds.

In Turn


Playing when one is required (and allowed to), according to the rules of the game. That usually means waiting to act until the player before one has completed her action.

Index


1) A number or letter (2 through 10 or J, Q, K, A) in the upper left-hand and lower right-hand corner of a card denoting the card's rank. (Some say that the suit indication--the single spade, heart, club, or diamond--beneath the number or letter is part of the index.) 2) A mark placed on the back of a card by a cheat to indicate the value of the card.

Inside


Pertaining to an inside straight. To catch inside means to make an inside straight. An inside straight card is sometimes called a belly card.

Inside Straight


Four cards requiring one in the middle to fill a straight.

Inside Wrap


In Omaha, a situation in which your four downwards consist of three cards each separated by one rank, which combine with two cards of the flop to form five consecutive cards, so that many cards on the turn or river give you a straight.

Insurance


In big bet poker, it is possible to reach a situation in which you are uncomfortable with the amount of money you have invested in a pot. To reduce variance, players will sometimes take insurance against an unfortunate outcome, essentially selling the actual outcome of the hand for its mathematical equity (at a slight discount).

Insurance Bet


In big bet poker, it is possible to reach a situation in which you are uncomfortable with the amount of money you have invested in a pot. To reduce variance, players will sometimes take insurance against an unfortunate outcome, essentially selling the actual outcome of the hand for its mathematical equity (at a slight discount).

Insurance Man


A player or spectator who sells or books insurance.

International Signals


A set of signals supposedly universally recognized by all thieves, allowing thieves who don't even know each other to communicate their desire to fleece the suckers, indicate their need for particular cards, and so on. These signals are of no use in games with sophisticated players, who are clever enough to catch on to what is going on, and are unnecessary with "dummies," because they can be beat by good playing. Some thieves still are not clever enough to understand these concepts, however, and you may see them in some games, particularly those in which the management does not give its players much protection.

Investment


1) How much of a particular pot you put in. Everything beyond that is your profit (if you win the pot). 2) At any point, how much it has cost you up to that point to remain in the pot.

Investment Odds


The amount of money in the pot versus the amount of money it will cost you to continue in the hand.

Iron Duke


The nuts, that is, a hand that has a very good chance of winning a particular pot. Also called ironclad hand

Ironclad Hand


The nuts, that is, a hand that has a very good chance of winning a particular pot. Also called iron duke

Irregular Hand


A Dead hand / foul hand (A hand no longer legally playable, due to some irregularity.);

Irregularity


1) Any breach of the house rules, intentional or not, such as discarding out of turn, announcing one's intentions out of turn, misdealing, and so on. 2) Something that might cause an imperfect deck, such as flawed cards that might make the deck unintentionally marked.

Isolate


To raise with the intention of reaching a heads up between yourself and a single other player.

Itemer


Someone who helps a cardsharp by sending him signals, supplying him with a stacked deck, or otherwise helping him cheat.

Iteming


Using an itemer (Someone who helps a cardsharp by sending him signals, supplying him with a stacked deck, or otherwise helping him cheat.).

J


Abbreviation for a jack, usually found only in written text about cards.

Jack


1) A face card, the one that ranks between the 10 and the queen. 2) To raise. "I'll jack it" means "I'll raise." "I'll jack the pot." Often part of the phrase jack it, jack up, or jack it up.

Jack Benny


In hold 'em, a 3 and a 9 as the down cards, from Benny's running gag about his age.

Jack High


1) In high poker, a no pair hand whose highest card is a jack. "I have a jack high; can you beat that?" "Yeah, I got queen high." 2) In low poker, a hand topped by a jack.

Jack it


To raise.

Jack it Up


To raise.

Jack Jackson


Jack (the card).

Jack Stripper


A jack marked by shaving its long edge so that a thief can determine its rank by feel.

Jack Up


1) Raise the limits. "Let's jack up this game!" means let's play for higher stakes. 2) Raise. "Let's jack up this pot!" means "I raise."

Jackal


Jack (the card).

Jack-High


Pertaining to a straight or flush topped by a jack. "I was drawing to a jack-high flush but all I made was jack high."

Jackpot


A progressive prize in some card rooms given to the player who gets, in lowball, a 6-4 beat, or, in high, a given hand, perhaps aces full, or four of a kind, beat. The procedure for collection of the prize fund differs in each card room. In some, part of the antes or blinds, called the jackpot drop is taken each hand and added to the jackpot fund. The procedure for awarding the jackpot also varies widely. In some clubs, the fund is for all games; in others, it is for a specific game.

Jackpot Drop


A Jackpot (A special bonus paid to the loser of a hand if he gets a very good hand beaten.)

Jackpot Poker


A form of poker in which the card room offers a jackpot for particularly bad beats. Typically you must have aces full or better.

Jackpots


A form of high draw poker, in which a player cannot open the pot without holding at least two jacks as openers before the draw. This is the same as jacks or better; the term jackpots is mostly used in home games.

Jacks Back


A form of five-card draw poker in which each player in turn looks at his cards, and opens if he has jacks or better (and if he wishes). If no player opens for high--and to do so he must have at least a pair of jacks (and he must show openers at some point)--then the hand is played for low (as described under ace-to-five), again starting with the player to the left of the dealer. At this point, the game becomes bet-or-fold

Jacks Full


A Full house consisting of three jacks and another pair.

Jacks Open / Tripps Win


Played like 5-card draw, with the following differences. Jacks or better are needed to open the betting (if no one can open, re-ante and re-deal). Then there is the standard betting round, draw and betting round. Then, if anyone has three-of-a-kind or better, he says so, and the highest hand wins. If not, then everyone who is still in gets another opportunity to draw. If a player has at least three-of-a-kind, he must say so and cannot keep drawing. This game almost always requires reshuffling and it must be decided beforehand when to reshuffle (after the last card, when there are less than 3 cards left or when the player asks for more than the number of cards left).

Jacks or Better


A form of draw poker in which a player needs at least a pair of Jacks to start the betting.

Jacks Over


1) Jacks up (Two pair, the higher of which are jacks.). 2) Jacks full (A Full house consisting of three jacks and another pair.).

Jacks to Open


Same as jacks or better (A form of draw poker in which a player needs at least a pair of Jacks to start the betting.).

Jacks Up


Two pair, the higher of which are jacks.

Jackson


Jack (the card).

Jacksonville


Jack (the card).

Jacksonville, Florida


Jack (the card).

Jake


Jack (the card)

Jam


To bet or raise the maximum, especially in no-limit, is to jam.

Jam it


To bet or raise the maximum, especially in no-limit, is to jam.

Jam it Up


To bet or raise the maximum, especially in no-limit, is to jam.

Jam Pot


A pot with lots of betting, raising, and re-raising

Jam the Pot


To bet or raise the maximum, especially in no-limit, is to jam.

Jam Up


To bet or raise the maximum, especially in no-limit, is to jam.

Jammed Pot


The pot has been raised the maximum number of times, and may also be multi-way.

Jam-Up


1) A way of playing: very good, or very tight. "He's playing jam-up and jelly-tight." 2) Really good, usually describing a game.

Jaybird


Jack (the card).

Jayboy


Jack (the card).

J-Bird


Jack (the card).

J-Boy


Jack (the card).

Jerusalem


The nuts (The best possible hand of a given class. The "nut flush" is the highest possible flush, but might still lose to, e.g., a full house. Usually used in Hold'em games.). "Get in a pot with him and he'll show you Jerusalem." More commonly called the Holy City

Jesse


Jesse James (A pot stealer; a bluffer.). If you raise me out of a pot, I might say, "Take it, Jesse." This implies that you have bluffed me out with your bet.

Jesse James


1) A pot stealer; a bluffer. 2) In hold 'em, a 4 and a 5 as the down cards, because legend has it he was shot with a .45.

Jimmy Hix


In lowball, a 6-high hand.

Jitney


$5 or a $5 chip. Comes from the five cents that used to be the fare on a jitney bus.

Joe Bernstein


In hold' em, 6-9 as one's first two cards. Named after a famous gambler and high roller of the 20s and 30s.

Joe Goz


The shift manager; the boss. "Who's the Joe Goz around here?"

Jog


A brief (A tiny "ledge" shuffled into a deck by a cheater so that his accomplice can cut it at the prearranged location; a card offset by a barely perceptible fraction of an inch but able to be found by touch when cut. A brief can be felt but not easily seen; a good cutter can feel a 1/32-inch brief. Sometimes called jog, needle, or step.).

Jog Cut


A cut made to a brief by a cheater, such that a desired clump of cards ends up at a specified location of the deck, usually right at the top or at the bottom.

John


1) Jack (the card). 2) Easy prey for a thief; ignorant or naive player. From the slang term for a prostitute's customer.

Johnny


Jack (the card)

Johnny Moss


In hold ' em, A-T as one's first two cards.

Joint


Card room; gambling establishment. Also called store or shop. Sometimes part of the phrase bust-out joint, carpet joint, juice joint, sawdust join

Joker


The fifty-third card in the deck, used as a wild card.

Joker Poker


Any poker game in which a joker is used. Also called poker with the joker

Joker Problems


Joker trouble (In lowball, drawing more than one card because one has the joker; usually used as an excuse to justify what others might otherwise criticize as a bad play. "Gimme two. I've got joker trouble).

Joker Trouble


In lowball, drawing more than one card because one has the joker; usually used as an excuse to justify what others might otherwise criticize as a bad play. "Gimme two. I've got joker trouble

Joker Wild


Any poker game in which a joker is used as a wild card. Also called poker with the joker.

Jokers Wild


Joker wild (Any poker game in which a joker is used as a wild card. Also called poker with the joker.)

Joy Girl


Queen (the card).

Judge Bean


Three 10s, probably referring to 30 days, one of the many sentences the frontier judge was famous for handing ou

Judge Duffy


Three 10s, probably referring to "30 days or $30," a common sentence handed down for pleading guilty in the 1930s and 40s to illegal gambling, by this (probably) generic judge

Judith


The queen of hearts. May come from the Bible.

Juice


1) Markings on cards (put there by a thief). 2) A percentage of each pot kept by the house; also called rake or vigorish. 3) To mark a deck.

Juice Joint


A crooked card room or gambling establishment. Also called wire joint.

Jump


Liveliness; "I like his action. He's got a lot of jump."

Jump the Cut


Hop the cut (Replace the cards in the same order as they were prior to the cut. This is a slSeven-of-hand maneuver by a card mechanic to negate the effect of the cut. Also called elevator the cut, jump the cut, make a pass, shift the cut.).

Jump the Fence


Come in cold (Call a bet and one or more raises without yet having any money in the pot.). Also, hop the fence

K


Abbreviation for a king, usually found only in written text about cards.

Kankakee


A poker game played only in private or home games, a form of seven-card stud with a communal card, in which the joker (completely wild) is turned face up in the center of the table, where it becomes part of every active player's hand

Kansas City


1) Kansas City lowball, that is, Deuce-to-seven. 2) In ace-to-five lowball, the hand 7-5-4-3-2; so called, because that is the best hand in Kansas City lowball. 3) In ace-to-five lowball, when used attributively with a rank, generally means that card plus 5-4-3-2.

Kansas City Lowball


Deuce-to-seven (In a game played for low, deuce to seven usually means that the best low hand is simply the worst poker hand. If you haven't figured it out already, that hand is 75432, with no flush. Deuce to seven lowball is also called Kansas City, or Kansas City lowball.).

Katie


In hold 'em, K-T as one's first two cards.

Katy


In hold 'em, K-T as one's first two cards.

K-Boy


King (the card).

Keep Honest


To call an opponent on the river, even though you believe he has a better hand than you do.

Keep it or Shove it


A form of five-card stud, found only in home games, a high-low game in which, after each player has been dealt one down card, each player gets a choice, in order, on each succeeding card. When each player has one down card, there is a betting round. The dealer then offers a card off the deck to the first player. If the player wants that card, he keeps it. If he does not want it, he immediately gets the next card off the deck, and the first card is offered to the second player, who has the same options. He can take the card, or immediately get the next card off the deck, in which case that card is offered to the third player, and so on. This continues until everyone has one up card, at which point there is a second round of betting. Any card that goes all the way around the table without stopping at anyone, including the dealer, becomes dead. After the betting has been equalized, the operation starts all over, with a card being offered in turn to each player. After each time of each player having the same number of up cards another round of betting comes. After each player has four up cards, each player has the opportunity of replacing an up card with an up card, or the down card with another down card (the twist), followed again, of course, by another round of betting, and then a declaration, and then the determination of the two winners. This game is sometimes called take it or leave it, shove 'em along, or push. It is also sometimes called pass the trash, although that name is more often reserved for Anaconda.

Keep Someone Honest


Make sure someone is not bluffing, with respect to calling. "Well, I know you're not bluffing, but I've got trips, so I'll keep you honest." Related to pay off.

Kelter


In draw poker, a nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game. The hand is different in different parts of the country. One variant is any hand containing a 9, 5, and a 2, with one card between the 9 and the 5 and another between the 5 and the 2. This particular hand is also called a pelter or a skeet. Another variant is a hand with no card higher than a 9, no pair, and no four-flush or four-straight. Another is a sequence of cards, each separated by one rank, such as 2-4-6-8-10 or 5-7-9-J-K. This particular hand is also called an alternate straight, Dutch straight, or skip straight. The kilter generally ranks between three of a kind and an "ordinary" straight. Also Kilter.

Kem


A brand of plastic cards; usually followed by deck or cards

Key Card


The one card that will make your hand.

Key Hand


In a tournament, the hand that proves to be a turning point, for better or worse.

Kibitz


Watch someone play, or stand and watch a game, often from the rail.

Kibitzer


A non-playing spectator; a railbird.

Kick


1) To Raise. "I'll kick it" means "I raise." For this meaning, bump is sometimes used, but generally only in home games or by beginning poker players. 2) Hit a kicker on the draw (in draw poker). "My kicker kicked" means I drew two to a pair with a kicker and hit that kicker. If you draw to a pair of kings with an ace and make two pair, aces and kings, you kicked.

Kick it


To raise.

Kicker


1) In draw poker, a side card (one of a different rank) held, when drawing, with a pair or three of a kind, to disguise the hand or to try to improve the hand. Often the kicker is an ace.

Kicker Trouble


In hold 'em, when two players have the same pair, the one with the smaller side card is said to have kicker trouble.

Kill


1) To over blind (Put in a blind when one is already present.), or sometimes just blind. "I'll kill it" means the pot has probably already been blinded and I'm putting in another blind that is at least twice the size of the largest blind already in. Less often to kill means to blind a pot that does not yet have a blind. 2) Deliberately make a hand dead by a dealer prior to exposing the hand when requested by a player. This is so the hand can be shown without causing any possible arguments that the hand might be legally entitled to the pot because it is still live.

Kill Button


In a Kill Game (which see), the marker that identifies who won the last pot.

Kill Game


In a poker game with a kill, if a single player wins two pots in a row, the betting limits on all betting rounds of the next hand are doubled, and the player who won both pots is also required to post a new, larger blind bet (the size of the new small bet, which is twice the size of the normal blind before the kill took effect) regardless of their current position. Players who have the normal blinds for the hand still post the original blind amounts, even though the "big blind" is not yet in for a full bet.

Kill Pot


To stimulate action, some games require a player winning two pots in a row to kill the next pot. This is called a kill pot.

Killed Pot


The pot in a Kill Game (which see).

Kilter


In draw poker, a nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game. The hand is different in different parts of the country. One variant is any hand containing a 9, 5, and a 2, with one card between the 9 and the 5 and another between the 5 and the 2. This particular hand is also called a pelter or a skeet. Another variant is a hand with no card higher than a 9, no pair, and no four-flush or four-straight. Another is a sequence of cards, each separated by one rank, such as 2-4-6-8-10 or 5-7-9-J-K. This particular hand is also called an alternate straight, Dutch straight, or skip straight. The kilter generally ranks between three of a kind and an "ordinary" straight. The term is sometimes rendered kelter.

King


A face card, the one that ranks between the queen and the ace.

King Crab


In hold 'em, K-3 as one's first two cards. So called because a 3 looks a bit like a crab. Also called Alaska hand.

King High


1) In high poker, a no pair hand whose highest card is an king. "I have king high; can you beat that?" Also, "I have a king high; can you beat that?" "Yeah, I got ace high." 2) In low poker, a hand topped by a king.

King Kong


King (the card).

King without a Mustache


King of hearts. Use of this term is usually reserved for naming of wild cards by the dealer in a dealer's choice home game.

King-High


A term that often modifies (refers to) a straight or flush topped by an king. "I was drawing to an king-high flush, but all I made was a king high."

Kings Full


A full house consisting of three kings and another pair.

Kings Over


1) Kings up (Two pair, the higher of which are kings.). 2) Kings full (A full house consisting of three kings and another pair.).

Kings Up


Two pair, the higher of which are kings.

Kitchen Game


A home game, usually one for small stakes.

Kitchen Poker


A home game, usually one for small stakes.

Kitty


1) In a private or home game, a cash reserve or collection built up by taking a specified amount out of each pot. The kitty belongs to all the players, and is usually collected for some special purpose, such as paying the host of the week's game for the use of his home, for refreshments, sending one of the players to a tournament in Nevada, and so on. 2) The pot; often as part of the phrase feed the kitty, which merely means call a bet. 3) In various forms of poker played only in private or home games, a small packet of cards set aside at the start of a hand that may be purchased by or otherwise made available to one of the players, according to the rules of the specific game.

Knave


Jack (the card).

Knock


1) In draw poker, at the time to draw cards, indicate that one is pat (Holding or being dealt a pat hand. ). So called because a player, if he has a pat hand, often knocks on the table with his knuckles when it is his turn to announce his draw. Also, knock, knuckle, rap. 2) In any form of poker, at the time for making a bet, indicate that one declines to bet; check. 3) In knock poker, request a showdown. Also, knock. 4) When one is offered the deck by the dealer, after shuffling, to cut, rap on the deck to indicate one is declining the option of cutting the cards.

Knock Heads


Play head up (Pertaining to two players playing a game by themselves. "They're playing head up for a big one." (Two players are playing freeze-out for $1000.) Also, two-handed.). May imply two players who regularly seem to end up fighting it out for the same pots. "How come you and Jane are always knocking heads?"

Knock Poker


A combination of rummy and poker, usually played at home games by two to four players while waiting for a "real" poker session to start. As in draw poker, each player receives five cards face down. As in gin rummy, the remainder of the deck is placed in the center of the table, and the top card is turned over, starting a discard pile. The player to the left of the dealer has three choices: knock, draw a card from the deck, or the top card from the discard pile. If he doesn't knock--and he can only do so if he doesn't draw a card--after drawing, he discards a card face up on the discard pile. Each player in rotation has the same three choices. If a player feels that he has the best poker hand at any point when it is his turn, he can knock. If his hand is indeed best, he collects one chip (or some other agreed-upon amount) from each player; if it is not, he loses two chips (or, again, some other agreed-upon amount) to the player whose hand beats his. Obviously (or not so obviously), the further the game progresses without someone knocking, the better the hand needed to knock. This could mean taking a chance right at the start with one large pair. Several variations exist to this game; the preceding description is the most common.

Knuckle


Stand pat (To decline an opportunity to draw cards.). "He gave it the knuckle" means he drew no cards. So called because a player, if he has a pat hand, often raps on the table with his knuckles when it is his turn to announce his draw. Also, knock, rap.

Knuckle it


To stand pat (To decline an opportunity to draw cards.).

Kojac


In hold 'em, K-J as one's first two cards. Named because it sounds like the television series

Kokomo


In hold 'em, K-8 as one's first two cards.

Komoke


A variant spelling of comoque (In lowball, to pair. This comes from pan, in which you can draw a card of the same rank as one in your hand and not be able to use the drawn card. Sometimes spelled komoke.).

Komoker


Comoquer (In lowball, a card that pairs one in your hand. "I drew to a bicycle and caught a comoquer." ).

Kowboy


King (the card).

La Hire


The jack of hearts. May have come from a knight of the court of King Charles VII of France.

Lady


A Queen.

Lalapalooza


Lollapalooza (A freak hand, often five specific, but random, cards, allowed to win once a night; generally the punch line in an elaborate shaggy dog poker story.).

Lalapalooze


Lollapalooza (A freak hand, often five specific, but random, cards, allowed to win once a night; generally the punch line in an elaborate shaggy dog poker story.)

Lallapalooza


Lollapalooza (A freak hand, often five specific, but random, cards, allowed to win once a night; generally the punch line in an elaborate shaggy dog poker story.)

Lamb


A sucker or mark; a poor player easily relieved of his money.

Lamebrain Pete


A form of widow game, a variant of Cincinnati, found only in home games, in which each player is dealt five downcards, as in draw, followed by a betting round, and then five cards are turned face up one at a time, with each followed by another betting round, the difference from Cincinnati being that the lowest card in the widow and any others of the same rank are wild. Each player makes the best hand possible by using any combination from his five and the five in the middle

Lamebrains


Cincinnati, that is, the game described under Lamebrain Pete, but with no wild cards, and often played high-low.

Lammer


1) A special chip given to the winner of a tournament for which the award is an entry or buy-in to a larger tournament. The chip can be used only to buy in to a tournament, but can be sold to another player for this purpose.

Lancelot


The jack of clubs. Comes from the famed knight of King Arthur's Round Table.

Large


Pertaining to $1000. "I lost six large" means "I lost $6000."

Large Bet


In a double-limit game, a bet at the larger bet size.

Las Vegas Riffle


An appearance of shuffling the cards by a cheat, done by partial or complete concealment of the deck, but without actually changing their order (from a presumably set-up arrangement), by pulling one half of the pack through the other half, and then replacing the deck to its original position. Ironically, a concealed shuffle is not permitted anywhere in Nevada. Also called false shuffle or fast shuffle

Las Vegas Shuffle


Las Vegas riffle (An appearance of shuffling the cards by a cheat, done by partial or complete concealment of the deck, but without actually changing their order (from a presumably set-up arrangement), by pulling one half of the pack through the other half, and then replacing the deck to its original position. Ironically, a concealed shuffle is not permitted anywhere in Nevada. Also called false shuffle or fast shuffle).

Last Bet


1) A betting scheme, used only in home games, in which the betting on one round begins with the player who initiated the betting on the previous round (if there was no raise), or with the player who put in the last raise that was called around. In stud games, the actual boards of the players have no relevance. If there was no betting on the previous round, then it goes back to the last bet of the round before.

Last Position


1) Last to act in a particular round. 2) The card farthest from the door (front position) when the cards are held squeezed together. "How come the free peek is always in last position?"

Last Raise


1) In a hand featuring bets with multiple raises, the last raise on a particular round. "The live one put in the last bet every round and caught runner-runner spades." This means that the player in question raised every round, perhaps putting in the third or fourth bet. 2) Put in the maximum number of raises in a round of betting; usually followed by the bet, the bets, or the betting. Make the maximum raise permitted in the current round. "I'll cap it" means that someone has put in the, say, third raise.

Last to Act


The player who acts last in a particular round. In a button game, this might be the dealer or, on the first round, the holder of the big blind. In a seven-card stud game, this is the player to the right of the high hand.

Last-Card Louie


A player who stays in a pot in a stud or hold 'em game, usually with inferior cards, to the bitter end, hoping to win by catching the winning card on the end.

Late Blind


In addition to "regular" blinds, some games allow a player (particularly a new one) to post a blind bet in return for the right to enter the game immediately and act last on the first betting round. The amount of the blind is determined by house rules, usually somewhere between the last blind and double the last blind.

Late Position


A position on a round of betting in which you act after most of the other players have acted.

Lay Down


To reveal one's hand in a showdown.

Lay Down your Hand


To fold.

Lay Odds


To give favorable odds to an opponent.

Lay Paint


To put markings on cards with paint, ink, or some other fluid.

Lay the Odds


To wager more money on a proposition or situation than you can win. This does not necessarily mean you have the worst of it; it just means you're putting up more than the other wagerer.

Lazy Pineapple


Tahoe pineapple (A variant of pineapple in which players do not discard any of their three down cards. At the showdown, players can use none, one, or two of their down cards (but not three) to form their best five-card hand in combination with the five community cards. When played high-low split, a different set of cards can be used for each direction, but no more than two for either direction.).

Lead


To bet first, even when one had the option to check.

Leader


1) The player to bet first, as described under lead. 2) In a tournament, the player who, at any particular point, has the most chips.

Leak


1) Flaw (in one's play). "I can't win; there must be a leak in my play." 2) The tendency of an otherwise winning player to lose his money at other forms of betting, such as the craps table or sports betting. 3) Flash part of a hand. To leak your hand is to unknowingly expose one or more cards.

Leak a Hand


To leak your hand is to unknowingly expose one or more cards.

Leak Air


Put air into (Hold your cards in such a way that others can see them. Also, leak air.).

Leather Ass


Patience, that is, what you need while you wait for the good cards to come.

Leave it


Same as winner blind (A blind game in which the winner of the last pot leaves chips representing a blind in the current pot; these chips are the same as any blind, that is, they are counted as part of the bet of the player who has that blind. In draw games, the winner of the previous pot bets last in the pre-draw betting round.); often preceded by winner, as winner leave it. That is, the winner of a pot blinds the next pot. "We're playing leave it" might be said to a player just sitting down at a table, to inform that player that the rest of them are playing higher than the nominal size of the game

Ledge


Brief (A tiny "ledge" shuffled into a deck by a cheater so that his accomplice can cut it at the prearranged location; a card offset by a barely perceptible fraction of an inch but able to be found by touch when cut.). To cut on (or to) the ledge is to hit the brief.

Leg Up


In a kill game, describing the situation in which a player has won the previous pot, and is thus liable to have to kill the following pot if he wins the current pot.

Legal Bet


With respect to an initial bet in a limit game, an amount that constitutes a full bet, having various interpretations, depending on the club. See discussion under legal raise.

Legal Raise


An amount that constitutes a raise of a full bet, having various interpretations, depending on the club. In a limit game, in some card-rooms, a legal raise must equal the limit (for example, a $10 bet must be raised $10; $9 does not constitute a legal raise); in others, half a bet constitutes a legal raise. The rules are even muddier in no-limit games.

Legitimate Hand


A strong hand that is not a bluff.

Lemon Juice


Anything picked up in a pot without trying, usually the blinds, often as the result of a walk, or, sometimes, more specifically, by none of the blinds calling when someone opens.

Let it Ride


A casino game, banked by the house, that resembles poker only in the ranking of the hands. The game is sort of a cross between poker and a slot machine. Players make three bets before receiving their cards, after which each player is dealt three cards, and the house dealer places two cards face down to be used as community cards. After looking at their three cards, players can opt to take back one bet, or let it ride. The dealer turns up one of the community cards, and players can take back the second bet or again let it ride. At this point, the dealer turns up the remaining community card, and pays all winning hands according to a fixed payout schedule, starting with a pair of 10s. Players play against the payout schedule rather than against the dealer or any other player. The game is played on a seven-seat table, similar to a blackjack table.

Lid


The top card of the deck.

Lie


A bluff (To make a bet or raise with a poor hand, in hope that the remaining active player(s) will fold. ).

Light


1) Short of the complete bet. "He's light by $20." Also called shy. 2) Not having anted. "Who's light?" means "Who forgot to ante?" 3) Sit down. "Light and fight."

Light Work


Markings put on a deck with very fine lines.

Lights


In a home game, a situation that comes up when a player is light (Short of the complete bet. "He's light by $20." Also called shy.). In some home games, not played for table stakes, when a player does not have enough chips to continue betting in a pot, that player withdraws chips from the pot equal to the amount of the betting beyond his chips, (usually) stacking them neatly in front of him. These are called lights. (To so withdraw chips is called go light.) At the end of the hand, if the player does not win the pot, he buys enough chips to cover his lights. He then matches his lights, that is, puts the lights into the pot plus an equivalent amount of chips from the ones he has just bought.

Limit


1) The size of the betting increments in a limit game. This will seem obvious to most, but the limit in a $2-limit game is $2. Also called betting limit. 2) Limit poker. "I prefer limit to no-limit." 3) "The limit" is an expression used by draw poker players at the time of the draw referring to how many cards the players wish. In high, the expression "Give me the limit" means "Give me three cards"; in lowball, "Give me one card." So called, because "the book" supposedly says that good draw poker players take no more than three cards and good lowball players take no more than one.

Limit Game


Limit poker, or, more specifically, an instance of a game played with limit stakes.

Limit Poker


A poker game wherein the amount to be bet is fixed, or at most variable within a prescribed minimum and maximum.

Limit Stakes


Limit poker (A poker game wherein the amount to be bet is fixed, or at most variable within a prescribed minimum and maximum.).

Limp


To flat call an opening forced bet is to limp into a hand.

Limp Along


To enter the round by calling a bet rather than raising.

Limp in


To enter the round by calling a bet rather than raising.

Limper


One who has opened for the limit in a structured limit game, as opposed to coming in for a raise, or just called such a bet. "There were three limpers when it got to me, so naturally I raised with my suited ace-king

Line


A circle (or an oval on some tables) inside of which is considered to be the domain of the pot, with respect to determining whether or not a player must be forced to complete a bet. The line is either real, in which case it is actually drawn on the table (usually in white or black paint or ink) or imaginary; even if imaginary, it exists, and its existence is sometimes strictly enforced in games. The line defines the perimeter of the pot

Line Work


Spots, lines, curlicues, put on a deck by a cheater so that the cards can be read from the back.

Liner


A face card. (Because you can see a line when the card is face down and the lower right corner is lifted)

Lineup


The players in a particular game. Also called crew.

List


The exposed cards in Hold'em and stud. Also Board Cards. 2. A list of players' names or initials, those who want seating in or changes to particular games. In many clubs, there really is a blackboard or other large writing surface at the front or side of the room with lists of names. Also Board.

Little Blind


1) In a three-blind traveling blind game, the blind put up by the dealer. 2) In an under-the-gun blind game with two blinds, the blind to the left of the dealer.

Little Bobtail


A nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, five cards containing a three-card straight flush. Often ranks between two pair and three of a kind

Little Casino


The 2 of spades, from the game of casino. The other card that got its name from the same game is big casino.

Little Cat


A nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, five cards 3 to 9 with no pair (in some circles, 3 to 8 with no pair), ranks above a big dog, and below a big tiger. Also called little tiger.

Little Dog


A nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, five cards 2 to 7 with no pair, ranks below a big dog and above a straight.

Little Minnie


Little wheel (Another name (rarely used) for a wheel in ace-to-five (Wheel: A-2-3-4-5. Usually discussed in the context of lowball where it is the best possible hand.).)

Little Oldsmobile


In hold 'em, 8-8 as one's first two cards.

Little Pete


In hold 'em, 2-3 as one's first two cards.

Little Slick


In Hold'em, hole cards of A-2, suited or not.

Little Squeeze


A form of five-card stud, found only in home games, a high-low game in which, after each player has been dealt one down card and four up cards, each player has the option of replacing one of those cards. (The act of replacing a card is sometimes called the twist, so this game's alternative name is also its description: five-card high-low stud with a twist.) An up card is replaced with an up card, and a down card with a down card, followed by one more round of betting. Also called little squeeze.

Little Tiger


Little cat (A nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, five cards 3 to 9 with no pair (in some circles, 3 to 8 with no pair), ranks above a big dog, and below a big tiger.)

Little Virginia


A form of six-card stud, found only in home games, low hole card wild

Little Wheel


Another name (rarely used) for a wheel in ace-to-five (A-2-3-4-5. Usually discussed in the context of lowball where it is the best possible hand.). Sometimes called little Minnie.

Live


1) Not playing house chips. "All the players in the game are live." 2) Full of action. "This is a pretty live game." 3) Full of gamble (with the implication of foolishly so). "He's playing too live." 4) Pertaining to a hand that has not yet been folded. 5) Pertaining to cards that are part of an active player's hand, or part of those being dealt to him as his draw. 6) Pertaining to cards that are available to be drawn, that is cards that have not yet been dealt, or at least not seen. In stud, this might be cards a player needs to make a hand that have not been exposed; in draw, this might be cards a player needs and he knows his opponent or opponents do not have in their hands. 7) Pertaining to a legitimate (as opposed to foul) hand.

Live Blind


1) In double-limit draw (usually lowball) games, or almost any hold 'em or Omaha game, a blind that can be raised even when the opening bet is not a raise.

Live Card


In stud games, a card that has not yet been seen in an opponent's hand and is presumed likely to be still in play.

Live Chips


Chips belonging to an active player, that is, not being played for the establishment (which includes those belonging to a dealer while he is working, to a shill, a stake, or even proposition player), as opposed to house chips.

Live Game


1) One with no house players, as opposed to a dead game. 2) A ring game, as opposed to a tournament game, because the game is played with chips having actual cash value, instead of tournament chips.

Live Hand


A hand that is still eligible to win the pot.

Live One


An inexperienced, bad or loose player who apparently has plenty of money to lose; a rich sucker.

Load


A decent session's winnings. "He's back for another load."

Loaded for Bear


Having a great hand, usually one that has been passed; often said of a sandbagger.

Loan Shark


One who lends money, particularly to gamblers, at rates of interest far in excess of those charged by any bank or even any credit card, with 30% per week and more not being uncommon. Such a person often enforces repayment with threats of physical punishment--and sometimes follows through on the threat, as warning to other malingerers, when payment is late. Also called shylock.

Loan-Sharking


Lending of money, particularly to gamblers, at excessive rates of interest.

Loball


A variant - and now, according to the official list published by Card Player, improper - spelling for lowball. Also, just as improperly, lo-ball and lo ball.

Lobby


Sit out several hands, usually away from the table, or leave the table frequently.

Lobbying Chips


Winnings. "He's got lobbying chips" means, simply, "He's winning." So called because generally winners lobby, not losers. The losers have to concentrate on playing to get even; the winners can afford to relax and sit out a few hands. Also called talking chips.

Lobster


A sucker or mark, particularly when that person is a victim of cheaters; a poor player easily relieved of his money.

Local


Someone who lives in Las Vegas (and "lives" in the poker games), as contrasted to a tourist.

Local Option Hands


Nonstandard hands sometimes given value in a private or home game, such as big cat, little cat, kilter, skip straight, and so on.

Lock


A hand that cannot lose; a cinch hand.

Lock it Up


Reserve, with respect to a seat at a table.

Lock Player


A locksmith (One who plays only the nuts).

Lock Up


Reserve or save (a seat). "Lock up a seat in the 6-12 for me."

Locked on


Unable to throw a hand away. "Too much money in the pot; you got me locked on." Also, tied on.

Locked Up


1) Pertaining to chips residing in the stack of a very tight player, and thus difficult for any other player to win. "You're not going to win any of those chips back; he's got them locked up." 2) Reserved, with respect to a seat at a table.

Locksmith


One who plays only the nuts (usually used in a derisive sense).

Lollapalooza


1) A freak hand, often five specific, but random, cards, allowed to win once a night; generally the punch line in an elaborate shaggy dog poker story. Sometimes lalapalooza, lalapalooze, lallapalooza, or looloo. 2) The nuts.

London Lowball


A form of lowball stud poker, played in England, in which the ace is low, but straights and flushes count against the player as in deuce-to-seven lowball, so the best hand is 6-4-3-2-ace.

Long Call


Calling with mediocre cards, usually in an attempt to catch someone bluffing. "He thought the guy was bluffing and so he made a long call with a pair of deuces."

Long Odds


The odds for an event that has a relatively small chance of occurring.

Long Studs


Stud poker involving more than five cards; a term used primarily in England

Longshot


1) A hand that has only a poor chance of winning; one that has to defy the odds to win. 2) A bet that has only a poor chance of winning.

Look


Call, especially the final bet or raise before the showdown; often followed by at. If someone bets at you and you say, "I'll look," that means, "I'll call you." "I'll look at you" means the same. In most card rooms, saying "I'll look" is not equivalent to saying "I call." The latter is usually binding, that is, if you say "I call" when it is your turn to act, you must put chips in the pot, even if the other player shows his cards before you have a chance to physically get them in. (It's usually a good idea, however, unless you know the other player very well, to wait until the chips are actually in the pot before showing your cards, even in establishments in which verbal declarations are binding. Saves arguments later.) "I'll look" is generally a phrase said accompanying the actual act of placing the calling chips in the pot, and is generally not binding (although it could be interpreted that way: another reason to be careful of what you say in turn). In this sense, see [the or your bet] is also frequently used.

Look at One


In lowball, a proposition sometimes offered when one player draws one card and the other two. The player drawing the two cards will look at one of his cards (only) and bet if the other player will raise blind, or sometimes even if the other player doesn't offer to do anything at all beyond look at his own cards.

Look at Two


1) In lowball, look at two cards (usually the first two dealt), with the implication of then killing (over blinding) the pot, "I'll look at two" often means "I'll look at my first two cards and if I like them I'll kill the pot." 2) Describing a lowball game in which players are allowed to over blind after seeing their first two cards. "We're playing look at two." "This game is look at two."

Look Someone Up


Call a bet, usually with a hand that can beat only a bluff.

Looking Down Someone's Throat


Being in a situation in which you know you have a hand your opponent cannot possibly beat. This implies that the other player has good cards showing on the board (in seven-card stud), at which you are presumably looking, and still you know you will win

Looking Out the Window


Describing a player who is not paying attention to the game or the action, often used in a situation in which you would very much appreciate if the player would take a great interest in the current hand. "Wouldn't ya know it? I get dealt a pat wheel and everybody's looking out the window

Looloo


Lollapalooza (A freak hand, often five specific, but random, cards, allowed to win once a night; generally the punch line in an elaborate shaggy dog poker story.)

Loose


Playing liberally; not tight. In high draw, usually implies drawing to all the little pairs, all the four-straights and four-flushes, and many of the two-card draws to other than trips, and often calling many bets and raises to do so. In lowball, implies taking all the one-card draws to rough hands (that is hands that frequently lose even when they are made perfectly), and most of the two-card draws. In hold 'em, playing almost any two-card starting combination, and playing through to the river on almost anything that has a prayer of winning. In seven-card stud, the same with almost any three-card starting combination, and staying in until the situation is hopeless. You often hear the rhyming phrase loose as a goose or loosey-goosey

Loose Game


A game with a lot of players in most pots.

Loose Juice


Booze, Alcohol.

Loose Player


One who plays loose (Playing liberally; not tight.).

Loosey


A loose player (Playing liberally; not tight.).

Loosey-Goosey


1) A loose player (Playing liberally; not tight.). 2) Playing in a loose fashion.

Loser


1) A losing player. 2) A player losing. (There is a distinction. Definition 2 may be just a temporary situation, while 1 implies permanency.) "I'm loser today." (The implication here is that, yes, today I'm losing, but that will change.) 3) A losing session. "I booked a loser my last three plays." 4) A hand that cannot (or probably cannot) win in a particular situation. "I can't call; I know this straight is a loser

Low


1) Describing lowball. "They're playing low." 2) In a high-low split game, holding the hand that wins the low half of the pot; descriptive of the low hand; sometimes preceded by go or going. 3) In a stud game, having the lowest card or combination of cards showing on the board; of importance because sometimes on the first round, the holder of the low card must initiate the betting. 4) Holding the worst hand at the showdown in a high game. 5) Holding the best hand at the showdown in a low game. In a number of games, the worst hand wins all or some of the pot. Draw lowball and razz are just two examples of games played for low. Omaha and seven card stud have popular high-low split variants, in which the low hand gets half the pot. There are two common ways to evaluate low hands. In deuce to seven games, the best low hand is just the worst high hand. The best possible low is 75432, provided there is no flush. In ace to five games, straights and flushes don't count, and aces are lower than 2's. So the best possible low is A2345, a wheel.

Low Belly Strippers


A deck marked by shaving the sides of some cards (making the middles narrower than the ends) so that a thief can tell by feel the values of certain cards, usually certain high or low cards, such as the aces.

Low Chicago


This game plays the same as Seven Card Stud with the exception that the lowest spade in the hole gets half the pot. This adds some interesting variation to the game, because if you are dealt the deuce of spades in your first two down cards then you have guaranteed half the pot. Even if you start betting and raising like a maniac, chances are people won't fold because they will hope to get the other half of the pot. You might want to hold on until fourth street before you start betting heavily so that it isn't totally obvious that you have the ace.

Low Hole Card Wild


A form of seven-card stud, found only in home games, in which the lowest card each player has in the hole (that is, face down) and all others of the same rank in that player's hand are wild

Low Mambo


Mambo stud (A combination between stud and a widow game, in which players use three cards in their hands plus one community card, played high-low. Each player is dealt one down card and one up card, followed by a round of betting, one more up card, one more round of betting, and then a community card, with a final round of betting. Players use any combination of three of their four cards for high hand and any three for low. hand rankings differ from "ordinary poker." The highest ranking low hand, A -2 -3, is called a Low Mambo, and the highest ranking high hand, Q - K - A suited, is called a High Mambo. The remaining high hands rank this way: straight flush, three of a kind, straight, flush, one pair, highest card rank. There is a qualifier for low: to win the low half, a hand must be 6-high or better. One worse than a Low Mambo is A-2-4, and so on. If there is no low, the entire pot goes to the high hand.).

Low Poker


1) Lowball (A form of five-card draw poker in which the lowest hand wins. The two most popular forms of the game are ace-to-five and deuce-to-seven.). 2) Razz (Seven-card stud lowball.).

Low Roller


One who plays for small stakes. Opposite to high roller.

Low Spade


1) A side bet in which two or more players (usually in a draw or lowball game) agree that whoever has the lowest card in the spade suit on the next hand (or, if no one has a spade that hand, on the following hand or hands) wins something, usually a prearranged bet, or a free drink bought by the loser or losers. 2) To play for the low spade. "I'll low spade you for the drinks" means that if, for example, I get the seven of spades on the next hand and you get no spades or a spade higher than the seven, you're supposed to buy me a drink, if you agree to the proposition. Sometimes called just spade.

Low Stakes


Low-stakes game.

Lowball (Or Draw Lowball)


1) A form of five-card draw poker in which the lowest hand wins. The two most popular forms of the game are ace-to-five and deuce-to-seven. 2) A wheel; usually preceded by a. "I've got a lowball."

Lowball Draw


Lowball (A form of five-card draw poker in which the lowest hand wins. The two most popular forms of the game are ace-to-five and deuce-to-seven.).

Lowball God


A mythical deity to whom lowball players supposedly pray for good hands, and who presumably protects those in his good graces; used humorously. Also, god of lowball

Lowball Stud


Razz (Seven-card stud lowball.).

Low-Stakes


Pertaining to a game played for smaller amounts than the other games in a particular establishment.

Low-Stakes Game


A game played for small stakes.

Luck


An factor that people think is partly or the only reason for winning, and that winners know is the main determinant for winning only in the short run.

Luck Out


Outdraw a good hand.

Lucky


Possessing luck. "I'd rather be lucky than good any day

Lucky Draw


Catching one or more cards that complete a hand against the odds.

Lucky Hit


Lucky draw (Catching one or more cards that complete a hand against the odds.).

Lumber


Kibitzer (A non-playing spectator; a railbird.).

Lumberman's Hand


In hold 'em, 2-4 as one's first two cards. Comes from two-by-four, a kind of board.

Luminous Readers


Readers (Marked cards, particularly those marked with special luminous ink that can be seen only by someone wearing special glasses or contact lenses sensitive to a particular portion of the spectrum).

Lying


Bluffing. "I think you're lying; I'm gonna call you."

Lying in the Bushes


The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds.

Lying in the Weeds


The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds.

Machine Man


A thief who uses a mechanical device for his cheating (for example, a holdout machine).

Made Hand


Complete hand.

Main Game


1) In a card room, the game with the highest stakes, or (sometimes) with the most action. Sometimes when a regular player first sits down to play, he may ask, "Is this the main game?" He means that he hopes the players are gambling or otherwise giving action. Sometimes the question is asked facetiously, when the player sits down in what is obviously a dead spread, that is, a game full of mostly house players or what seems to be a game with little action. 2) The game to which players must move from a forced-move game. 3) The more desirable of two (or more) games of the same form of poker at the same stakes.

Main Pot


When there is a side pot, that part of the pot all of the players have action in.

Major Hand


In high poker, (generally) a straight or better.

Major League Game


1) A high-stakes game. 2) The largest game in a card room.

Make


1) Catch the specific hand one is trying to end up with; often followed by a (or the) hand. In draw poker, if you start with 5-6-7-8-K of mixed suits, you discard the king, and on the draw receive either a 4 or 9, you have made a straight. You have also made the hand or made a hand. The phrases "I made" and "Did you make?" are elliptical, that is, "I made my hand" and "Did you make the hand (or your hand)?", respectively, are understood. In lowball, to catch on the draw any card below one's top card that does not give one a pair is to make the hand. Similarly, though used less often, in a stud or hold 'em game, to turn a drawing hand into a complete hand is to make the hand. 2) Detect cheating. "Did the floor man make you?" means "Did the floor man notice that you were cheating?" 3) Shuffle the cards prior to the next deal; same as make the pack.

Make a Move


To try a bluff.

Make a Move on the Pot


Same as make a play (Bet strongly), often implying betting or raising strong when the other players seem weak, and often when the player making the move is himself none too strong. Also, move on the pot.

Make a Pass


Replace the cards in the same order as they were prior to the cut. This is a slSeven-of-hand maneuver by a card mechanic to negate the effect of the cut. Also called elevator the cut, jump the cut, shift the cut.

Make a Play


1) Bluff. 2) Bet strongly. He made a play for the pot implies that he bet big to try to win it. Also make a move on the pot.

Make a Score


Win big.

Make Good


1) Pay money owed to the pot, usually by matching one's lights, which are (usually only in a home game) chips removed from the pot by a player who has run out of chips but has agreed to stand good on any bets, chips equal in amount to the betting from the point at which the player ran out of chips. If the player loses the pot, he must make good on the money owed.

Make Perfect


In draw poker, to catch one or more cards that give the maximum improvement to the cards kept. This phrase is most common in lowball.

Make the Blind Good


The situation in which a player has one of the various traveling blinds, dealer blind, middle blind, or big blind, someone has opened the pot, and the holder of the blind calls the opening bet, usually with a marginal hand, and with the intention of "protecting" his investment (operating under the fallacious theory that the chip or chips he has put into the pot prior to the deal in the form of the blind still belong to him).

Make the Deck


After the play of a hand, gather the cards and shuffle them for the deal of the next hand.

Make the Pack


After the play of a hand, gather the cards and shuffle them for the deal of the next hand.

Make Up


After the play of a hand, gather the cards and shuffle them for the deal of the next hand.

Make Up the Blind


Take the middle blind, and post, or otherwise arrange to receive a hand after having missed the blind.

Make Up the Blinds


Take the middle blind, and post, or otherwise arrange to receive a hand after having missed the blind.

Make Up the Pack


After the play of a hand, gather the cards and shuffle them for the deal of the next hand.

Making the Pass


Replace the cards in the same order as they were prior to the cut. This is a slSeven-of-hand maneuver by a card mechanic to negate the effect of the cut. Also called elevator the cut, jump the cut, make a pass, shift the cut.

Mambo Stud


A combination between stud and a widow game, in which players use three cards in their hands plus one community card, played high-low. Each player is dealt one down card and one up card, followed by a round of betting, one more up card, one more round of betting, and then a community card, with a final round of betting. Players use any combination of three of their four cards for high hand and any three for low. hand rankings differ from "ordinary poker." The highest ranking low hand, A -2 -3, is called a Low Mambo, and the highest ranking high hand, Q - K - A suited, is called a High Mambo. The remaining high hands rank this way: straight flush, three of a kind, straight, flush, one pair, highest card rank. There is a qualifier for low: to win the low half, a hand must be 6-high or better. One worse than a Low Mambo is A-2-4, and so on. If there is no low, the entire pot goes to the high hand.

Man with the Axe


King of diamonds.

Man with the Star


Joker.

Manage


1) Practice money management. 2) Run a card room. 3) Own a card room.

Management


1) The owners of a card room. 2) Those running or managing a card room.

Manager


1) Someone good at money management. 2) One who runs a card room. 3) One who owns a card room.

Managing


Successfully applying the principles of money management.

Maniac


A very aggressive player who plays hands that more conservative players would probably not consider.

Mark


1) Put scratches, bends, paint, etc., on cards such that they can be identified visually from the back, or by feel from front or back. 2) Scratches, bends, paint, etc., on cards; often plural. 3) A thief's victim.

Marked Cards


Cards that have been altered so that their value can be read from the back.

Marked Deck


A deck with marked cards. Also called cheaters.

Marker


A promissory note, credit slip, or IOU, usually held by a casino or card room, representing money owed by a player, against which the player plays.

Markers


Scratches, bends, paint, etc., on cards; often plural.

Marriage


In hold 'em, suited K-Q as the down cards. Comes from the game of pinochle.

Master Card


The highest card in play in a particular suit.

Match Lights


In a home game, a situation that comes up when a player is light (Short of the complete bet. "He's light by $20." Also called shy.). In some home games, not played for table stakes, when a player does not have enough chips to continue betting in a pot, that player withdraws chips from the pot equal to the amount of the betting beyond his chips, (usually) stacking them neatly in front of him. These are called lights. (To so withdraw chips is called go light.) At the end of the hand, if the player does not win the pot, he buys enough chips to cover his lights. He then matches his lights, that is, puts the lights into the pot plus an equivalent amount of chips from the ones he has just bought.

Match One's Lights


In a home game, a situation that comes up when a player is light (Short of the complete bet. "He's light by $20." Also called shy.). In some home games, not played for table stakes, when a player does not have enough chips to continue betting in a pot, that player withdraws chips from the pot equal to the amount of the betting beyond his chips, (usually) stacking them neatly in front of him. These are called lights. (To so withdraw chips is called go light.) At the end of the hand, if the player does not win the pot, he buys enough chips to cover his lights. He then matches his lights, that is, puts the lights into the pot plus an equivalent amount of chips from the ones he has just bought.

Match the Pot


In home games, a penalty that arises in certain situations, usually in wild-card stud-type games, when a player receives a card of a certain rank. For example, in the seven-card stud variant called baseball, 3s and 9s are wild. A player dealt a 3 face up must either match the pot, that is, add to the pot as much as it already contains, or fold. In some games, the player is not even offered the opportunity of folding; he must match the pot. Sometimes called buy the pot

Matchbook Shiner


A cheating device, a small mirror attached to the inside of a matchbook cover or small matchbox that has been placed apparently innocently on the table, used to read the faces of the cards while they are being dealt face down.

Matching Card


A card of the same rank or suit as another card, either in the same hand, or potentially part of the same hand, as when one of the communal cards in a hold 'em-type game. Also, mate.

Mate


Matching card (A card of the same rank or suit as another card, either in the same hand, or potentially part of the same hand, as when one of the communal cards in a hold 'em-type game.).

Maverick


In hold' em, Q-J as one's first two cards.

Mechanic


One who unfairly manipulates the cards, such as a cheat who deals cards from the bottom instead of from the top of the deck (where they should come from), or from the middle, or deals the second card from the top, or who falsely shuffles the cards so as to arrange them in a manner he has predetermined, or who palms cards, or uses any other of scores of cheating methods involving card manipulation or sleight of hand.

Mechanic's Grip


A way of holding the cards popular with mechanics, because it's easiest to deal seconds, bottoms, or middles when holding the deck this way. A right-handed dealer holds the deck in his left hand, with the thumb along the left edge, the forefinger at the front, and the other three fingers curled around the right edge. (A left-handed dealer does the same, mutatis mutandis, with his right hand.) Since many no cheating players also hold the deck this way, the grip alone is not evidence enough to accuse a player of cheating.

Meet


To call.

Mexican Standoff


A tied pot; a hand in which two (or more) players have equivalent hands and split the pot.

Mexican Stud


A form of five-card stud in which each player first receives two cards face down, and then rolls (turns face up) one card, followed by a betting round. Thereafter, each active player receives another face-down card on each round, from which he chooses one to roll, again followed by a betting round. Sometimes called flip or peep-and-turn.

Michigan Bankroll


A wad of bills, usually folded over, with a bill of large denomination on the outside, to give the appearance of a large bankroll. Also called Oklahoma bankroll or Philadelphia bankroll.

Michigan Roll


A wad of bills, usually folded over, with a bill of large denomination on the outside, to give the appearance of a large bankroll. Also called Oklahoma bankroll or Philadelphia bankroll.

Middle


1) The main pot when there is a side pot. "That dollar shouldn't go on the side: it goes in the middle." 2) A card dealt from the middle of the deck. 3) A card needed to make an inside straight

Middle Blind


1) In a three-blind traveling blind game, the blind put up by the player to the dealer's left. 2) The player who is in the middle blind position.

Middle Dealer


A mechanic who can deal from the middle of the deck. This is extremely difficult compared to dealing bottoms or seconds.

Middle Man


1) The holder of the middle blind. 2) Sometimes (rarely) the player who is in the situation of being between two players who keep raising and reraising each other. The name for this action is whipsaw.

Middle Pair


In flop games, a middle pair is made by pairing with the middle card on the flop.

Middle Position


A position on a round of betting somewhere in the middle.

Middle Straight


Inside straight (Four cards requiring one in the middle to fill a straight.).

Middles


Cards dealt from the middle of the deck (by a middle dealer)

Middles Dealer


A mechanic who can deal from the middle of the deck. This is extremely difficult compared to dealing bottoms or seconds.

Midnight Shift


One of the three shifts in a 24-hour card room or casino, the shift between swing and day. Graveyard shift usually starts anywhere between midnight and 2 am and ends eight hours later.

Mighty Wurlitzer


1) In lowball, a pair of 8s (that is, 88; comes from the number of keys on the instrument). 2) In hold 'em, 8-8 as one's two starting cards.

Mike


Blind stud.

Miles


In high poker, part of a phrase describing three of a kind (or, rarely, four of a kind), using total point value. That is, 30 miles means three 10s, and nine miles means three 3s.

Miles of Bad Road


Three of a kind. Prefixed with a number, 3* , to indicate 3 s. Thus "24 miles of bad road" is 3 eights, etc. (This obviously doesn't work for face cards.)

Milk


1) Shuffle the deck by pulling out top and bottom cards simultaneously, and forming a pile with these cards as they are drawn, for the purpose of thoroughly mixing the cards prior to shuffling. 2) Perform a cheating maneuver in which the cards are mixed by an overhand shuffle, or something that looks like a casual sifting through of the discards, in such a way as set up two or more hands to be later dealt to predesignated positions. This is a cheating maneuver usually done by a mechanic prior to some other move, such as hopping the cut and then dealing bottoms. 3) In draw poker, shuffle through one's five cards repeatedly by holding them face down and sliding one card at a time from top to bottom. Also called milk the cards, fuzz. 4) Get the most benefit on a hand (often a hand of relatively low value) from the holder of another, inferior, hand; usually followed by that hand or the name of the player who was so cajoled into calling the maximum. "You certainly milked me that time." "He milked that hand for the most he could get, considering who he was up against." 5) Withdraw money from a game, generally by tight, conservative play; usually followed by a or the game

Milk the Cards


In draw poker, shuffle through one's five cards repeatedly by holding them face down and sliding one card at a time from top to bottom. Also called milk, fuzz.

Milk the Deck


Shuffle the deck by pulling out top and bottom cards simultaneously, and forming a pile with these cards as they are drawn, for the purpose of thoroughly mixing the cards prior to shuffling.

Milk Up


1) Shuffle the deck by pulling out top and bottom cards simultaneously, and forming a pile with these cards as they are drawn, for the purpose of thoroughly mixing the cards prior to shuffling. 2) Perform a cheating maneuver in which the cards are mixed by an overhand shuffle, or something that looks like a casual sifting through of the discards, in such a way as set up two or more hands to be later dealt to pre-designated positions. This is a cheating maneuver usually done by a mechanic prior to some other move, such as hopping the cut and then dealing bottoms.

Milk Up the Deck


1) Shuffle the deck by pulling out top and bottom cards simultaneously, and forming a pile with these cards as they are drawn, for the purpose of thoroughly mixing the cards prior to shuffling. 2) Perform a cheating maneuver in which the cards are mixed by an overhand shuffle, or something that looks like a casual sifting through of the discards, in such a way as set up two or more hands to be later dealt to pre-designated positions. This is a cheating maneuver usually done by a mechanic prior to some other move, such as hopping the cut and then dealing bottoms.

Milker


A tight or conservative player. Probably comes from the description of someone who has to milk every hand he plays, because he would not ordinarily get much action. To milk is to Get the most benefit on a hand (often a hand of relatively low value) from the holder of another, inferior, hand; usually followed by that hand or the name of the player who was so cajoled into calling the maximum. "You certainly milked me that time." "He milked that hand for the most he could get, considering who he was up against."

Minnie


Lowball, the best hand, a wheel or bicycle, A-2-3-4-5 of various suits (including all the same suit). In some games, this could also be the lowest possible hand.

Minnow


Someone who plays over his head, that is, enters with insufficient funds a game larger than he is accustomed to.

Minor Hand


In high poker, (generally) three aces or worse.

Minor League Game


1) A low-stakes game. 2) The smallest game in a card room.

Miscall


Verbally declare your hand as being other than it is, usually better.

Misdeal


A hand dealt incorrectly that must be re-dealt.

Miss


To be unable to make your drawing hand when the final cards are dealt.

Miss the Blind


Be absent from the table when the blind positions arrive at one's table position. In most clubs, if a player misses the blind, he must either wait for the blind or post.

Miss the Flop


In hold 'em, the situation in which the flop bears little relation to a player's down cards.

Mississippi Stud


A form of seven-card stud, often played pot limit, with fourth and fifth street cards dealt without a betting round between them, and seventh street dealt face up

Mistigri


The joker, when it can represent any card. The name comes from French, and is close to 100 years old. It originally meant the jack of spades, especially when accompanied by two cards of the same color in the old games of bouillotte and brelan, both similar to modern poker, and later was used for the blank card that came with a deck of cards, and then for the game played with that card. That blank card later evolved into the joker.

Mistigris


1) High poker (usually draw) with the joker wild. 2) The joker, when it can represent any card. The name comes from French, and is close to 100 years old. It originally meant the jack of spades, especially when accompanied by two cards of the same color in the old games of bouillotte and brelan, both similar to modern poker, and later was used for the blank card that came with a deck of cards, and then for the game played with that card. That blank card later evolved into the joker. Also spelled mistigri

Mites and Lice


A hand consisting of two pair, threes over twos.

Mits and Mice


Nits and lice (In high poker, two small pair, usually 3s and 2s.)

Mitt


A poker hand, that is, a fistful of cards.

Mitt Joint


A crooked gambling establishment that relies on marked cards.

Modified Limit


Spread limit (Betting limits in which there is a fixed minimum and maximum bet for each betting round. A typical spread limit structure is $2-$6, where a player may bet as little as $2 or as much as $6 on every betting round.)

Molly Hogan


The queen of spades.

Monarch


A king (the card).

Money Management


Playing in such a way as to minimize your losses and maximize your wins. Many players win a little and quit, no matter how good the game, but when they get stuck, they often lose far more than they win in any winning session in a desperate attempt to get even. This is poor money management. For some, money management means quitting when ahead, and not losing back all of their winnings. For others, it means not putting all their bankroll on the table for any one session. For still others, it means putting aside a portion of their winnings into other money-making investments. Some poker writers claim that money management is not a viable concept

Money Odds


The best of it in a particular situation, with respect to the size of a bet that must be called compared to either what is currently in the pot or what is likely to be. In lowball, you might hear, "I knew I hadda beat an eight. I'm already getting 3-to-2 in the pot, plus I get all his chips if I make the hand. I was getting money odds." The term usually does not apply to a situation in which a player is getting better than 1-to-1 on his investment, but is taking the worst of it when comparing the odds against his making a winning hand with how much he can win for his investment. (That is, if a player stands to win $100 for a $50 investment, or 2-to-1, but the odds against him are 3-to-1, he is not getting money odds

Money Player


Any gambler, particularly a high roller.

Money Plays.


An announcement, usually by a dealer, of acknowledgment that a player has ordered chips from a chip runner and can bet up to as much as the amount of cash he has on the table.

Mongrel


In hold 'em, K-9 as one's first two cards.

Monkey


A sucker, particularly one who is the victim of cheating.

Monkey Flush


Three cards of the same suit, not in sequence.

Monster


A hand that is almost certain to win.

Montana Banana


In hold 'em, 9-2 as one's first two cards. Some say that the 92 refers to the number of the proposition that legalized poker in Montana; others have conjectured that it is called that because bananas will grow in Montana before that hand makes money. We have not been able to confirm either contention

Monte


Three-card monte (Any card game played with three cards, particularly poker.).

Moon


1) Shoot the moon (1- Declare both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare. 2- Win both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare.). In both cases, this phrase is usually heard in home games, and not public card rooms.). 2) Win all of a high-low split pot by having both the best high and low hands.

Moon Hand


In a high-low split declare game, a hand that declares for and wins both ways.

Mop Squeezer


Queen.

Mortal Cinch


1) The nuts (The best possible hand of a given class.); usually preceded by a. 2) Lock (A hand that cannot lose; a cinch hand.).

Mortal Lock


The nuts (The best possible hand of a given class.); usually preceded by a.

Mortal Nuts


The nuts (The best possible hand of a given class.); usually preceded by the.

Mortals


The nuts (The best possible hand of a given class.); usually preceded by the. Also called immortals.

Motion


The act of betting. If someone says, "Motion's good," he probably means, "If that act of reaching for your chips that you are performing is to be interpreted as an actual intention on your part of betting, you can take the pot, because I shall not be calling." Some clubs have a rule motion is binding, which means that if you have chips in your hand and make a motion toward the pot with the hand that holds those chips (also known as a forward motion), you must complete the bet.

Motown


In hold 'em, J-5 as one's first two cards. From the Motown singing group the Jackson Five

Mouth Bet


Oral bet (A wager made by announcing the size of the bet but without actually putting any chips or money in the pot. In some (not all) establishments, oral declarations made in turn are binding; nonetheless, cautious players wait till the chips are actually in the pot before either calling the bet or showing their hands. Also called mouth bet, verbal bet.)

Move


1) Perform a cheating manipulation of the deck. To deal seconds or hop the cut are to move. 2) Any fancy play. 3) Betting all of one's chips, in the phrase "He's making his move."

Move All in


Bet (usually) or call (less often) all one's chips in one hand. "Sally bet $20 and Jim moved in" means Jim raised all his chips (or hers, if she had fewer than he). Also, go all in.

Move in


Bet or call all one's chips in one hand; sometimes followed by on. "Sally bet $20 and Jim moved in" (or "Jim moved in on her") means Jim raised all his chips (or hers, if she had fewer than he). Also, go in.

Move on the Pot


Same as make a play ( Bet strongly), often implying betting or raising strong when the other players seem weak, and often when the player making the move is himself none too strong.

Mover


A card thief, that is, someone who moves.

Moves


Fancy plays, often accompanied by theatrics; sometimes just the theatrics. "He's got a lot of moves."

Muck


1) To discard a hand; also the discard pile in which all cards are dead. 2) A collection of face-down cards near the dealer composed of discards, i.e., folded hands, burns and discards for drawing purposes.

Mucker


Hand mucker (A thief who palms cards, which he holds out for later introduction into the game. This usage comes from a pan (panguingue) dealer, who, in the course of dealing the game, constantly shuffles cards that have been played (taking these cards from the discard pile, or the muck) and reinserts cards of similar rank and suit into various separated places of the remainder of the deck.).

Multi-Way


Involving more than two players.

Multi-Way Pot


A pot with more than two players.

Murder


Variation on Chicago games. Murder plays the same as Seven Card Stud except with the following exceptions: If the queen of spades is ever dealt up then the game is reset and players re-ante and the game is played again. If a queen of spades is dealt down to a player then it is a wildcard, At the showdown the pot is split between the player with the highest poker hand and the player with the highest spade up OR down. You cannot use the queen in the hole as a wildcard to win the Chicago portion of the pot, excepting that it acts as a queen of spades.

Mustache


A term of opprobrium peculiar to card rooms. "Ya mustache" means "You no-good person, you"

Must-Move Game


Forced-move game.

Nail


1) Mark a card, often with a fingernail. Also called spike, spur. 2) Catch the specific card you need to win, particularly as the last card in hold 'em or seven-card stud. "I nailed an ace on the river." 3) Catch someone cheating.

Nail-Pricking


Marking cards with one's fingernails, particularly sharp thumbnails.

Name of the Game


In lowball, a wheel (that is, a lowball).

Narrow the Field


To bet or raise in order to scare off other players whose hands are currently worse than yours, but have the potential to improve.

Natural


1) A card that is not wild. 2) In a wild-card game, a hand that does not contain any wild cards.

Natural Card


Natural (A card that is not wild.).

Natural Jacks


Draw poker played with no antes or blinds.

Needle Artist


One who regularly applies the needle (Anger by means of verbal abuse, often by application of sarcasm.) to others.

Needler


Needle artist (One who regularly applies the needle (Anger by means of verbal abuse, often by application of sarcasm.) to others.).

Needles


A pair of aces.

Neener


9 (the card or the lowball hand)

Neighborhood Games


Setting up your own game.

Nevada Lettuce


A $1000 bill. Since such bills are no longer in circulation, the term is now rarely used.

Nevada Nickel


A $5 chip. (This term is rarely heard.)

Nick


Short for nickel, that is, a $5 chip.

Nickel


1) $5 or a $5 poker chip. Also called a red or a redbird. 2) A 5. In high poker, three nickels means three 5s. 3) In lowball, having a 5 as the second highest card. A nickel 8 is an 8-5. Also, five dollars, usually represented by a red casino check.

Nickel-Dime


Describing a small game.

Nickel-Dime-Quarter


1) A small-stakes home game, with those being the chip sizes and betting limits. Usually, five cents is the smallest bet permitted and 25 cents the largest. Sometimes the nickel refers to the ante, the dime the minimum bet, and the quarter the largest. Also, quarter game. 2) Any small-stakes game.

Nickel-Dime-Quarter Game


Nickel-dime-quarter (A small-stakes home game, with those being the chip sizes and betting limits. Usually, five cents is the smallest bet permitted and 25 cents the largest. Sometimes the nickel refers to the ante, the dime the minimum bet, and the quarter the largest. Also, quarter game.).

Nickels and Dimes


Dime store (In lowball, a 10-5. For all meanings, also called nickels and dimes, Woolworth, or Barbara Hutton.).

Nina


9 (the card or the lowball hand)

Nina Ross


9 (the card or the lowball hand)

Nine


In high poker, three 3s

Nine Miles


Nine.

Nine-Way Hand


1) Nine-way straight. 2) In the 52-card deck, a hand containing four cards to a flush.

Nine-Way Straight


In the 53-card deck, open-ended straight.

Nit


To bide your time, patiently waiting for a playable hand.

Nits and Lice


In high poker, two small pair, usually 3s and 2s. Also called mites and lice, mits and mites.

No Gypsy


In the larger double-limit games, usually above 15-30, with a live blind, the situation in which players are not permitted to open by just calling the blind, that is, opening with a bet the same size as the blind. Thus, the minimum opening bet is always two bets.

No Pair


1) In high poker, a hand lower than one pair, usually named by its high card, as, for example, ace high. 2) In lowball, any hand without a pair. No pair usually implies a hand topped by a nondescript high card, as a 10 or worse, but some needle artists show down a good hand, like a 6, accompanied by the announcement, "No pair."

No Peeky


A poker game played only in private or home games, a form of five- or seven-card stud in which each player gets all his cards face down, and is not permitted to look at them. The first player to the left of the dealer rolls (that is, turns face up) one card, at which point there is a round of betting. The second player then rolls as many cards as it takes to beat what the first player has exposed, at which point there is another round of betting. This continues on around, with each player rolling only as many cards as it takes to beat the previous player's exposed cards, followed at each such point by a round of betting. If at any point a player exposes five cards that cannot beat the player to his right, that player is out. Sometimes called beat your neighbor.

No Room.


I have a full house.

No Vacancy.


I have a full house.

No-Brainer


A hand so good that it can be correctly played even by someone with no brains. In lowball that would be a good 6 or better, and in high, aces full or better

No-Limit / no Limit Poker


A poker game in which players can bet as much as they have in front of them on any given round.

Nonstandard Hand


Any of various hands not usually recognized as having value in card rooms and casinos, generally only found in draw poker. Nonstandard hands include hands such as big dog, little dog, big cat, little cat, kilter, skip straight, blaze, and the like. Also called freak hand, special hand.

No-Peek


A class of poker games where players do not get to see their cards before betting. Rarely played in public games.

No-Rebuy Tournament


Freeze-out tournament (A tournament in which players start with a specified amount and then can buy no further chips; once they lose their chips, they are out, as opposed to a re-buy tournament. The tournament continues until one player has all the chips. As players are eliminated, they may receive prizes based on the order of their elimination.

Nose


Playing one's own money, as opposed to playing house chips.

Nose Open


On tilt (Playing poorly and irrationally due to emotional upset, often caused by the player in question having had a good hand beat by a freak draw from another player (often in complete disregard of the odds and good play) or the player having lost a pot because of his own bad play. Also called steaming, having one's nose open, opened up, unglued and being wide open). "He's got his nose open." Sometimes nose wide open.

Nose Picker


The joker. (Look at a plastic deck.)

Nose Wide Open


On tilt ( Playing poorly and irrationally due to emotional upset, often caused by the player in question having had a good hand beat by a freak draw from another player (often in complete disregard of the odds and good play) or the player having lost a pot because of his own bad play. Also called steaming, having one's nose open, opened up, unglued and being wide open). "He's got his nose open." Sometimes nose wide open.

No-Spotter


An ace, deuce, trey, or the joker, so called because when the card is lying face down and you lift its lower right corner you see no spots. Some lowball players couple the knowledge that a card could be one of these but that they don't know which one with game theory to decide on whether or not to bet.

Not Playing with a Full Deck


An honest deck, that is, one containing all the cards. From this came the phrase playing with a full deck, which originally meant playing honestly, but was later expanded to mean rationally, and usually used in the negative as not playing with a full deck, that is, crazy or crazily.

Notch


Just barely beat someone, usually by one card. In lowball, if your 8-6-7-3-2 loses to a 8-6-7-3-A, or, in hold 'em, your pair of aces K-Q-7 is beat by a pair of aces K-Q-8, you have been notched.

-Nothing


In lowball, 4-3-2-A; always preceded by the rank of the highest card in the hand.

Nubbin


A very small amount of chips, or a very small profit.

Nucleus Players


The regular players in a game, usually a home or private game; those players around whom the game is built.

Number Five


In ace-to-five lowball, 6-5-4-3-A.

Number Four


In ace-to-five lowball, 6-5-4-2-A.

Number Hand


In ace-to-five lowball, a 6 or wheel (sometimes a "good" 7); so called because players often refer to these hands by their positions on the scale of hands, starting with number one for a wheel, number two for a 6-4, and so on.

Number One


In ace-to-five lowball, a wheel (A-2-3-4-5.).

Number Seven


In ace-to-five lowball, 7-4-3-2-A.

Number Six


In ace-to-five lowball, 6-5-4-3-2.

Number Three


In ace-to-five lowball, 6-5-3-2-A.

Number Two


In ace-to-five lowball, 6-4-3-2-A.

Number Two Man


Seconds dealer (A mechanic (card manipulator) whose specialty is dealing the second card from the top. The reason for such a move is to hold back the top card, which he knows because he has peeked it, until he can deal it to himself, to a confederate, or to someone he is trying to cheat. Sometimes second dealer. Also called deuce dealer.)

Numero Uno


In lowball, a wheel (A-2-3-4-5.).

Nursing


1) Fondling one's cards. 2) Playing extremely conservatively, usually with a small stack; usually followed by [one's] chips or stack.

Nut


1) Daily requirement. When a player refers to his nut, he means how much he has to win just to "break even." Anything over that is "gravy." 2) Overhead. For a card room, the nut is expenses, beyond which comes the profit. 3) Difficult situation; usually part of the phrase tough nut to crack. 4) In hold 'em, pertaining to the best possible hand at a given point in a pot; usually followed by flush or straight, sometimes by high or low.

Nut Flush


In hold 'em, pertaining to the best possible hand at a given point in a pot; usually followed by flush or straight, sometimes by high or low.

Nut Hand


In a given situation, an unbeatable hand.

Nut High


In any high-low game with community cards, the highest possible hand based on the cards showing.

Nut Low


In any high-low game with community cards, the lowest possible hand based on the cards showing.

Nut Straight


In hold 'em, pertaining to the best possible hand at a given point in a pot; usually followed by flush or straight, sometimes by high or low.

Nut-Nut


In any high-low game, having both the best possible low and high. In a community card game, this means the best possible based on the cards showing.

Nuts


1) Very good hand; usually preceded by the. "Every time I get a good hand, they show me the nuts." Also, the berries, a duke, the Holy City, the Brazilians, the Brass Brazilians, the Royal Brazilians, the como se llamos, the watchamacallits, los cojones, the golyoonies, the World's Fair, and others. 2) The best possible hand at a given point in a pot.

Nuts Player


Someone who plays only the nuts, that is, a conservative player who rarely makes large bets (in a no-limit game) or rarely initiates the betting or raising (in a limit game), and then usually only with a strong hand

Nutted Up


1) Rocked up, that is, describing a very tight game, one full of nuts players. 2) Having made the nuts. "Just my luck: trying to bluff a rock when he's nutted up."

OB


Open Blind (Game in which the player to the dealer's left blinds the pot, that is, puts in a bet equal to the limit of the game before receiving his cards.)

Ocho


Spanish for 8, and used to refer to the card.

Odd Chip


When splitting a pot sometimes a chip is left over, usually of the smallest denomination for the game. That chip is called the odd chip, and various rules come into play to determine which player gets the chip.

Odds


The probability of making a hand versus the probability of not making the hand. If you have a 25% chance of making a hand, the odds are 3 to 1 against your making it. In poker, this is especially important in considering pot odds.

Off the Street


Pertaining to winning a hand very early in a playing session, often by having been dealt very good cards. If you sit down at a newly-vacated seat, and, within a few minutes raise with a good hand, get a lot of action, and win a big pot, someone is sure to say, "Right off the street

Office


To give someone a signal; usually implies a secret signal between thieves or scammers, sometimes letting a partner know the holdings of another player (in which case the signal is also known as a sign).

Office Hours


1) In high poker, two pair, 9s and 5s or 8s and 4s. 2) In lowball, a 9-5 hand. 3) In any high poker game, a full house involving 9s and 5s or 8s and 4s. 4) A straight, 5 to 9. 5) A straight, 4 to 8.

Off-Suit


Not of the same suit, especially in reference to hole cards. Sometimes abbreviated to just "off. "I'll play KT off suit occasionally, but never in early position.

Off-Suited


Not of the same suit, especially in reference to hole cards. Sometimes abbreviated to just "off. "I'll play KT off suit occasionally, but never in early position.

Ogier


The jack of spades.

Okie Bankroll


A wad of bills, usually folded over, with a bill of large denomination on the outside, to give the appearance of a large bankroll. Also called Philadelphia bankroll.

Okie Buster


The joker.

Oklahoma Bankroll


A wad of bills, usually folded over, with a bill of large denomination on the outside, to give the appearance of a large bankroll. Also called Philadelphia bankroll.

Oldsmobile


1) In lowball, a 9-8 hand. 2) In high poker, two pair, 9s and 8s. 3) In hold 'em, 9-8 (sometimes, rarely, 8-8, which is more commonly called little Oldsmobile) as one's two starting cards. 4) In lowball, a pair of 8s (that is, an 88; this use is rare).

Omaha


A variant of Hold'em where each player receives 4 hole cards and must use exactly two of them (together with 3 of 5 board cards) to make a hand. Often played high-low split with an 8 qualifier for low.

Omaha / 8


High-low split Omaha, with an 8-or-better qualifier for low.

On


1) Up to; that is, referring to the person on whom the action has stalled. "Who's it on?" means "Whose turn is it?" 2) In agreement; usually about a bet, a proposition, or a drink pot. "Are we on?" might mean, "In reference to my suggestion that we both put all our chips in the pot and take four cards, will you go along with me in this sporting endeavor?"

On a Rush


In the middle of a rush.

On a Streak


In the middle of a streak.

On Bet


The first wager made in any betting round. This usage is obsolete.

On Board


1) On the table; in the game. 2) In hold 'em, describing the community cards. 3) In stud games, describing a player's up cards.

On Deck


On board (On the table; in the game.).

On his Own


On the nose (Playing one's own money, as opposed to playing house chips (playing as a stake player or (rarely) shill). Sometimes used by the management to describe a player who went broke while playing a stake or cow and is now playing on his own money. "On the nose he never blows." When the new shift comes in, you may hear the shift manager of the departing shift tell the new shift manager, "Smiley's on the nose." This presumably refers to a player who ordinarily plays only stake. Also, on his own.)

On One's Belly


Honestly, in the sense of not cheating.

On the Board


1) Having one's name listed for a particular game. "Are you on the board for the twenty?" means "Are you on the list for the $20-limit game?". 2) Pertaining to one's board.

On the Button


In the button position. "I was on the button, so I figured I could open light."

On the Come


1) Describing a bet made on an unmade hand before all the cards have been dealt, or in the anticipation of making a hand. In lowball, this is usually whatever you're drawing to; in high (draw, stud, or hold 'em), it is usually four cards to a straight, flush, or straight flush. To raise on the come means to start with four cards to a good hand that is not yet made, and raise the pot before the draw to build a larger pot, with the hope of making the hand and having a larger pot to bet into after the draw. A player who starts with A-2-3-4-K in lowball and raises is raising on the come. To bet on the come usually means to bet as just described; sometimes to make a blind bet after the draw after having drawn one card to a come hand. (A come hand is a hand that needs one card on the come.)2) A hand that is drawing to a straight or flush.

On the Cuff


Pertaining to unsecured card room credit. "Can I have some chips on the cuff?" means the asker will pay back the money if he wins, or, if he loses, at some future unspecified time. Also on the finger, on the sleeve

On the Finger


On the cuff (Pertaining to unsecured card room credit. "Can I have some chips on the cuff?" means the asker will pay back the money if he wins, or, if he loses, at some future unspecified time.)

On the Flop


Pertaining to the flop in hold 'em.

On the Nose


Playing one's own money, as opposed to playing house chips (playing as a stake player or (rarely) shill). Sometimes used by the management to describe a player who went broke while playing a stake or cow and is now playing on his own money. "On the nose he never blows." When the new shift comes in, you may hear the shift manager of the departing shift tell the new shift manager, "Smiley's on the nose." This presumably refers to a player who ordinarily plays only stake. Also, on his own.

On the Outside


Not an employee of a card room, that is, a live player; usually preceded by on the. "Doesn't Hector work here?" "Nah, he's on the outside."

On the Rail


Busted, that is, out of action, in the sense of being forced to watch the games from the rail.

On the River


The last card dealt in a hand of stud or Hold'em.

On the Sheet


Playing stake or cow.

On the Shelf


Not currently down, that is, in a game; said of a stake player. Comes from the shelf, where a stake player's chips are kept when he is between playing sessions

On the Side


Referring to money that goes into or belongs in a side pot. "Jim's out of chips, so Bill's last bet goes on the side

On the Sleeve


On the cuff (Pertaining to unsecured card room credit. "Can I have some chips on the cuff?" means the asker will pay back the money if he wins, or, if he loses, at some future unspecified time. Also on the finger).

On the Square


1) Describing a deck all four of whose edges are smooth, that is, having no trimmed cards to be identified by feel by a thief (such as belly strippers or end strippers or any other form of strippers). 2) By extension, describing an honest game, someone playing honestly, or, in the "real world," any honest situation. "He's playing on the square" means he's not cheating

On the Turn


Pertaining to the fourth up card (the turn card) in hold 'em.

On the Up-and-Up


Pertaining to an honest game or situation.

On Tilt


Playing poorly and irrationally due to emotional upset, often caused by the player in question having had a good hand beat by a freak draw from another player (often in complete disregard of the odds and good play) or the player having lost a pot because of his own bad play. Also called steaming, having one's nose open, opened up, unglued and being wide open.

On Top


Out of a hand, usually said by a player as he chooses not to participate in a pot, as, "I'm on top." The expression comes from pan.

One


1) A one-card draw, usually preceded by the. "Check to the one." 2) An ace. "I have three ones."

One Pair


1) In high, a hand containing one pair, plus three other unmatched cards. In high games, this is the second-lowest rank of hand, ranking above no pair and below two pair. 2) In lowball, a hand that paired.

One-Card Draw


A hand that needs one card, as, in high draw poker, a four-flush or a four-straight, or, in lowball, four cards to a wheel plus a king.

One-End Straight


A particular inside straight, four cards to a straight open at one end only, either A-2-3-4, which becomes a straight by the addition of any 5, or J-Q-K-A, which becomes a straight by the addition of any 10. This is more restricted than a one-way straight.

One-Ended Straight


One-end straight.

One-Ender


One-end straight

One-Eyed


The jack of hearts, jack of spades or king of diamonds. So named because the characters are drawn in profile, thus showing only one eye.

One-Eyed Jacks


The jack of spades and the jack of hearts.

One-Eyed King


The king of diamonds.

One-Eyed Man in the Game


A code expression, usually used among thieves or those "in the know," that there is a cheater in the game.

One-Eyes


Face cards with the figure shown in profile, which, in a standard deck, are the two one-eyed jacks and the king of diamonds. Also called profiles

One-Gap


A hold'em starting hand in which the two cards are two apart in rank.

One-Gapper


Inside straight.

One-Handed Deal


A method of dealing cards, using only one hand, performed generally only by a one-armed player, by flipping the cards one-handed from the top of the deck

One-on-One


Describing a situation in which (only) two players are in contention for a pot. This is similar to head-to-head.

One-Table Satellite


A special satellite tournament, consisting of one table of players, whose prize is usually a buy-in for a larger tournament. Such a tournament is often conducted just before a major tournament, often at the site of that tournament. One-table satellites usually have just one winner; sometimes second place is awarded a free entry to another tournament.

One-Twoing


A form of cheating in which two thieves work as a team against one player.

One-Way Action


1) Marked cards whose backs have asymmetric designs or patterns, such that their rank or suit can be determined by which way they are placed within the deck. 2) One-on-one (Describing a situation in which (only) two players are in contention for a pot. This is similar to head-to-head.).

One-Way Cards


Cards with asymmetric pictures or designs on their backs, so that each back has a clear "up" and "down."

One-Way Straight


Inside straight.

Open


1) Be the first to bet on the first round. 2) Occupying the position of having to either bet or throw your cards away. "Whose open is it?" 3) Pertaining to face-up cards in a stud game.

Open at Both Ends


Pertaining to an open-ended straight.

Open Blind


1) Game in which the player to the dealer's left blinds the pot, that is, puts in a bet equal to the limit of the game before receiving his cards. 2) Open the pot without first having looked at one's cards.

Open Blind and Straddle


Game in which the player to the dealer's left blinds the pot, that is, puts in a bet equal to the limit of the game before receiving his cards, and the player to his left raises that bet, also before receiving his cards. This has evolved into today's traveling blind game

Open Blind, Raise Blind


1) The term usually applies to a draw game, generally lowball, and is often shortened to OBRB. A game in which the first player to the dealer's left blinds the pot and the next player raises before getting his cards. Often called just raise blind. 2) This is usually part of a proposition. That is, one player asks another, "Open blind, raise blind?" This means, "If you open the pot blind, I will raise you blind."

Open Blind, Raise Blind, Reraise Blind


1) The term usually applies to a draw game, generally lowball, and is often shortened to OBRBRB. A game in which the first player to the dealer's left blinds the pot, the next player raises blind before getting his cards, and the next player raises before getting his cards. Since this puts six bets into the pot before the cards are dealt, the effect is to increase the action of the game. Often shortened to re-raise, and sometimes called raise blind. 2) This is usually part of a proposition. A player who asks another, "open blind, raise blind, re-raise blind?" is saying, "I will open the pot blind and re-raise you back blind if you promise to raise blind."

Open Cards


1) Face-up cards in a stud game; up cards 2) The community cards in hold 'em and similar games.

Open Game


A game that anyone can join, if a seat becomes available; sometimes refers to games played in private clubs or otherwise privately, as home games; more commonly refers to games in public card rooms. The opposite of a closed game.

Open Light


Open, that is, initiate the betting, with a substandard hand, usually with respect to position.

Open on Anything


A form of high draw poker with no minimum opening requirements, usually played bet-or-fold. This is opposed to jacks or better, a game in which a player must have at least a pair of jacks to open. Also called anything opens.

Open on Both Ends


Pertaining to an open-ended straight

Open Pair


1) The situation in stud games in which a pair exists among the up cards of at least one player. In some games, when an open pair appears, the betting limit increases. 2) An exposed pair.

Open Poker


Stud poker, that is, the form of poker in which players start with one or more cards dealt face down, followed by cards dealt face up, one at a time, usually with a betting round after each up card, and one more for the final down card (if any Games where some of the cards are dealt face up.)

Open Seat


1) A vacant position at a poker table. 2) An available position or chair for another player.

Open Up


1) Play liberally or loosely, after having played conservatively for awhile. 2) Go on tilt (Playing poorly and irrationally due to emotional upset, often caused by the player in question having had a good hand beat by a freak draw from another player (often in complete disregard of the odds and good play) or the player having lost a pot because of his own bad play. Also called steaming, having one's nose open, opened up, unglued and being wide open).

Open-End Straight


Four cards to a straight which can be completed by drawing a card at either end.

Open-Ended Straight


Four cards to a straight which can be completed by drawing a card at either end.

Open-Ender


Four cards to a straight which can be completed by drawing a card at either end.

Opener


The one who opens or opened a pot. "It's on the opener" means, before the draw, the person who first bet has to call a raise, or, after the draw, the person who first bet now has to make a bet or pass.

Openers


1) Minimum opening requirements in a particular game. In California draw (limit), for example, a pair of jacks is openers. "Who's got openers?" means "Can anyone open the pot?", that is, does anyone have a pair of jacks or better? 2) The specific cards with which a player opened a pot in a game that has minimum opening requirements.

Open-Handed


A category of games characterized by a part of each player's hand being exposed.

Opening Bet


1) Bring-in. Also called bring-in bet. 2) Early bet

Opening Requirements


What you need to open in a game that has openers. (Minimum opening requirements in a particular game. In California draw (limit), for example, a pair of jacks is openers.).

Option


When a player posts a live blind, that player is given the option to raise when their turn comes around, even if no one else has raised; straddle.

Option Card


In stud, played in a home game, an extra card that a player can "buy" after all the cards that constitute a hand have been dealt. This card is generally a replacement for one of the player's existing cards, usually with an up card being replaced by an up card, and a down card being replaced by a down card, and often with the player having to pay for the card, that is, put extra chips in the pot, such chips not constituting a bet, because that "bet" does not have to be matched by other players. "We're playing five-card stud, high-low, with a twist." Also called discard, pitch, replacement, substitution.

Optional Card


In stud, played in a home game, an extra card that a player can "buy" after all the cards that constitute a hand have been dealt. This card is generally a replacement for one of the player's existing cards, usually with an up card being replaced by an up card, and a down card being replaced by a down card, and often with the player having to pay for the card, that is, put extra chips in the pot, such chips not constituting a bet, because that "bet" does not have to be matched by other players. "We're playing five-card stud, high-low, with a twist." Also called discard, pitch, replacement, substitution.

Oral Bet


A wager made by announcing the size of the bet but without actually putting any chips or money in the pot. In some (not all) establishments, oral declarations made in turn are binding; nonetheless, cautious players wait till the chips are actually in the pot before either calling the bet or showing their hands. Also called mouth bet, verbal bet.

Oral Declaration


A statement made by a player on his turn of his intentions: pass, fold, bet, or raise (and, in a no-limit game, how much). Also called verbal declaration

Original Hand


1) In draw poker, a player's first five cards, that is, the cards dealt before the draw. 2) In stud games with a discard (twist), the cards dealt before the discard.

Out


1) Folded, ineligible to bet or win this hand. "I'm out" is often a synonym for "I fold". 2) An out is a card that will improve your hand, usually one that you think will make it a winner. 3) In hold'em, an open-ended straight draw has eight outs (the four cards of each rank that will complete the straight).

Out of Action


1) Pertaining to a player who is on the outside, that is, busted. 2) Pertaining to a damaged deck, often one that has just had a card torn by an irate player. Right after a player loses a big pot on a bad beat, and angrily crumples the cards, the dealer might yell to the floor man, "Bring a new setup; this one's out of action

Out of Line


1) Pertaining to a bet or raise made to represent a hand better than one holds, that is, describing a bluff. 2) Describing objectionable behavior in a card room patron.

Out of Turn


Pertaining to a bet or raise made by a player before the action has come to him.

Out on a Limb


Describing a risky bet situation, usually a bluff. "I knew he was out on a limb, but I couldn't call with just an ace-high when there were two more players behind me.

Outdraw


To make a better hand than an opponent by merit of the cards you draw.

Out-of-Line Play


A bluff.

Outrun


To beat.

Outs


Cards that improve a hand, usually used with reference to a hand that is not currently the best hand. The term is most often used for hold 'em, but can be used for stud or Omaha, and sometimes even draw games.

Outside


1) Not an employee of a card room, that is, a live player; usually preceded by on the. "Doesn't Hector work here?" "Nah, he's on the outside." 2) In lowball, pertaining to a card drawn to (usually) a good hand, but either somewhat above the card that would make that the best hand possible (as when drawing to A-2-3-4, and catching a 6 or higher), or when drawing to a hand with "room" inside (that is, with space below its highest card), pertaining to a card drawn above the hand (as when drawing to 4-5-6-7, and catching an 8 or higher). If a player shows down an 8-4 and says, "I caught outside," you know he caught the 8. A player might make this remark after losing to a rough 7, and bemoaning his luck that he didn't make the wheel.

Over


1) In front of, in terms of position. "He's sitting over me" means he bets after I do. 2) In high poker, two pair; always preceded by the rank of the high pair, and sometimes followed by the rank of the low pair. Aces over is two pair, with aces as the high pair and any other pair as the low pair. Kings over 7s is two pair, kings and 7s. Also called up, when referring only to the higher pair, as kings up

Over Blind


1) Put in a blind when one is already present. In a traveling blind game, this could mean someone putting in an optional blind in addition to the mandatory blinds. In a game without mandatory blinds, this would be blinding a pot (putting in a blind) after someone else has killed it. (To put in an over blind is sometimes called to kill.) Sometimes called go the overs. 2) The blind put in by the person who over blinds. In a 3-3-6 traveling blind game ($12 limit or $12 minimum bet no-limit), John might put in $12 before getting his cards. He has doubled the limit (or the minimum bet) to $24, and he gets last action before the draw. Someone might say, "John acts last; he has the over blind." Also straddle, for both meanings.

Over Button


In some games, players can take "over" buttons that mean they're willing to play at higher limits. Any time everyone left in the hand has an over button, the limits go up.

Over the Top


Describing a raise, generally one made on top of another raise, and, in a no-limit game, often large compared to the preceding wagering; usually preceded by come. "I bet, Jim raised, and Grady came over the top for all his chips."

Overbet


1) In a no-limit game, make a bet greatly out of proportion to the size of the pot. 2) A bet greatly out of proportion to the size of the pot. 3) In pot-limit games, a bet made that is larger than the size of the pot (and which must be counted down by the dealer, so that it can be cut off at the rounded-up size of the pot).

Overcall


1) Call a bet after one or more others have already called.

Overcard


1) In hold 'em, a card among the community cards higher than a player's pair. 2) In stud games, a card (usually among your down cards) higher than any card showing among your opponents' cards.

Overcards


1) In hold 'em, cards in a player's hand that are of higher rank than the exposed cards among the community cards. 2) In stud, cards in a player's hand that are of higher rank than the exposed cards, particularly an exposed pair, among another player's up cards.

Overhand Cut


A thieving maneuver in which the cards are cut in such a way as to restore their original order.

Overhand Shuffle


A form of shuffling performed by holding the cards above the table (as opposed to the "standard" method of shuffling in which the cards remain on the table) and sliding, dropping, or tossing cards from the top of the deck held in one hand into the other hand, until all the cards are transferred to the other hand. This form of shuffling is not permitted in card rooms, but is sometimes seen in private or home games, particularly by beginners.

Overhand Stack


Shuffling the deck with an overhand shuffle in such a way as to stack the deck, that is, restore it to its original (prearranged) order while appearing to mix the cards.

Overhead


1) What a player has to pay to play, as the time collection or the drop or rake.2) For a card room, the overhead is expenses, beyond which comes the profit.

Overkill


1) Over blind. 2) Having more hand than necessary. A man calls with two pair when you have four aces; that's overkill on your part.

Overlays


In hold 'em, a player's pair higher than any pair among the community cards; in stud poker, a player's pair higher than any face-up pair

Overlook


Misread, not see; often followed by the hand, or the name of the misread card or cards. In lowball, someone might say, "I thought I had a wheel, but I overlooked my hand," or, "I overlooked the pair

Overpair


In Hold'em, a pair in the hole that is larger than any community card on the board.

Overreach


Cheat while dealing, particularly involving a dealer's long reach.

Overs


1) Over blind (Put in a blind when one is already present. In a traveling blind game, this could mean someone putting in an optional blind in addition to the mandatory blinds. In a game without mandatory blinds, this would be blinding a pot (putting in a blind) after someone else has killed it. (To put in an over blind is sometimes called to kill.) Sometimes called go the overs.); usually preceded by the. "Who's got the overs?" means "Who put in the over blind?" (and usually implies that the person who is supposed to put it in didn't, as a remark directed to the dealer of the current hand in a round from home). 2) In a two-pair hand, the higher pair; often in the situation in which two players both have the same lower pair.

Overs Button


A button designating a player who will play at a higher limit when only those who have such an arrangement remain in a pot. Two or more players in a 20-40 game, for example, might agree that when either only they are in a pot or when others fold causing only them to remain, they will play 100-200. Each player so agreeing gets an overs button

Pace


The speed of a game, with respect to its action. Fast pace describes a game with a lot of betting and raising, performed by most of the players; slow pace describes a game without much betting and raising.

Pack


The deck of cards. "Whack the pack, Jack" means "Please cut the cards."

Packed House


Full house.

Packet


Any portion of a deck of cards.

Paddle


In a card room or casino game, the spatula-shaped tool with which the house dealer drops the chips collected from each pot for the rake, or each designated time period as the time collection, into the drop box.

Pai Gow Poker


A banking game based on the Asian tile game pai gow, in which players arrange groups of tiles into two hands, which then compete severally each against the two hands played by the banker. In the card version, each player makes a wager, and then receives seven cards, which he arranges into two hands, one consisting of five cards and one of two, with the stipulation that the five-card hand must rank higher than the two-card hand. These hands, after being set (arranged), are then placed in front of the player, and then compete, one at a time, as in a blackjack game, against the banker hand (which can be held by a player or the house). If both player hands beat the dealer hand, the player wins; if both banker hands beat the player hand, the dealer wins; otherwise it is a push. If either hand is exactly the same, that counts as a win for the banker, which gives the banker hand a slight edge. The banker hand competes against player hands in an order determined by the shaking of a number of dice. (This gives the game its alternative name of shake-shake.) This order is important, because if the banker loses his stake prematurely, not all player hands may get to compete. The house makes its money by always extracting a certain fee from every player bet, prior to the actual playing of the hands (and often takes that fee whether or not the hand is even played). Apart from the rankings of the hands being the same as in poker, pai gow poker is not really poker. Also called double hand or double-hand poker.

Paint


1) Face card (King, Queen and Jack). 2) Daub (Markings put on cards with paint, ink, or some other fluid.). 3) In lowball, catch a face card (on the draw). "Paired and painted and nearly fainted" means, drawing two (or more cards), a player paired one of his original cards and also caught a face card, and now he's complaining about his luck; such a catch in lowball is the ultimate insult (and should teach the player not to draw more than one card).

Paint Cards


King, Queen and Jack; face cards; court cards; picture cards.

Painted


In lowball, having caught a face card (on the draw). "I painted."

Painter


A thief who uses daub.

Paintskin


1) Face card (King, Queen and Jack).

Pair


1) Two cards of the same rank in the same poker hand (or part of the community cards in hold 'em-type games). "I have a pair of kings." 2) One pair. 3) In various forms of draw poker, to catch a pair, when drawing to some other hand. In high draw, you can draw to a straight or flush and pair, which means you missed the hand. In lowball, you can draw to any hand and pair (which also means you missed). "I was drawing to a bicycle, but I paired.

Pair of Shorts


In high draw poker, a small pair; often any pair less than jacks; any pair smaller than the opening requirements for the game.

Pair Up


In lowball, to draw to a hand and pair one of your original cards.

Pallas


The queen of spades.

Palm


Perform the cheating maneuver of removing one or more cards from the table (for the purpose of introducing them later) or chips surreptitiously from a pot (that is, steal the chips) by the expedient of covering and concealing them with the hand.

Palm Stock


Two or more cards, arranged in a specific order, held out by a thief for later introduction into the game.

Palmed Card


A card that was removed from the table, or introduced into the game later, by a thief, by the expedient of covering and concealing it with his hand.

Palooka


Poor player. In general (no poker) usage, this term has a wider but similar application, referring to an athlete (often a boxer) of limited capabilities, or, even more generally, any inept person

Pan


1) Panguingue. 2) Three 3s, 5s, or 7s, or, sometimes, J-Q-K of spades. This usage usually comes up in a lowball game, when one player shows another his unplayable hand, says, "Pan," and then pulls out his three 5s, or other paying pan combination

Panguingue


A game resembling gin rummy played with eight decks of cards, some of the melds of which are worth payments from active players; pronounced pan-GHEE-nee, and usually shortened to pan. The game is played in many California card rooms and a few Nevada casinos.

Paper


1) Cards. "Nice paper" (used only as a spoken expression, often sarcastic) means "Good hand." (Even though most card rooms use plastic decks, players rarely say "Nice plastic.") 2) Marked cards. 3) Bad checks. Passing paper means writing bad checks

Paper Hanger


One who deliberately writes and passes bad checks.

Paper Work


Marked cards.

Paper Worker


A cheat who uses marked cards.

Papers


Marked cards.

Partner


1) The confederate of a thief. 2) A player who shares a bankroll with another.

Partners


1) Two or more thieves playing together. 2) Two or more players using the same bankroll (honestly).

Partnership


1) Two or more thieves playing together. 2) Two or more players using the same bankroll (honestly).

Party


When several loose or amateur players are making significant monetary contributions to the pot.

Pasadena.


I pass.

Pass


1) Decline to bet. This is not exactly the same as check, because in a blind game or bet-or-fold game, if you pass on the first round of betting, you must throw your cards away. 2) Decline to call a bet, at which point, you must throw your cards away and you have no further interest in the pot. If someone bets, and you say, "I pass," you are out of the pot. 3) Loosely, check.

Pass for a Prop


In a no-limit lowball game, when a player is faced with a raise, and wants to gamble alone with the raiser, usually involving a proposition like two-for-one, but there are other players to act after the player, in some clubs the player is permitted to pass for a prop, and then, if the other players do not call the bet, can negotiate a proposition with the raiser. If any other player calls the bet, usually the player who so passed is required to drop; furthermore, if the raiser does not wish to accept the proposition, the passer must also drop.

Pass Out


Fold rather than call a bet.

Pass the Buck


In a game in which the players deal for themselves (as opposed to one dealt by a house dealer), refuse to deal when it is one's turn to deal, passing the deck instead to the next player to the left. In some home games, rather than each player anteing, the dealer antes for all; in such a game, a player is not permitted to pass the deal, nor can he do so in a game with traveling blinds.

Pass the Deal


In a game in which the players deal for themselves (as opposed to one dealt by a house dealer), refuse to deal when it is one's turn to deal, passing the deck instead to the next player to the left. In some home games, rather than each player anteing, the dealer antes for all; in such a game, a player is not permitted to pass the deal, nor can he do so in a game with traveling blinds.

Pass the Trash


A form of seven stud in which cards are passed to left and right, sometimes multiple times, and sometimes with five cards chosen at the end and rolled, that is, exposed one at a time.

Pass-and-Back-in


A form of draw poker in which, before the draw, if the pot has not yet been opened, a player can, in turn, either open the pot, or pass, holding his cards for a possible call (or raise) later if someone opens behind him.

Pass-and-Out


A form of draw poker in which, before the draw, if the pot has not yet been opened, a player must, in turn, either open the pot, or fold. Also called pass-and-out or pass-out. Compare with pass-and-back-in.

Passed Out


In a double-limit draw (high) game, a pot that no one opened, and is consequently being re-dealt. The first passed pot usually has an extra ante by each player. The second passed pot usually has an extra ante and is played at a higher limit. the third and all subsequent passed pots usually stay at the same limit as the second, with no further antes.

Passed Pot


1) In a double-limit draw (high) game, a pot that no one opened, and is consequently being re-dealt. The first passed pot usually has an extra ante by each player. The second passed pot usually has an extra ante and is played at a higher limit. the third and all subsequent passed pots usually stay at the same limit as the second, with no further antes. 2) In any draw game with minimum opening requirements (such as jacks or better), a pot that was not opened either because no one had openers or no one chose to open. (Sometimes pots don't get opened even when players have openers, because some players like to pass good hands in early position, hoping that someone else will open so that they can raise.)

Passing Paper


Writing bad checks.

Passive


Passive is a style of play that is characterized by reluctance to bet and raise. This does not always mean tight. A typical loose-passive player will call with almost anything, but raise only with very powerful hands (see calling station). A passive table is one with many passive players, so that, for example, few hands are raised pre-flop

Pass-Out


A form of draw poker in which, before the draw, if the pot has not yet been opened, a player must, in turn, either open the pot, or fold. Also called pass-and-out or pass-out.

Pasteboards


1) Paper cards. 2) By extension, any cards.

Pat


1) In draw poker, describing a hand that needs to draw no cards. 2) Drawing no cards. "How many cards?" "I'm pat."

Pat Hand


In draw poker, a hand that does not need any more cards. Specifically, a straight, flush, full house or straight flush. One might bluff and represent a pat hand but actually hold something else.

Pat Hand Bluff


In high draw poker, standing pat on a hand that is not complete, with the intention of representing a good hand, thereby driving all active players out of the pot with a bet, and winning whatever is in the pot at that point. In lowball, standing pat on any five cards that do not constitute an otherwise playable lowball hand, with the same intention

Patience Poker


A form of solitaire in which the player tries to arrange 25 cards in a 5-by-5 grid such that all (or most of) the horizontals and verticals (and sometimes the diagonals) form the highest possible poker hands. Also called poker patience and poker solitaire.

Patsy


In draw poker, a hand that does not need any more cards. Specifically, a straight, flush, full house or straight flush. One might bluff and represent a pat hand but actually hold something else.

Patter


1) Misleading or distracting conversation by one player, often an experienced player, meant to precipitate a desired action in another player, such as folding or calling. 2) Conversation used by a player to cover up his own reactions to his cards.

Pay Off


To call a bet by a player you're reasonably sure has you beat. Usually you ought to have some sort of reason to do this, other than just generosity. Weak players pay you off more often than other players.

Pay Station


A player who rarely folds, thus who frequently calls better hands and loses.

Payday Game


One with higher stakes than usual, often conducted on whichever day of the month the live ones get their paychecks.

Peach


In lowball, a good hand, that is, one without a pair; used humorously. "I've got a pair." "Yeah? Well, I've got a peach!"

Pedigree


In hold 'em, K-9 as one's first two cards. Also, canine

Pedro


A 5 (the card); so called because 5s are important in the game of pedro.

Peek


1) A look at one or more cards in a hand, often those drawn. See free look. 2) A surreptitious look at cards drawn to a hand, usually in such a way as to imply that the peeker actually has not seen any of the drawn cards, prior to this person claiming (or implying to claim) that he is now making a blind bet, that is, one based on really not having seen the cards. Also, fast peek. 3) A surreptitious look by a thief at the un-dealt top or bottom card of the deck. 4) Look at drawn cards, often done by squeezing the cards, that is, slowly separating them, as if the viewer wishes to surprise himself with the cards; this is often done agonizingly slowly, frequently when it is the peeker's turn to act, as if the player deliberately wants to annoy the others, while he pretends to be innocent of any knowledge of what effect his slowness is having.

Peek Poker


Seven-card stud.

Peeker


A cheater (such as a bottom dealer or seconds dealer) who peeks at the un-dealt top card of the deck (prior to possibly dealing a second) or the bottom card (prior to dealing a bottom), or who exposes such card to a confederate.

Peep-and-Turn


Mexican Stud. A form of five-card stud in which each player first receives two cards face down, and then rolls (turns face up) one card, followed by a betting round. Thereafter, each active player receives another face-down card on each round, from which he chooses one to roll, again followed by a betting round. Sometimes called flip.

Peewees


Small cards (in rank).

Peg


Mark the fronts of cards with a pin, thumbtack, ring, etc., in such a way that the thief making such marks can later tell by feel the ranks of the cards. Such marks are applied to the surface of cards and do not tear the cards, merely add indentations that can be felt from the back, as opposed to nailing, which puts marks in the edges of cards. Also called punch or blister. This is the opposite of prick, in which the thief marks the backs of cards.

Peg Work


The marks put on cards as described under peg

Pelter


In draw poker, a nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game. The hand is different in different parts of the country. One variant is any hand containing a 9, 5, and a 2, with one card between the 9 and the 5 and another between the 5 and the 2.

Penny Ante


Describing a small game, often referring to small limit; usually part of the phrase penny-ante game. The phrase has passed into general usage meaning petty or small-time. "We're playing penny ante."

Penny Poker


Describing a small game, often referring to small limit; usually part of the phrase penny-ante game. The phrase has passed into general usage meaning petty or small-time

Penny-Ante


Describing a small game, often referring to small limit; usually part of the phrase penny-ante game. The phrase has passed into general usage meaning petty or small-time

Penny-Ante Game


A small home poker game, in which the stakes generally are literally pennies. Sometimes shortened to simply penny ante.

Penultimate


The next-to-last card in the deck.

Penultimate Card


The next-to-last card in the deck.

Percentage


1) The edge or money odds a player has or thinks he has in making a particular call. Frequently a player who calls a bet to take a longshot draw or extra card announces, "Percentage"; he is often taking much the worst of it.

Percentage Bet


A bet (often a blind bet) made in a situation in which you have the best of it. This kind of bet is often made in lowball, when both players are drawing cards, and the first player is drawing no more than the second. The first player now either openly bets blind, or pretends to look at his draw card, but doesn't actually see it, and bets blind in actuality. Since the opponent makes a 9 or better (the worst hand with which many players call) less than 43% of the time, even with a one-card draw, the first player has the best of it, and his bet is termed a percentage bet

Percentage Call


A call made by a player in a situation in which he is a decided underdog, because he is getting better (usually substantially better) than a 1-to-1 return on his investment.

Percentage Player


Someone who plays--that is, calls bets or raises, or makes them--only when she thinks she has the best of it on that wager.

Perfect


1) Perfect low (In a high-low game, the lowest possible hand, often A-2-3-4-5, or, in lowball, the same hand, where it is often called a wheel or bicycle.). "I have a perfect." 2) In lowball, pertaining to the lowest hand of the rank of the highest card, that is, containing 4-3-2-A plus one other card 7 or higher.

Perfect Catch


Receiving precisely the card you need to make your hand. In lowball, this means drawing the lowest card that doesn't pair one of your own, as, for example, catching an ace to 2-3-4-5. In draw high, this means making the best possible straight or flush, or even straight flush, you can make in a one-card draw. In a stud game, this means catching the one card that makes your hand as good as possible.

Perfect Low


In a high-low game, the lowest possible hand, often A-2-3-4-5, or, in lowball, the same hand, where it is often called a wheel or bicycle.

Perfect Pack


A good, honest deck, that is, one consisting of either 52 or 53 cards, with no marks, intentional or otherwise.

Perfect-Perfect


A hand made on the last two cards. A player holding 55, with a board of AA455, in that order, makes runner-runner quads.

Perimeter of the Pot


An undefined line toward the center of the table surface when determining whether or not a player must be forced to complete a bet. If there is a line, the perimeter of the pot coincides with the line.

Philadelphia


I have a full house.

Philadelphia Bankroll


A wad of bills, usually folded over, with a bill of large denomination on the outside, to give the appearance of a large bankroll. Also called Oklahoma bankroll or Michigan bankroll.

Philosopher


In English slang, a thief or cheat at cards.

Pick


A diamond or spade pip.

Pick Off


Catch someone bluffing.

Pick Someone Up


Remove a player from a game, usually by the management. If a player leaves a full table for whatever reason (such as to have a meal, try to get more playing capital, go outside for a smoke) and does not return within a specified amount of time (such as, depending on the card room, 20 minutes, half an hour, 45 minutes), the floor man might elect to pick him up. "You've been gone for nearly an hour, and the other players were complaining, so we had to pick you up. Your chips are in the cage."

Pick Up


Leave a game.

Pick Up a Hand


In someone's absence, play his cards for him; usually followed by for. "I gotta go to the can; can you pick up a hand for me?"

Pick Up on


Catch on to, generally implying noticing someone cheating. "Yeah, I came off the bottom, but I don't think anyone picked up on it."

Pick Up Someone's Chips


Remove a player from a game, usually by the management. If a player leaves a full table for whatever reason (such as to have a meal, try to get more playing capital, go outside for a smoke) and does not return within a specified amount of time (such as, depending on the card room, 20 minutes, half an hour, 45 minutes), the floor man might elect to pick him up. "You've been gone for nearly an hour, and the other players were complaining, so we had to pick you up. Your chips are in the cage."

Pickle Man


In hold 'em, 5-7 as one's first two cards; so-called because of the Heinz slogan, "57 varieties."

Picture


King, Queen and Jack; face cards; court cards; paint cards.

Picture Cards


King, Queen and Jack; face cards; court cards; paint cards.

Pictures


Any playing cards.

Piece


A portion of one's action given away in exchange for help on the buy-in; often done in tournaments by players who don't think they have a great chance of winning, or traded by participants to increase their chances of making money. "If Doyle, Chip, or Jack finishes in the money, I'll make out okay; I've got a piece of each of them." The term point is similar.

Piece of Cheese


A terrible hand, usually said disparagingly by the actual or apparent winner of a pot about the hand that might call him, or just has. "Throw that piece of cheese in the muck."

Pig in the Poke


A form of spit in the ocean, in which one card is dealt face-up in the center, which rank is then wild in anyone's hand, but which card is not part of anyone's hand. Also called wild widow, toad in the hole.

Pigeon


A card that makes a hand, often received as the last card in a stud game.

Pig's Eye


The ace of diamonds, so called because the single diamond pip resembles the rhomboid iris of a pig's eye.

Pile


A player's stack of chips, or money.

Pin Work


Cards marked (by a cheater) with scratches on their backs, such that their ranks can be determined by feel.

Pineapple


Any of a number of variants of hold'em in which each player gets three cards and must discard one at some point (usually before or after pre-flop betting, after the flop, or after the second round of betting).

Pink Eye


Infrared (pink- or red-tinted) contact lenses worn by a thief to see the markings on luminous readers, cards marked with special luminous ink that can be seen only in infrared light. Sometimes called readers.

Pinochle


In hold 'em, Jd and Qs as the down cards. Comes from the game of pinochle.

Pip


One of the suit spots (spade, heart, diamond, club) on the face of a card. Each face card has four pips: one at each end, outside the border, under the K, Q, or J representing the card's rank and one more at each end, within the border, next to each head. Each ace has three pips, one in the center and one under the A at each end. Each card, 2-10, has two more pips than the number that represents its rank, the rank total in the central area, plus one more pip under the number at each end. (Some say that the smaller symbol beneath the number or letter designating the rank of the card is not a pip, but is part of the index, which is that number or letter plus the smaller suit symbol beneath it. In that reckoning, each face card has two pips, each ace has one, and each card, 2-10, has as many pips as the number that represents its rank.) Also called spot.

Pipe Salesman


An honest player in a public card room game, usually someone knowledgeable, whose presence deters thieves from plying their pernicious trades.

Piping


A cheating method in which a player on the rail (that is, in close proximity to a game) signals a thief in the game the holdings of a player whose cards the one doing the piping can see.

Pistol Pete


Hole card stud

Pistol Stud


Hole card stud.

Pitch


1) Twist (In stud, played in a home game, an extra card that a player can "buy" after all the cards that constitute a hand have been dealt. ). 2) Deal cards, sometimes with the implication of doing so in a cheating manner.

Pitcher


A professional card dealer.

Place Tickets


1) The second-best hand in a showdown. Comes from the horse racing term place, plus tickets, a slangy name for the cards that make up a hand. 2) A form of draw poker, found only in home games, in which the second-best hand wins.

Plain


Describing cards with numbers, that is, all but the face cards.

Plate


A device for marking cards by trimming their edges. (This produces of various sorts.)

Play


1) A bluff. "He got caught making a play. 2) Playing a hand in a nonstandard manner, not necessarily a bluff. 3) An attempt, often spectacular or by a large or desperation bet, to win a pot. "When everyone passed, he made a play for the pot." 4) A playing session. 5) Participate in a poker game. "Deal me in; I'll play." 6) Participate in a pot. "How much does it cost? I'll play."7) To play a hand in poker means to make the hand past the initial round of betting. 8) In seven card stud, this usually means calling the bring-in. 9) In hold'em, this means calling the big blind.

Play Back


To raise or re-raise an opponent's bet.

Play Behind


1) The situation in which a player has called for chips, say from a chip person, and has not yet received those chips, but can have action on that amount of money in case he gets involved in a pot. A player might say before receiving his cards, "Dealer, I'm playing $100 behind." 2) Agree to call any bet, as if the player had an unlimited stack. If the bet is more than his chips, he buys more as needed. This is not normally permitted in a table stakes game, but is sometimes found in private games.

Play Behind a Log


Describing a situation in which a player is far ahead of a game and thus playing only premium hands.

Play Blind


Bet or raise without looking at one's cards.

Play by the Book


"The book" is a mythical set of instructions supposedly containing the poker wisdom of the ages. A player speaks of "playing by the book," by which he means he is playing a hand the way he thinks it is supposed to be played; such players usually think "playing by the book" is equivalent to playing tight. Actually, there is no book.

Play Catchup


When losing, bet recklessly, often desperately, in the hope of getting of even. "How's he doing?" "Stuck, and chasing."

Play Fast


1) Play recklessly; gamble excessively; speed. 2) Play aggressively, betting and raising as often as possible, and, in a no-limit game, as much as permitted.

Play Off the Blind


1) In a winner blind game, a player wanting to leave just after winning a pot usually gets dealt one more hand so that he can exercise the option to have last action on the hand. That is, the winner of the previous pot is supposed to be dealt a hand. To play this one more hand is to play off the blind. 2) Similarly, in a traveling blind game, a player wanting to leave the table (for a break, for example) might wait until she has taken both (or all three, in a three-blind traveling blind game) blinds before leaving. To do this is also to play off the blind

Play Over


Play in a player's seat while that player is absent from the table for an extended period of time. A player playing over someone plays his own chips, as opposed to one picking up a hand for someone. When someone plays over someone else, he must get up when the owner of the seat returns. He also moves immediately into the next available open seat if one opens up while he's still playing over.

Play Pat


In a draw game, decline to draw cards when it is time to draw, that is, indicate a pat hand.

Play the Board


In hold 'em, use all of the board (community) cards to determine one's best hand. When this happens, if no active player can use one or both of his or her dealt cards to form a better hand than that of the five board cards, the pot is split among all active players.

Play the Nuts


Play only hands that are almost guaranteed to win.

Play Through the Blind


In a traveling blind game, a player wanting to leave the table (for a break, for example) might wait until she has taken both (or all three, in a three-blind traveling blind game) blinds before leaving. To do this is also to play through the blind

Play Tight


Playing tight simply means playing fewer hands and folding them earlier.

Play Up


Play in liberal fashion. The opposite is to play tight.

Play with


Staying in the hand by betting, calling, raising, or re-raising.

Player


1) Any participant in a poker game. "There are eight players at each table." 2) Any participant in a particular pot. "Even after the raise, there were still five players in the pot." 3) Someone who knows what's going on in the card room milieu, and usually implying someone making his living playing cards. "Who's that guy putting all the chips in the pot? Some live one?" "Nah, he's a player."

Player's Bank


A fund on deposit by a player with the management of a card room, from which he can withdraw cash to play on, or to which he can add his winnings, and which he can, of course, clear out at any time. This is a convenient means for a player to get around the difficulty of carrying large amounts of cash on his person. The player's bank is usually kept track of on a ledger card with transactions initialled by the player or a house official or both. The cashier is usually responsible for keeping the records straight.

Playing Behind a Log


Describing a situation in which a player is far ahead of a game and thus playing only premium hands.

Playing Card


Any one card in a deck.

Playing S & M


Sklansky & Malmuth. Generally refers to the ideas and algorithms published by these two authors. When used in a 7-card stud context, often refers to '7 Card Stud For Advanced Players', and when used in a Hold'em context, often refers to 'Texas Hold 'em For Advanced Players'.

Playoff


In some tournaments, the final portion, in which the winners of previous levels compete.

Playover Box


A plastic box set over the chips of a player on break while another player plays over the absent player. The purpose of a playover box is to make sure the chips of the two players don't accidentally get mixed together.

Plug


1) A chip, a stack of chips, or a token of some sort (sometimes labeled "hold") set down by the house at any empty position to indicate that no one may sit there. The house may place a plug because a player has asked to hold his seat while he goes to get more cash, or because it wants to keep the seating arrangements balanced.

Plunge Around


To play more loosely than you should. Also Splash Around.

Poch


An early German card game having some of the features of poker. (Pochen means to boast of, which could be construed as to bluff.)

Poche


An early German card game having some of the features of poker. (Pochen means to boast of, which could be construed as to bluff.)

Pochen


An early German card game having some of the features of poker. (Pochen means to boast of, which could be construed as to bluff.)

Pocket


1) The first two cards in hold 'em, that is a player's "private cards" (as opposed to the community cards or flop). "I had a king in the pocket." 2) The down card or down cards in a stud game.

Pocket Cards


The two cards dealt to you face down in hold'em, or the first two face down in seven card stud are your pocket cards, or hole cards. Hold'em players tend to call them pocket cards, stud players tend to call them hole cards.

Pocket Pair


Generic Hold'em term for 2 hole cards of the same rank.

Pocket Rockets


In Hold'em, a pair of aces for hole cards.

Point


A percentage of one's action given away in exchange for help on the buy-in; often done in tournaments by players who don't think they have a great chance of winning, or traded by participants to increase their chances of making money. Similar to piece

Points


A side bet, made in a draw game, between two or more players, in which the player holding more than 40 points receives a prearranged payment (say one chip) for each point he holds over 40. Aces count 11 (sometimes only 1), face cards 10, and the others have face value. Such an arrangement would likely be made in a lowball game, so that players might feel that they can win something on otherwise unplayable hands. Often played in conjunction with colors.

Poke


1) A bankroll. 2) The place where one keeps that bankroll, as a wallet or purse.

Pokeno


A commercial board game that combines some of the elements of poker with those of other games.

Poker


Card Game. Poker is commonly played in card rooms (often within casinos) and in private home games (illegally in many states). The games played in card rooms seem to divide into stud games, draw games, and flop games. In home games, however, anything goes, including games that seem to have no reason to be called poker. The varieties played in home games probably number in the hundreds, or even the thousands. Some common card room games include Texas Hold'em, Seven Card Stud, Omaha, Razz, Lowball and Pineapple.

Poker Clack


An apparently sad nonverbal sound (a sort of tsk-like click) made by a player who in reality has a good hand. The term was invented by Mike Caro, and described in his books, columns, and videos about tells.

Poker Clergy


Poker players.

Poker Club


1) An establishment, usually open to the public, in which players gather to play poker. This definition is somewhat more restricted than a card room, in which any form of cards may be played (bridge, gin rummy, California games, for example). 2) A group of players who meet regularly to play poker, usually in the home of one player or alternating among the homes of various players, or at a private club.

Poker Dice


1) Dice that have card symbols, usually ranking from 9 through ace, one of each, on each die, three, four, or five of which are shaken in a cup and then thrown out. When several players compete, the player throwing the best poker hand combination wins. Sometimes players are allowed to "draw" to a hand, by leaving some of the dice on the table or counter top and shaking and tossing the remainder. 2) A set of five ordinary dice, thrown similarly for poker hands. Flushes are not possible, but pairs, aces through sixes, two pair, and so on, and two straights (1-2-3-4-5 and 2-3-4-5-6) are possible.

Poker Face


A poker player's supposed lack of facial expression, such that others cannot tell whether she is bluffing. In reality, few poker players remain expressionless doing play.

Poker Flat


A place where poker players play; card room.

Poker God


A mythical deity to whom poker players supposedly pray for good hands, and who presumably protects those in his (her?) good graces; used humorously.

Poker Hand


The five cards (usually) that a poker player uses in his contention for a pot. Some of the possible five-card combinations from the poker deck have higher (or lower, in low games) ranking than others, and this is how the winner of a particular contest is determined.

Poker Joint


A place where poker players play; card room.

Poker Machine


Video poker machine (A computerized slot machine (video slot machine) based on draw poker (but not really a form of poker), with card symbols, on which players try to make certain poker hand combinations, a casino game that can sometimes be beaten by skill, the fastest-growing form of mechanized gambling.).

Poker Patience


A form of solitaire in which the player tries to arrange 25 cards in a 5-by-5 grid such that all (or most of) the horizontals and verticals (and sometimes the diagonals) form the highest possible poker hands. Also called patience poker and poker solitaire.

Poker Player


One who plays poker.

Poker Professional


One who plays poker for a living.

Poker Room


A place where poker players play; card room.

Poker Rules


The regulations of a particular card room on the conduct of a poker game, often codified in that card room's rule book, sometimes posted on the wall. Poker rules are not standard, although most rule books contain many similar rules. Some rules (frequently termed the rules of poker), such as what hand beats what, are fairly standard, particularly in public card rooms, while others, such as what constitutes a legitimate bet or raise and the manner in which betting must be made, vary widely. The smart player familiarizes herself with the poker rules of a particular establishment before first sitting down to play.

Poker School


People assembled to play poker. Sometimes called simply school. Also, poker clergy.

Poker Session


1) With respect to a given player, a period of playing cards, from the point at which the player first sits down to the table until he cashes out (or leaves the table broke). 2) With respect to a group, the period of time for which the game lasts, from the deal of the first hand until it breaks up for lack of players, or due to a prearranged ending time. For both meanings, sometimes called poker session.

Poker Sharp


An expert poker player, often implying one who wins by cheating, usually by manipulating the cards; a mechanic. Also known as a cardsharp, sharp, or sharper.

Poker Solitaire


A form of solitaire in which the player tries to arrange 25 cards in a 5-by-5 grid such that all (or most of) the horizontals and verticals (and sometimes the diagonals) form the highest possible poker hands. Also called patience poker and poker patience.

Poker Table


1) A table used in card rooms especially for the play of poker. Most poker tables have a felt cover. Poker tables for draw or stud games generally accommodate eight players, with an extra place for the house dealer, if there is one. Poker tables for hold 'em games can accommodate as many as 12 or 13 players, although nine or 10 is more common. 2) Any table on which to play poker. In home games, this can be the kitchen table, or a fancy table with seven or eight places having recessed chip racks and drink holders at each position.

Poker Tournaments


A poker tournament is an event in which poker players compete for all or part of a prize pool.

Poker with the Joker


1) Any poker game in which a joker is used. Also called joker poker. 2) High draw poker played with a 53-card deck (that is, one containing a joker)

Poker-Faced


Having a poker face.

Pokerino


Poker played for very low stakes, often found in retirement homes, convalescent hospitals, and the like.

Pokerist


A poker player. This usage is rare.

Pone


The player sitting to the dealer's immediate right.

Pool


In English poker games, the pot.

Pop it


Raise

Poque


An early French card game, from which some say the word poker came. The French pronunciation of the word is like poker without the r sound.

Position


1) Where a player sits in relation to the others at the table. 2) Where a player sits in relation to the dealer, or, sometimes, in relation to the blinds. Position 1 is generally the position to the left of the current dealer.

Position Bet


A position bet is a bet made more on the strength of one's position than on the strength of one's hand. A player on the button in hold'em is in good position to steal the pot if no one else opens.

Position Player


Someone who plays position, that is, who is more or less liberal with his opening requirements and more or less aggressive in the play of his hands, dependent on his position with respect to the other players, or one vulnerable player in particular.

Positive Expectation


The situation in which a particular bet, in the long run, has an overall average profit. A wager can lose more times than it wins and still have a positive expectation; this is because in the long run the amount of money won on the times it wins is greater than the amount lost on the times it loses. Also called positive return.

Positive Return


The situation in which a particular bet, in the long run, has an overall average profit. A wager can lose more times than it wins and still have a positive expectation; this is because in the long run the amount of money won on the times it wins is greater than the amount lost on the times it loses. Also called positive expectation.

Possible


1) In high poker, a hand that needs one card to be completed, as four cards to a flush or straight.

Possible Straight / Flush


Up cards that quite possibly could lead to a straight and/or a flush.

Post


Put up a missed blind. If you miss playing the blind in a particular round, probably because you were away from the table or because you just came into a game and the blind has already passed you, the house dealer asks if you want to post, that is, put in as many chips as are in the blind you missed. When the action gets to you, you have already called one bet, and, if the pot has not been raised, you do not have to put any more chips in the pot. (You can, of course, raise in turn.) This is not the same as an over blind or kill, in which the action temporarily skips the player who has put the blind chips in the pot, and which causes the limit to increase.

Post Mortem


An exhaustive discussion after a hand is over about the play of the hand, with so-called experts giving their opinions (with the loser usually providing the most strident) on how the hand should have been played.

Post Oak Bluff


In a no-limit game, a minimal bet made into a large pot by the holder of a marginal hand in the hopes that the bet won't be raised and the bettor will either win the pot because no better hand is out, or that he will get to see the best hand "for free" because the holder of a slightly better hand is afraid to raise. Also, protection bet.

Pot


1) The chips in play on a particular hand. "They both had straight flushes and the pot was over $1000." 2) The portion of the table in which the pots in play on a particular hand go. "Is that money in the pot?" might be what the house dealer asks a player who is toying with a stack of chips very near to the perimeter of the pot. 3) The interval of time from the deal of cards until the showdown. 4) Make an arrangement to pay for drinks, sandwiches, etc., out of the next pot over a certain amount (usually twice the cost of whatever they're potting for); often followed by for. An example is a drink pot. "Let's order a round. Who wants to pot?" "Who wants to pot for cigarettes?"

Pot a!.


A player who announces this has just won his first pot of the session.

Pot Limit


A game where the maximum bet is determined by the size of the pot at the time. Note that a player wanting to raise first calls the bet, then totals the pot to determine the maximum amount he can raise.

Pot Odds


The amount of money in the pot versus the amount of money it will cost you to continue in the hand.

Pothook


A 9 (the card).

Pot-Limit Dig


A pot-limit game not played for table stakes, that is, one in which players can take money out of their pockets if they run out of chips in the middle of a hand. This is permitted only in private games, never in public card rooms and casinos

Potstuck


Having invested so much in a pot that it "wouldn't be good poker" to fold.

Potting Out


Taking money out of a pot to buy food, cigarettes, or drinks, or to make bets.

Poverty Poker


A form of poker, usually found only in home or private games, in which a player is given a free buy-in, after going broke, on which to continue playing. Usually that buy-in must be returned to the source if the player wins, and the player must quit if he loses the free buy-in. The source for such funds either comes from a direct contribution at the time by the other players, or, more frequently, by cutting money from each pot, which money goes toward a special fund to be used for this particular purpose.

Power


1) In stud poker, the hand containing the strongest up cards, or, sometimes, the hand with the most potential (as four cards to a straight flush). 2) The holder of the hand who has been betting the most aggressively.

Powerhouse


An exceptionally strong hand, often one that cannot lose in a given situation.

Preflop


Pertaining to the bet or situation before the flop.

Premium


A bonus or royalty paid by all players to the holder of a particular hand, or a very high hand.

Premium Hand


A hand that entitles the holder of the hand to a premium (A bonus or royalty paid by all players to the holder of a particular hand, or a very high hand.). Also called special hand.

Press


Give a stake player more chips to play on, after he loses his first stack; usually equal to half of what he started with.

Presto


In Hold'em, what one says when revealing pocket 5's. This term is still evolving and subject to redefinition. The term comes from a more well-established background in Blackjack where one says "Presto!" when turning over a blackjack. When a player says "Presto!" at an appropriate time, the correct countersign is to say "Irwin". This is a method of identification, not a compulsory ritual.

Pretties


1) Chips of (relatively) large denomination. A stack of pretties is 20 $20 chips, $100 chips, etc. Also, society chips, high society chips. 2) Any particularly good hand.

Price


The pot odds you are getting for a draw or call.

Prick


Mark the backs of cards with a pin, thumbtack, or other sharp instrument, in such a way that the thief making such marks can later tell by feel the rank of the card. This is the opposite of peg, in which the thief marks the fronts of cards. Such markings are sometimes called pin work.

Primero


An early Spanish card game having some of the features of poker.

Private Game


A poker game played elsewhere than in a public card room. Also called home game. Sometimes private game has a wider application, because a private game could be played in other than someone's home (for example, in a hotel room).

Procter and Gamble


A form of stud, found exclusively in home games, in which each player receives four cards face down, and three community cards are dealt face down, and these cards are turned up one at a time, each followed by a betting round, with the last card, and all cards of the same rank, wild.

Producer


1) Someone who brings lots of money to a game and keeps that money in circulation. The term is usually used by the management to describe someone around whom a game can be built (because others like to play with him or her), or by professionals to describe a live one. Also, provider. 2) A player whose main source of income does not derive from gambling.

Profession


Cheating at cards, cardsharping, illegal gambling; always preceded by the.

Professional Gambler


A player whose main source of income derives from gambling.

Professor


A gambler who has the ability to calculate the odds, particularly in card games. Also, dean.

Profiles


The picture cards whose faces are shown in profile, that is, Kd , Js , and Jh ; the one-eyes.

Progressive


1) Describing the high draw games as used to be played in Southern California (which is not the same interpretation as in home games). They are jacks or better progressive. The California card room interpretation of progressive was a further ante after each passed pot (up to triple ante) plus a doubling of the stakes (usually once only). 2) Describing games with increasing opening requirements, such as progressive jackpots.

Progressive Jackpots


A form of draw poker found mainly in home games in which the opener must have at least a pair of jacks to open, and be prepared to show openers before the pot is out of play; if no one opens, players ante again, sometimes the next dealer deals, and the minimum opening requirements increase to queens, and so on if no one again opens. Sometimes the opening requirements after passed pots stop at aces; sometimes they continue to increase (to two pair, and so on). Pots can grow quite large from just the antes.

Progressive Poker


A form of draw poker found mainly in home games in which the opener must have at least a pair of jacks to open, and be prepared to show openers before the pot is out of play; if no one opens, players ante again, sometimes the next dealer deals, and the minimum opening requirements increase to queens, and so on if no one again opens. Sometimes the opening requirements after passed pots stop at aces; sometimes they continue to increase (to two pair, and so on). Pots can grow quite large from just the antes.

Progressive Progressive


Progressive jackpots with the ante increased (in size) each hand that is not opened. Sometimes called rangdoodles

Prop


1) Proposition player. 2) A proposition. 3) To function as a prop. "How ya keepin' in chips?" "I'm propping at the Pasatiempo Club

Prop Bet


1) The bet that arises out of a proposition. 2) The bet offered by a proposition hustler.

Prop or Proposition Player


An employee of the gaming establishment whose primary purpose is to keep enough players at a table to prevent breaking up the game for lack of players. Unlike shills "props" make a small hourly wage but play with their own money, winning or losing based on their skill.

Proposition


1) An offer by one player to another to play under certain circumstances, usually more favorable to the other player, in exchange for calling a bet. Propositions are found mainly in no-limit lowball games.

Proposition Bet


1) The bet that arises out of a proposition. 2) The bet offered by a proposition hustler.

Proposition Hustler


Someone, usually a player, who offers other players bets on certain occurrences, paying off at less than true odds.

Protect


1) Hold onto your cards, as opposed to leaving them sit on the table, such that the dealer cannot accidentally scoop up your hand, and such that it cannot be otherwise fouled. 2) Place a chip atop your cards so that no cards falling on them can foul the hand; usually followed by your hand or the hand. 3) Place a chip atop the deck (by the player dealer or the house dealer) after dealing the first round of cards, so that discards cannot accidentally get mixed in with the deck; usually followed by the deck. "Hey, dealer, protect the deck," means the cards are just sitting on the table, and a player wants the dealer to put a chip on top of the deck. 4) Bet in such a way as to increase the chances of an all-in player winning a pot, that is, ensure a showdown between only the bettor and the all-in player.

Protect a Hand


To protect a hand is to bet so as to reduce the chances of anyone outdrawing you by getting them to fold.

Protect the Other Players


Act in such a way as to not jeopardize any other player's action. Acting in turn is a way of protecting the others.

Protect your Cards


To protect your cards is to place a chip or some other small object on top of them so that they don't accidentally get mucked by the dealer, mixed with another player's discards, or otherwise become dead when you'd like to play them.

Protection


1) How a card room protects players against being cheated, including such measures as having a house dealer, using plastic cards, having floor personnel who know what to look out for, etc. 2) A protection bet.

Protection Bet


1) In a big bet game, a bet made after the draw in a draw game, or in a vulnerable position in a stud or hold 'em game, to avoid having to call a larger bet from a potentially better hand or from a possible bluff.

Provider


A provider is a poker player who makes the game profitable for the other players at the table. Similar in meaning to fish, although provider has a somehow less negative connotation. A provider might be a decent player who just happens to be playing out of his/her league. A fish is usually someone who's probably out of any league.

Public Game


A game played in a poker room, with usually a fee charged (or taken from each pot) by the establishment for the use of the premises. Compare with private game.

Public Poker


A game played in a poker room, with usually a fee charged (or taken from each pot) by the establishment for the use of the premises. Compare with private game.

Public Relations Player


An employee of the gaming establishment whose primary purpose is to keep enough players at a table to prevent breaking up the game for lack of players. Unlike shills "props" make a small hourly wage but play with their own money, winning or losing based on their skill.

Puck


A token denoting the dealer position.

Pull


Draw a card from the deck, particularly for the purpose of starting a game, with the player pulling either the highest or the lowest card becoming the first dealer. "Let's pull for deal." Also called draw for deal, pull for prime, pull prime.

Pull for Prime


Draw a card from the deck, particularly for the purpose of starting a game, with the player pulling either the highest or the lowest card becoming the first dealer. "Let's pull for deal." Also called draw for deal, pull for prime, pull prime.

Pull Prime


Draw a card from the deck, particularly for the purpose of starting a game, with the player pulling either the highest or the lowest card becoming the first dealer. "Let's pull for deal." Also called draw for deal, pull for prime, pull prime.

Pull the Film


Remove and view the tape from the surveillance camera above a table for the purpose of determining whether an alleged rules infraction took place or resolving a dispute. Pulling the tape is usually done only in extreme situations, and usually requires official action on the part of a representative of the management, say a shift manager.

Pull the Tape


Remove and view the tape from the surveillance camera above a table for the purpose of determining whether an alleged rules infraction took place or resolving a dispute. Pulling the tape is usually done only in extreme situations, and usually requires official action on the part of a representative of the management, say a shift manager.

Pull-Through


A form of false shuffling, in which the cheating dealer performs a maneuver that makes it look like he is riffling the cards, but all he does is pull half the deck through the other half, and then cuts the cards without changing their order. Also called pass.

Pump


Raise.

Pumpa


Raise; usually preceded by la. When a player says, "La pumpa," he means "I raise."

Pumped Up


Having lots of playing capital, presumably as a result of a winning streak.

Punch


Mark the fronts of cards with a pin, thumbtack, ring, etc., in such a way that the thief making such marks can later tell by feel the ranks of the cards. Such marks are applied to the surface of cards and do not tear the cards, merely add indentations that can be felt from the back, as opposed to nailing, which puts marks in the edges of cards. Also called punch or blister. This is the opposite of prick, in which the thief marks the backs of cards.

Punching


Mark the fronts of cards with a pin, thumbtack, ring, etc., in such a way that the thief making such marks can later tell by feel the ranks of the cards. Such marks are applied to the surface of cards and do not tear the cards, merely add indentations that can be felt from the back, as opposed to nailing, which puts marks in the edges of cards. Also called punch or blister. This is the opposite of prick, in which the thief marks the backs of cards.

Puppy Feet


A cutesy name for clubs (the suit), so called because they (sort of) look like dogs' footprints.

Puppy Foot


1) The ace of clubs. 2) Less commonly, any club.

Pure Nuts


The nuts; that is, an unbeatable hand; usually preceded by the.

Purple


Part of the phrase all purple, that is, having a spade or club flush.

Push


1) In certain forms of stud played in private games, such as keep it or shove it, pass an offered card to the left. 2) Bet too often or too much; play too aggressively. "The time to get Fat Freddy is when he's pushing." 3) Split a pot. 4) A split pot. If two (lowball) players have wheels, that constitutes a push. 5) A form of stud, such as keep it or shove it, played in private games in which players can pass offered cards to the left. 6) The next house dealer to come to a table, or the present dealer's relief. "Where's your push, dealer? I never win when you're behind the box."

Push Bets


Make an agreement, between two or more players, to pay the others when one wins a pot, except that players involved in such an agreement return all of what the others have invested in the pot.

Push the Pot.


I win.

Pushka


A pushka is an arrangement between two or more players to share part of the pots they win, or more precisely, the container into which the shared chips are placed. Typically pushka partners will place as much as $10 from each pot won into a container, and split the container's contents later. I've only heard this term in Maryland, although apparently it's due to the Polish word for box, via Yiddish. Of course removing chips from the table is illegal in table stakes games.

Put


Divine, or attempt to, someone's holdings; often part of the phrase put someone on a hand.

Put a Play on


Outmaneuver someone by the timing or size (or both) of a bet.

Put Air into


Hold your cards in such a way that others can see them. Also, leak air. .

Put Down


Fold.

Put Him on


To guess an opponent's hand and play accordingly.

Put on


To put someone on a hand (or on a draw) is to guess what they are holding.

Put on a Sizz


Sizz ( A rush (Several winning hands in a short period of time.); usually part of the phrase putting on a sizz.).

Put Someone in a Game


Stake (Give someone chips to play on, that is, back that player. ) someone.

Put Someone on a Hand


Divine, or attempt to, someone's holdings.

Put Someone on his Own


After the house has gone cow with someone, the house may split him out (When a player quits who went cow (that is, with whom the house or another player went half and half on the buy-in) or who was staked, if he won, he splits out (splits those winnings with the house or the person who was his partner). Also cut out. ) and put him on his own, that is, playing his own chips.

Put the Bite on


Attempt to borrow money from. "Can you believe it? Smiley put the bite on me for $100."

Put the Clock on


Request the management (as often represented by the house dealer) to start a stopwatch on someone who is taking too long on his turn to make a decision, at which point the deliberating player has one minute to act, and, at the expiration of the minute, if he has not put any money in the pot, is considered to have passed. This situation applies mainly only to high-stakes no-limit or pot-limit games.

Put Up


Put the proper amount of money (or money as represented by chips) into a pot.

Put Up a Deck


Stack a deck (Stacked Deck: A deck that has been arranged to give one player a huge advantage.).

Puta


Queen (the card; it means whore).

Putting on a Sizz


Sizz (A rush (Several winning hands in a short period of time.); usually part of the phrase putting on a sizz.).

Putting on the Heat


Pressuring your opponents with aggressive betting strategies to get the most value from your hand.

Q


Abbreviation for a queen, usually found only in written text about cards.

Quackers


Deuces. (Deuces are sometimes called ducks, as in Dewey Duck.)

Quad


Four of a kind.

Quadruplets


Four of a kind.

Quads


Four of a kind.

Qualifier


A minimum standard that a hand must meet in order to win. Usually applied to the lowball side of a high-low split pot.

Qualifiers


1) Openers (Minimum opening requirements in a particular game. In California draw (limit), for example, a pair of jacks is openers. "Who's got openers?" means "Can anyone open the pot?", that is, does anyone have a pair of jacks or better?). 2) In a high-low split game, particular holding (or better) that a player must have to win the low half or high half of a pot, as, for example, 8-or-better.

Quart


Four cards in sequence of the same suit, that is, four to a straight flush.

Quarter


1) Twenty-five dollars, often symbolized by a green casino chip. 2) To divide half a pot between two tying hands. In split pot games, a player who "ties" another player for their half of the pot is said to be "quartered".

Quarter Check


Twenty-five dollars, often symbolized by a green casino chip.

Quarter Chip


Twenty-five dollars, often symbolized by a green casino chip.

Quarter Game


1) A small home poker game, in which the stakes generally are nickels, dimes, and quarters. Also, nickel-dime-quarter game. 2) Any small-stakes game.

Quartered


Winning one-fourth of a pot, usually due to splitting the low half of the pot in a high-low split game.

Queen


A face card, the one that ranks between the jack and the king.

Queen High


1) In high poker, a no pair hand whose highest card is a queen. "I have a queen high; can you beat that?" "Yeah, I got king high." 2) In low poker, a hand topped by a queen.

Queen-High


Pertaining to a straight or flush topped by a queen. "I was drawing to a queen-high flush but all I made was queen high."

Queens Full


A full house consisting of three queens and another pair.

Queens Over


1) A full house consisting of three queens and another pair.2) Two pair, the higher of which are queens.

Queens Up


Two pair, the higher of which are queens.

Queer


Any of several cheating devices, such as a holdout machine.

Quinine


1) In lowball, a 9. 2) In hold 'em, Q-9 as one's first two cards.

Quint


Straight flush.

Quint Major


Royal flush.

Quit


Cash in your chips and leave a game.

Quitting Time


In a home game, the prearranged time at which the game is supposed to end. (This is often violated when the losers insist on playing "just one more round" or "just another hour" in a usually-vain attempt to recoup their losses, and the winners sometimes accommodate them, knowing the losers will likely lose even more

Quorum


The minimum number of players, usually six, required to start a poker game.

R.O.E


A game or tournament format in which three forms of poker are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each. The games are razz, Omaha/8, and seven-card stud high-low.

Rabbit


1) A weak player. 2) Short for after the rabbit or follow the rabbit. A form of draw, usually lowball, in which a player gets a bonus from the other players for winning two pots in a row.

Rabbithunt


After the deal is over, search through the un-dealt cards to see what you would have made if you had stayed in the pot. Not permitted in most establishments, and frowned on in the rest.

Rabbithunting


After the deal is over, search through the un-dealt cards to see what you would have made if you had stayed in the pot. Not permitted in most establishments, and frowned on in the rest.

Race


In tournaments it is sometimes convenient to remove all lower- denomination chips from play, as the remaining players' stacks tend to grow. Small chips are converted to larger chips and any odd chips are "raced off" in the following way: each player with odd chips places them in front of his stack and is dealt one card for each chip. Highest card (rank and suit) takes all the small chips and converts them to higher-denomination chips

Race for the Odd Chips


In tournaments it is convenient to remove all lower- denomination chips from play, as the remaining players' stacks tend to grow. Small chips are converted to larger chips and any odd chips are "raced off" in the following way: each player with odd chips places them in front of his stack and is dealt one card for each chip. Highest card (rank and suit) takes all the small chips and converts them to higher-denomination chips

Race Off


The process of eliminating the smaller denomination chips during a tournament when they are no longer needed. Also see "Race for the Odd Chips"

Raced Out


Dumped out of a tournament due to having lost one's remaining small denomination chips during a race.

Racehorse


Blind Stud. A home game, also called Mike or racehorse, played as five-, six-, or seven-card stud, with the exception that all cards are dealt face down.

Rachel


The queen of diamonds. Probably comes from the Bible

Rack


1) A plastic tray which holds 100 chips in 5 stacks of 20. 2) 100 chips. "I'm stuck three racks." 3) Place chips in a rack. 4) Win; usually followed by up. "He's been racking up the game" means he's been winning a lot. Comes from meaning 3.

Rag


A card, usually a low card, that, when it appears, has no apparent impact on the hand. A flop of 7 4 2 is a rag flop - few playable hands match the flop well. If the table shows QJT9, all of spades, a 2h on the river is a rag.

Rag Off


To get a card on the river that doesn't help you.

Ragged


A flop (or board) that doesn't appear to help anybody very much. A flop that came down Jd-6h-2c would look ragged.

Ragged Flop


Flop cards that are of no use to any player's hand.

Rags


Worthless cards; blanks.

Rail


A barrier dividing the card playing area from a public area.

Railbird


Someone watching a game from the rail, often used to describe a broke ex-player.

Railroad Hand


1) The two pair hand jacks and 6s. (Say it rhythmically with this emphasis: jacks and sixes, jacks and sixes, jacks and sixes. Sounds a bit like a train, doesn't it?) 2) In hold 'em, J-6 as one's first two cards.

Rainbow


Three or four cards of different suits, for example on a flop. (Two cards of different suits are unsuited and five is impossible.)

Rainbow Hand


A hand containing cards from each of the four suits.

Raise


Placing a higher wager into the pot. All other players must call that bet--or raise it--in order to remain in the game.

Raise Back


Re-raise.

Raise Blind


Raise without having seen your cards.

Raise Out


Drive someone out of a pot by betting more than he is willing to call. In a no-limit lowball game you might hear, "I had a bicycle with the joker to draw to, but he raised me out when he put his whole stack in."

Raised Pot


A pot in which there has been a raise.

Raiser


One who raises.

Raisin Bread.


I'm raising.

Rake


Money taken from each pot and given to the house in return for hosting the game. Usually a percentage of the pot (5%-10%) up to some maximum amount.

Rake Game


A game in which the house makes its money by raking, as opposed to taking time. Sometimes called snatch game

Rakeoff Game


A game in which the house makes its money by raking, as opposed to taking time. Sometimes called snatch game

Rakes


Cards trimmed or shaved slightly so that they can be detected by feel.

Ram and Jam


Bet and raise frequently and aggressively.

Rammer-Jammer


Fast-action player, one who bets and raises frequently and aggressively.

Ramming and Jamming


Betting and raising frequently and aggressively; describing a lively game. "You oughta get in the 3-6; they're rammin' and jammin'."

Ranch


All one's chips; usually preceded by bet the. When a player goes all in, someone may say, "He's betting the ranch." Also, the farm.

Rangdoodles


1) In private or home games, a hand or round in which the stakes are temporarily increased, usually after a "big" hand is shown down.

Rank


The numerical value of a card (as opposed to its suit). Example: "jack," "seven."

Rank Card


Card with numbers, that is, 2 through 10.

Rank of Cards


The hierarchy of cards, from high to low, or low to high, to determine what beats what, as (from high to low) A (ace), K (king), Q (queen), J (jack), T (10), 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, trey (3), deuce (2). In ace-to-five lowball (and many high-low split games), the list goes, from low to high, A, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, J, Q, K.

Rank of Hands


The hierarchy of cards, from high to low, or low to high, to determine what beats what, as (from high to low) A (ace), K (king), Q (queen), J (jack), T (10), 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, trey (3), deuce (2). In ace-to-five lowball (and many high-low split games), the list goes, from low to high, A, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, J, Q, K.

Rap


1) In draw poker, at the time to draw cards, indicate that one is pat. So called because a player, if he has a pat hand, often raps on the table with his knuckles when it is his turn to announce his draw. 2) In any form of poker, at the time for making a bet, indicate that one declines to bet; check. 3) In a game in which gypsy bets are permitted, when it is the blind's turn to act, decline to raise, indicated by rapping on the table with one's cards or knuckles. 4) In a game in which a player must post a blind to get a hand earlier than waiting for the blind to come around (which blind then acts as the player's opening bet), when it is that player's legal turn to act, decline to raise, indicated in similar fashion. 5) When one is offered the deck by the dealer, after shuffling, to cut, rap on the deck to indicate one is declining the option of cutting the cards. For definitions 1 and 2, also knuckle or knock. For 5, sometimes, tap. 6) Standing pat. "He gave it the rap" means he stood pat.

Rap Pat


1) Stand pat, that is, at the point when one is supposed to draw, tap the table with one's cards or rap on the table with one's knuckles as an indication that one will not draw any cards. 2) Extended figuratively, draw no cards (but without necessarily actually performing the act of tapping the table with one's cards or rapping with one's knuckles). "How many cards did John take, dealer?" "He rapped pat."

Raquel Welch


In hold 'em, 3-8 as one's first two cards. Has something to do with certain measurements

Rathole


During a playing session, surreptitiously remove chips from play. This is not strictly cheating, just not fair to the other players who do not have an opportunity to win as much as they might otherwise. It is not permitted in public card rooms to remove chips from the table without cashing out. Players rat hole chips because they don't want to chance losing them back, or because they want to hide their winnings from someone who has staked them or someone they owe money to.

Ratholer


One who ratholes chips.

Razz


Seven-card stud lowball.

Reach for One's Chips


Make a move toward one's chips, presumably with the intention of betting. Usually said by someone about another betting in a situation in which the first has no intention of calling.

Read


In a stud game, make a conclusion about another player's holdings based on that player's exposed cards, or, in any game, make such a conclusion based on the player's actions, remarks, betting patterns, etc.

Read Someone's Mail


Divine that someone is bluffing. After being caught bluffing, someone might say, "You've been reading my mail."

Reader


1) Marked cards, particularly those marked with special luminous ink that can be seen only by someone wearing special glasses or contact lenses sensitive to a particular portion of the spectrum. Also known as luminous readers. 2) Pink eye (Infrared (pink- or red-tinted) contact lenses worn by a thief to see the markings on luminous readers, cards marked with special luminous ink that can be seen only in infrared light.)

Readers


1) Marked cards, particularly those marked with special luminous ink that can be seen only by someone wearing special glasses or contact lenses sensitive to a particular portion of the spectrum. Also known as luminous readers. 2) Pink eye (Infrared (pink- or red-tinted) contact lenses worn by a thief to see the markings on luminous readers, cards marked with special luminous ink that can be seen only in infrared light.)

Ready Up


Prepare for a cheating move.

Re-Buy


To purchase additional chips after an initial buy-in, usually after losing most or all of the previous buy-in.

Re-Buy Tournament


A tournament in which players are permitted to re-buy, as opposed to a freeze-out tournament.

Red


Red is the most common color for $5 chips. If someone bets a stack of red, it means they're betting a bunch of $5 chips, probably 20 of them.

Red Dog


An old card game whose name has been usurped as another name for acey-deucey.

Redeal


1) Deal again, usually as occasioned by a misdeal. 2) The situation in which the cards must be dealt. "Do I owe an ante?" "No, it's a re-deal."

Redraw


A draw to an even better hand when you currently are holding the nuts.

Reentry Blind


A blind that a player in a traveling blind game puts in to get a hand after missing the blinds in a game in which players must come in on the blind.

Reflector


A cheating device, a mirror or other shiny object, such as a highly-polished cigaret lighter, placed apparently innocently on the table, used to read the reflected faces of the cards while they are being dealt. Also, gaper, glimmer, shiner

Refrigerator


Where a cold deck (supposedly) comes from. "He brought one out from the refrigerator" means he brought in a cooler (cold deck).

Regular


Habitual player in a home game, or frequent player in a particular card room.

Release


Fold a hand, usually implying a good hand when you think it is beat.

Rembrandt


1) A form of draw poker, found only in home games, in which all face cards are wild. 2) Face card; so called because a face card is sometimes called a paint. This usage is usually restricted to lowball.

Repeat


Bet the same amount as on the preceding round of betting.

Replacement


1) Twist. 2) In a draw game, a card substituted for a card in one's hand, that is, the draw card. "Dealer, I need a replacement."

Represent


Implying, by one's betting style, that one has a particular hand

Reputation


The regard other players have of your ability to play.

Re-Raise


Any raise after the first raise in a round. Player A bets, player B raises, player C (or A) re-raises. See also cap and check-raise.

Reraise Blind


1) The term usually applies to a draw game, generally lowball, and is often shortened to OBRBRB. A game in which the first player to the dealer's left blinds the pot, the next player raises blind before getting his cards, and the next player raises before getting his cards. Since this puts six bets into the pot before the cards are dealt, the effect is to increase the action of the game. Often shortened to re-raise, and sometimes called raise blind. 2) This is usually part of a proposition. A player who asks another, "open blind, raise blind, re-raise blind?" is saying, "I will open the pot blind and re-raise you back blind if you promise to raise blind."

Rest Farm


Where a player has to go after suffering a heavy loss.

Re-Straddle


Over blind. In a traveling blind game with four blinds, the re-straddle is put in by the player three positions to the left of the dealer.

Return


The long-run advantage of a given situation, specifically without reference to any particular outcome. I.e., what you figure to win or lose on average after a large number of repetitions of the same situation.

Reverse Bridge Order


Reverse suit order according to the game of bridge, that is, clubs, diamonds, hearts, spades. Reverse bridge order comes into play when breaking a tie for low card in determining who has the low-card forced bet in seven-card stud, or who starts the deal on the first hand at a lowball or razz table

Reverse Implied Odds


The ratio of the amount of money now in the pot to the amount of money you will have to call to continue from the present round to the end of the hand.

Reverse Tell


A tell, that means the opposite of what one might expect. A common tell is acting weak when holding a strong hand; a reverse tell might be acting strong when holding a strong hand.

Ribbon Clerk


1) Shoe clerk. "Let's raise and get the ribbon clerks out." 2) A small-stakes gambler.

Rich


1) Pertaining to a packet (portion of a deck) containing an overabundance of high cards, 10s and up. 2) When part of the phrase too rich for my blood, pertaining to a bet, expensive. The player who says this generally means, "I fold."

Rickey De Laet


A variant of Mexican stud in which the rank of each player's hole card is wild for that player. The game probably gets its name because a player's wild card can change each round, along with the composition of the hand. The game is also called Rickey de Laet.

Ride


To stay in a hand without being forced to bet.

Ride Along


Get a free ride (To stay in a hand without being forced to bet.).

Rider Back


A brand of playing cards that feature a bicycle rider on the back of the cards. Often used in home games.

Riffle


1) To shuffle. 2) To fidget with your chips.

Riffle Cull


A method of stacking the deck by culling (selecting and pulling out) a few cards from the deck, arranging them in a desired sequence, and then keeping that sequence intact using a cheating riffle shuffle.

Riffle Shuffle


A particular kind of shuffle, performed with the deck separated into two approximately equal packets, whose corners touch, the thumbs against the edges closest to the dealer, and then lifted against the edges, which separates the cards enough for them to interlace. This is how professional dealers shuffle; amateurs may use an overhand shuffle

Riffle Stack


A method of stacking the deck using a riffle shuffle.

Rig


1) Any cheating method. 2) A cheating device, such as a holdout machine or a gaffed roulette wheel. 3) Prearrange the outcome of an event upon which people bet, such as stack a deck.

Right Joint


An honest gambling establishment, particularly one in which thieves are not tolerated; the opposite of a flat shop.

Right Price


Exactly the correct pot odds.

Right Spot


Good situation. "Been losing all day till I got into this game. Looks like I finally found the right spot."

Right to Bet


A situation that pertains only in private or home games in which each player has the right to make at least one bet or raise per round no matter how many raises there have been during that round.

Ring Game


A standard game where players can come and go as they choose.

Ring in


To substitute a prearranged deck for the one that is supposed to be dealt.

Ring in a Cold Deck


To substitute a prearranged deck for the one that is supposed to be dealt.

Ring in a Deck


To substitute a prearranged deck for the one that is supposed to be dealt.

Ringer


A player who purports to be a beginner, but in actuality is an expert. Such a player is sometimes brought into an established private game by one of the regulars for the purpose of taking off some of the money, which the ringer will later split with the regular.

Ripped


Pertaining to a deck that was cut, then (dishonestly) replaced in the same order.

River


The last card dealt in a hand of stud or Hold'em.

River Card


1) The seventh card in seven-card stud; seventh street. 2) The fifth community card in hold 'em; fifth street

River Gambler


Originally a gambler who plied his trade on steamboats up and down the Mississippi and its tributaries, usually playing poker and often cheating, and later extended to mean any card thief.

River Gambling


Gambling that took place on steamboats up and down the Mississippi and its tributaries, in the mid-1800s, usually at poker and faro, and often involving cheating.

Riverboat Gambler


Originally a gambler who plied his trade on steamboats up and down the Mississippi and its tributaries, usually playing poker and often cheating, and later extended to mean any card thief.

Rizlo


In high poker, 2-4-6-8-10 of assorted suits. This is a random "garbage hand" having no value.

Robin Hood Cheat


A thief who cheats for one or more other players, with no benefit to himself, sometimes robbing other thieves and returning their ill-gotten gains to the victims, but sometimes for the purpose of taking attention away from himself.

Rock


A player who plays an extremely tight, patient game is a rock.

Rock Crusher


The nuts (Best hand); usually preceded by a.

Rock Garden


Describing a game full of rocks, that is, a tight game with little action. "Don't bother with the 20-40; it's all rocked up" means don't get into that game because it's very tight and no one is giving any money away.

Rocked Up


Describing a game full of rocks, that is, a tight game with little action. "Don't bother with the 20-40; it's all rocked up" means don't get into that game because it's very tight and no one is giving any money away.

Rocket


Ace; usually used in the plural. Often part of the phrase pocket rockets.

Rockets


A pair of aces in the hole.

Rocky


Tight. "Boy is this a rocky game!" "Watch out for Old Mike; he's the rockiest player in the joint."

Rocky.


Name for a tight player.

Roll


1) Short for bankroll. 2) To turn a card face-up.

Roll the Deck


Slip discards on top of the pack, a cheating move.

Roll your Own


Expose one's cards in the manner described under roll-your-own.

Rolled Up


In Seven-Card Stud, three of a kind on third street (the first three cards).

Roll-your-Own


Any of various stud games (such as Anaconda), in which players turn their face-down cards up, one at a time, after having prearranged them in the manner in which they wish the cards to appear, generally with a betting round following each exposure.

Roodles


In private or home games, a hand or round in which the stakes are temporarily increased, usually after a "big" hand is shown down.

Roodles Hand


The showdown hand that occasions a round or hand of roodles.

Rotating Bet


A betting scheme in which each round of betting starts with the next player clockwise. Typically, the player to the left of the dealer starts the first betting round, the player to his left starts the second round, and so on.

Rotation


The clockwise progression of betting, or of successive deals.

Rotation Game


A game or tournament format in which several different games are played in rotation, usually either half an hour of each or one round of each.

Rouge


Substance used for marking the backs of cards.

Rough


A hand of a particular type that will not beat many other hands of that type. Often used in low games to indicate non-nut low hands with a particular high card. A rough 8 in ace to five lowball could be any eight high hand other than 8432A, although 8532A isn't too rough. Rough is the opposite of smooth.

Rough it Up


Change the tempo or temperament of a game by increasing the stakes beyond what are customary.

Round


The period during which each active player has the right to check, bet or raise. It ends when the last bet or raise has been called by all players still in the hand. A round can refer either to a round of betting or a round of hands.

Round of ...


In a draw poker game, one round of a particular opening requirement, as a round of jacks, one round in which jacks or better is dealt. A round of queens, would be one round of queens or better, and so on.

Round of Betting


1) One opportunity to bet from each active player. If there are no raises, there is only one round of betting. If there are raises, there is more than one round of betting. 2) One sequence of equalization of bets, that is, the period in which all bets and raises are accounted for; the point from the start of betting until all players have put the same amount into the pot (with the exception of anyone going all in, running out of chips before completing the betting). In draw games, there are two rounds (unless everyone but one bettor folds for a bet on the first round) of betting: one before the draw, and one after. In stud games, there is usually one betting round after the dealing of each up-card, plus a final round on the last card. Sometimes shortened to round.

Round Table Game


Any game, particularly poker, in which gamblers wager among themselves (as opposed to betting against the house or any other banker).

Rounder


A professional player who "makes the rounds" of the big poker games in the country.

Rounding


Performing a cheating maneuver consisting of marking the back of a card with a fingernail or by bending a corner. Also known as denting.

Rounds


A deck of cards marked on their backs, for easy detection, by feel, by a cheater.

Routine


Straight flush.

Royal


Royal flush. "I've got a royal."

Royal Brass Brazilians


The nuts; usually preceded by the. This hand is considered by some to be slightly better than the Royal Brazilians or the Brass Brazilians.

Royal Brazilians


The nuts; usually preceded by the

Royal Flush


The best possible poker hand, consisting of the 10 through the Ace, all the same suit.

Royal Six


In lowball, a 6-4.

Royal Straight Flush


An ace high straight flush is a royal straight flush, or a royal flush, or just a royal. Some traditionalists dislike the phrase "royal flush" (preferring "ace high straight flush"), but no one dislikes the hand. It's the most powerful hand in casino poker.

Royalties


A bonus or royalty paid by all players to the holder of a particular hand, or a very high hand.

Royalty


A bonus or royalty paid by all players to the holder of a particular hand, or a very high hand.

Rug Joint


A well-appointed casino or card room, as opposed to a sawdust joint.

Rule Book


The written regulations (poker rules) of a particular card room on the conduct of a poker game. Poker rules are not standard, although most rule books contain many similar rules. Some rules, such as what hand beats what, are fairly standard, particularly in public card rooms, while others, such as what constitutes a legitimate bet or raise and the manner in which betting must be made, vary widely. The smart player familiarizes herself with the rule book of a particular establishment before first sitting down to play.

Rules of Poker


Regulations on the conduct of a poker game, such as what hand beats what, the manner in which bets are made, how each permitted game is played, and so on. Also known as the laws of poker. Compare with poker rules, which are the rules specific to a given card room, club, or casino

Rumble


Catch a thief in the act of manipulating the cards.

Run


A straight, or a series of good cards.

Run `em.


"Deal the cards." When the action in any but the last round gets to the player in last position, he might say this when choosing not to bet.

Run a Pot


Make a planned bluff, usually one involving bets in several rounds.

Run in


While shuffling, maintain the original order of the cards; that is, perform a false shuffle.

Run One


Attempt a bluff. "I tried to run one, but the tightest player at the table got lucky and showed me the Royal Brass Brazilians

Run Over


Playing aggressively in an attempt to control the other players.

Run Over the Game


Bet aggressively, intimidating the other players.

Run Through


Double a small stack by beating someone with a large stack; sometimes part of the phrase run a stack through. "Big John had $10,000 in front of him, and he was stuck about twice that much. Sally came in with $100, ran it through him three times, and then took the $800 to the window."

Run Up a Hand


Perform a cheating maneuver in which one selects cards from the discards, and arranges these prior to some form of false shuffling such that they will be distributed where the thief wants them to go (usually with one good hand, sometimes more, the best of which will go to the dealer or his confederate).

Runner


Typically said "runner-runner" to describe a hand which was made only by catching the correct cards on both the turn and the river - "He made a runner-runner flush to beat my trips."

Runner-Runner


A hand made on the last two cards. A player holding 55, with a board of AA455, in that order, makes runner-runner quads.

Running


Two needed cards that come as the last two cards dealt.

Running Bad


On a losing streak.

Running Good


On a winning streak.

Running Pair


In hold 'em or seven-card stud, a pair made by the appearance of two matching cards in a row that do not match any already on the board.

Runt


A no-pair hand of mixed suits.

Rush


Several winning hands in a short period of time. Some players feel superstitiously that a rush is an independent entity, and will "play their rush" or "bet their rush" after winning a few pots - play looser and more aggressively, or just be certain to play out each hand until the rush ends.

S & M


Sklansky & Malmuth. Generally refers to the ideas and algorithms published by these two authors. When used in a 7-card stud context, often refers to '7 Card Stud For Advanced Players', and when used in a Hold'em context, often refers to 'Texas Hold 'em For Advanced Players'.

Saddle


Bend cards in such a way that the deck will be cut one card above one of these cards.

Sail for


Lose. "How much did he sail for?"

Sailboats


Two or more 4s. (That's what they look like.)

Salmon


7 (the card, or the lowball hand).

Salt Away


During a playing session, surreptitiously remove chips from play. This is not strictly cheating, just not fair to the other players who do not have an opportunity to win as much as they might otherwise. It is not permitted in public card rooms to remove chips from the table without cashing out. Players rat hole chips because they don't want to chance losing them back, or because they want to hide their winnings from someone who has staked them or someone they owe money to.

Saltiness


Poor luck; the condition of being salty.

Salty


Having poor luck; on a losing streak. "How ya doin'?" "Been running salty lately; can't seem to make a hand when it counts."

Sand


Use sandpaper on the sides of some cards so that their ranks can be determined by feel, or so that they can be easily located within a full deck; a method of shaving the cards.

Sandbag


Playing a strong hand as if it were only a fair one.

Sandbagger


One who sandbags, often a term of disapproval.

Sandpaper


Cards marked on their sides by sanding.

Sandwich


To raise before, and after, a caller who gets caught in the middle.

Santa Barbara


In hold 'em, A-K as one's first two cards. Derives from a destructive oil spill off the Santa Barbara coast, the name arising from the more well-known name for the hand, big slick.

Satellite


A small-stakes tournament whose winner obtains cheap entry into a bigger tournament.

Satellite Tournament


A special tournament whose prize is usually a buy-in for a larger tournament. One-table satellites usually have just one winner; sometimes second place is awarded a free entry to another tournament. In larger satellite tournaments, the winner may get entry to the larger tournament, round-trip airfare plus accommodations (if the satellite takes place in a city other than that of the larger tournament), plus some percentage of the excess cash accumulated in buy-ins and re-buys. Second, third, and sometimes other places also can win a percentage of this cash. A satellite tournament with a large number of entrants, awarding entry or entries to major tournaments, is called a super satellite.

Sauter La Coupe


A cheating maneuver in which the dealer palms a card and moves it to the bottom of the deck, there to be dealt at his discretion.

Savannah


7 (the card, or the lowball hand).

Save


1) Make an agreement, between two or more players, to pay the others when one wins a pot.

Save Bets


Make an agreement, between two or more players, to pay the others when one wins a pot, except that players involved in such an agreement return all of what the others have invested in the pot.

Sawbuck


$10 or a $10 bill.

Sawdust Joint


1) A card room or casino that caters to a low-class crowd, sometimes implying a place whose denizens include thieves. Comes from a time when taverns had hardwood floors and sawdust sprinkled on the floor to absorb spilled drinks. 2) Any gambling house of less-than-opulent surroundings, as opposed to a carpet joint.

Sawski


$10 or a $10 bill.

Sax


6 (the card, or the lowball hand).

Say


Announce in turn whether one is betting or passing.

Sb


Shorthand, particularly in e-mail and Internet postings, for small blind.

Scam


1) A cheating agreement between two or more players; collusion. 2) Less frequently, any marginally dishonest scheme.

Scammer


One who scams.

Scare Card


1) A card that when it appears makes a better hand more likely. 2) In hold'em, a third suited card on the river is a scare card, because it makes a flush possible. If you're pretty sure your opponent paired a king on the flop, an ace on the turn is a scare card. Scare cards will often make it difficult for the best hand to bet, and offer an opportunity for bluffing. Obviously such cards are scarier in pot-limit or no-limit games.

Scared Money


Money a player is afraid to lose (and thus probably will). There's a card room saying, "Scared money never wins."

Scarne Cut


A form of cut in which the cutter holds the cards in one hand, removes the bottom half with the other and places them atop the remaining half, pulls a packet from the center and places those cards on top of the remaining cards. This cut is named after John Scarne, who lectured and wrote about gambling thieves, and introduced this form of cut as a means of foiling cheaters who had stacked the deck. The Scarne cut is not permitted in most public card rooms, where the deck must not be lifted from the table and must be cut with one hand. Sometimes called whorehouse cut.

Schmengie


Put a bad beat on someone.

School


The players in a regular game.

Scoop


1) Declare both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare. 2) Win both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare. (Just because you declare both ways does not necessarily mean you'll win both ways.) 3) Win all of the pot in a high-low poker game that does not have a declare by having both the highest and the lowest hand. 4) Win all of the pot in a high-low poker game that does not have a declare by having the best hand for one way and no one has qualifiers for the other way.

Scoop Hand


A hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot, or the whole pot due to having the best hand for high when there is no low.

Scoop the Kitty


Win all the money the players have put up during a poker session.

Scoop the Pool


Win all the money the players have put up during a poker session.

Scooper


1) A hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot. 2) The player holding the hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot. 3) The player who declares both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare.

Scooping Hand


A hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot, or the whole pot due to having the best hand for high when there is no low.

Scoot


Pass chips between players, considered against the rules in some clubs.

Scoot Partner


Someone with whom one player saves antes (or chips of the normal denomination for the game), as described under save and save bets.

Scootermockins


Dollars.

Scooting


Passing chips to another player after winning a pot.

Score


1) The Win. "He made a good score." 2) To Win. "I scored last night." 3) Win big. 4) Win by cheating.

Score a Big Touch


Win big, usually dishonestly.

Scored Pair


Having a pair in the pocket in hold 'em or seven-card stud, that is, a pair as one's starting (first two) cards.

Scotch Straight


In high draw poker, a special skip straight, a nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, five even cards in a series separated each from the other by one rank, that is, 2-4-6-8-10. The same hand, but with no value, is called a rizlo.

Scourge of Scotland


The 9 of diamonds, so called because every ninth Scottish king was (supposedly) a tyrant, and diamonds were a symbol of Scotland. Also called Curse of Scotland.

Scramble


Thoroughly mix the deck while it is face-down on the table by spreading the cards over a large area, a move sometimes made by a dealer prior to actually shuffling the cards in traditional fashion. Sometimes this extra time taken mixing the cards is done at the request of a player. Some say that the legendary Johnny Moss, three-time winner of the World Series of Poker, originated the term scramble. Also called wash.

Scratch Paper


Cards marked on their backs with sandpaper or a sharp instrument.

Screen Out


Make a diversion, to draw attention away from a thief who is in the process of performing a cheating maneuver. Also called shade.

Screen-Out


A diversion made (by another player) to draw attention away from a thief who is in the process of performing a cheating maneuver.

Screwed Down


Playing very tight.

Screwy Louie


A form of seven stud in which cards are passed to left and right, sometimes multiple times, and sometimes with five cards chosen at the end and rolled, that is, exposed one at a time. Also called pass the trash, Anaconda.

Seat


1) A chair at a poker table, or, more particularly, the player in that chair, or the seating position of that player. A house dealer might say to an approaching cocktail waitress, "Seat 1 wants a drink." 2) An opening in a poker game, particularly as it just becomes available for a new player. A dealer may announce to the floorman, "Seat open on 3." Someone who has not yet sat down to play may ask the board man, "Do you have a seat in 10-20 hold 'em?"

Seat Charge


In public card rooms, an hourly fee for playing poker.

Seat Position


The actual seat a player has, normally numbered sequentially starting with 1 as the first seat to dealer's left. Not to be confused with position in a particular pot. Typically unrelated to play of a hand but often important in peripheral aspects, e.g.: "Seats 1 and 10 are nonsmoking here", "Seat 5 has a good view of the table", "Seat 3 is in a high-traffic area".

Seated


1) Playing (in a game). 2) Pertaining to a player in a game (as opposed to someone who is either not yet playing, or who is away from the table). In describing the disposition of a jackpot, you may see the wording, "When a jackpot is won, 50% goes to the holder of the losing hand, 25% to the holder of the winning hand, and the remaining 25% to seated players

Seating List


In most card rooms, if there is no seat available for you when you arrive, you can put your name on a list to be seated when a seat opens up. Typically, games are listed across the top of a board, and names are written below each game so that players are seated for games in the order in which they arrive.

Seat-Man


1) A professional dealer.

Second


The second card off the deck, when referring to being dealt by a cheating dealer; often plural. "He dealt himself a second." "They barred him for dealing seconds."

Second Best


Holding a hand that comes in second on the showdown (that is, loses). "Here I am, second best again."

Second Button


A pair with the second highest card on the flop. If you have As-Ts, and the flop comes Kd-Th-6c, you have flopped second pair.

Second Dealer


A mechanic (card manipulator) whose specialty is dealing the second card from the top. The reason for such a move is to hold back the top card, which he knows because he has peeked it, until he can deal it to himself, to a confederate, or to someone he is trying to cheat.

Second Dealing


Perform a cheating maneuver in which a card manipulator deals cards not from the top of the deck, but from directly beneath the top card.

Second Hand


The second player to act in any betting round.

Second Nuts


In hold 'em, having the second-best possible hand for the situation, or, the actual second-best hand in such a situation.

Second Pair


A pair with the second highest card on the flop. If you have As-Ts, and the flop comes Kd-Th-6c, you have flopped second pair.

Second Position


1) The player two positions to the left of the dealer. 2) The seat position of that player.

Second Story


A raise, usually while holding a good hand; so called because, if it is called, and the player wins, it doubles the size of his stack.

Seconds


The dealing of one or more cards from the next-to-the-top position of the deck.

Seconds Dealer


A mechanic (card manipulator) whose specialty is dealing the second card from the top. The reason for such a move is to hold back the top card, which he knows because he has peeked it, until he can deal it to himself, to a confederate, or to someone he is trying to cheat. Sometimes second dealer. Also called deuce dealer, number two man.

Second-Story Man


A mechanic (card manipulator) whose specialty is dealing the second card from the top. The reason for such a move is to hold back the top card, which he knows because he has peeked it, until he can deal it to himself, to a confederate, or to someone he is trying to cheat. Sometimes second dealer. Also called deuce dealer, number two man.

See


To call, as in: "I'll see you" or "I'll see that bet".

See a Bet


To call, as in: "I'll see you" or "I'll see that bet".

Seed


1) An ace. Also called bullet (and several other names). 2) A $1 chip. Also called bone.

Sell


As in "sell a hand". In a spread limit game, this means to bet less than the maximum when you have a very strong hand, hoping players will call whereas they would not have called a maximum bet.

Sell a Hand


In a spread limit game, this means to bet less than the maximum when you have a very strong hand, hoping players will call whereas they would not have called a maximum bet.

Semi-Bluff


A semi-bluff is similar to a bluff, except that the semi-bluffer has some chance of making a winning hand. The idea behind a semi-bluff is that while neither the bluff nor the draw might be positive expectation, in combination they could be. Betting a weak draw is often only correct as a semi-bluff.

Senate Dealer


A professional dealer, in particular, one who does not participate in the game.

Send


Signal someone's hand, usually by one thief to his confederate; usually followed by the hand. "He sent him the hand" means that he gave his partner a signal that gave away the hand that the former had managed to get a look at.

Send Around


Playing a strong hand as if it were only a fair one.

Send in


In a no-limit game, bet large, particularly when that involves all of one's chips.

Send it Around


Playing a strong hand as if it were only a fair one.

Send it in


In a no-limit game, bet large, particularly when that involves all of one's chips.

Send it.


"Push the pot, losers." Said by an ungracious winner after showing down the best hand, usually in a big pot.

Sequence


A hand consisting of 5 cards in sequence but not in suit.

Sequence Flush


An obsolete term for Straight flush

Sergeant from K Company


A king (the card).

Sergeants from K Company


Two or more kings.

Serious Poker


Serious poker players like to distinguish the game they play from the average weekly penny poker game.

Serve


Deal (cards), particularly when done as a living.

Session


1) With respect to a given player, a period of playing cards, from the point at which the player first sits down to the table until he cashes out (or leaves the table broke). 2) With respect to a group, the period of time for which the game lasts, from the deal of the first hand until it breaks up for lack of players, or due to a prearranged ending time. For both meanings, sometimes called poker session

Set


1) In hold 'em and stud, three of a kind. To flop a set in hold 'em means that (most often) one started with a pair and one of those cards was among the flop (the first three community cards). Less often it means a pair was among the flop and the player had another card of that rank in the hole. 2) Four of a kind, particularly as part of the phrase set of fours. 3) Arrange the two hands that are made out of the seven cards dealt each player in pai gow poker.

Set All in


In a no-limit game, bet all of someone's chips. You can set another player in, or set yourself in. Both uses often include all in. "When he checked, I set him in, and when he called, I got even." "He set me all in."

Set of Fours


Four of a kind

Set Over Set


1) In hold 'em, one player's set (In hold 'em and stud, three of a kind) against another's. 2) In hold 'em, one player's pocket pair (pair in the hole) against another's, in the situation in which the board cards help neither player. If you start with a pair of nines and I have a pair of sevens, and the board comes 10-J-2-3-8, that is a situation of set over set. (In this case, set does not refer to three of a kind.)

Set Someone All in


In a no-limit game, bet all of someone's chips. You can set another player in, or set yourself in. Both uses often include all in. "When he checked, I set him in, and when he called, I got even." "He set me all in."

Set Someone in


In a no-limit game, bet all of someone's chips. You can set another player in, or set yourself in. Both uses often include all in. "When he checked, I set him in, and when he called, I got even." "He set me all in."

Set Up


1) Make a bet or action that causes another player to think you always act that way, so that you can take advantage of the misconception later; set a trap for someone.

Set you in


To bet as much as your opponent has left in front of him.

Settle Up


At the end of a poker session, pay one's losses.

Settlement


The period of time at the end of a poker game (usually private) at which losers pay their losses and winners collect their winnings; cashing in of chips.

Setup


1) A box containing two decks of plastic cards. You sometimes hear players ask for "a new setup." This means they want not just a new deck, but two fresh decks, because in a game that uses plastic cards, often the decks are rotated and not replaced until a set period of time ends, or until requested (or when the cards become damaged). 2) Preparation of a victim for being cheated.

Seven / 8


A poker game, seven-card stud high-low split, with an 8 qualifier for low.

Seven Card Stud


Variation of Poker. One of the poker games most commonly played in public card rooms, seven card stud is probably the most well known. In seven card stud (sometimes "seven stud" or just "stud"), each player is dealt seven cards of their own: two down, then four up, and a final card down. There is a round of betting after the first up card and after each subsequent card dealt.

Seven Deuces Wild


This game is played exactly like Seven Card Stud except that all deuces in the deck are wild.

Seven Rule


In lowball, the rule that states that you must bet a 7 or better (that is, a no-pair hand topped by a 7, 6, or 5) after the draw. In some clubs, failing to bet a 7 costs you the entire pot; in more clubs, it costs you only the action (betting) after the draw. In such a case, if a player passes a 7, and then calls with it, if the player who bet has worse than his hand, that player gets his money back, and the player who passed the 7 wins what was in the pot before the draw; if the player who bet has better than his hand, that player of course wins the whole pot, that is, the bet after the draw along with the remainder of the pot. The purpose of the rule is to speed up the game (by preventing players from passing good hands, and then waiting for the action to get back to them so they can raise

Seven Stud Hi Low


This game plays the same as Seven Card Stud except that the player with the lowest hand gets half the pot. (See Low) This varient is an Ace to 5 low hand, where straights and flushes are not counted in the low hand. This means that a wheel will most likely win the pot. Pairs and trips count against you in the low hand. Thus when evaluating ^AH ^2H ^3D ^3C ^4S ^9S ^JS, we throw the ^3C out leaving you with a 9 low hand. If it is impossible to get 5 cards out of the seven without having a pair then your hand is evaluated as the worst possible poker hand, usually leaving you with a pair or worse.

Seven-Card Flip


A form of seven-card stud, found exclusively in home games, in which each player receives four cards face down, turns any two up, and then the betting commences. Also called you roll two.

Sevens Rule


In lowball, the rule that states that you must bet a 7 or better (that is, a no-pair hand topped by a 7, 6, or 5) after the draw. In some clubs, failing to bet a 7 costs you the entire pot; in more clubs, it costs you only the action (betting) after the draw. In such a case, if a player passes a 7, and then calls with it, if the player who bet has worse than his hand, that player gets his money back, and the player who passed the 7 wins what was in the pot before the draw; if the player who bet has better than his hand, that player of course wins the whole pot, that is, the bet after the draw along with the remainder of the pot. The purpose of the rule is to speed up the game (by preventing players from passing good hands, and then waiting for the action to get back to them so they can raise

Seven-Stud


Seven-card stud.

Seven-Stud / 8


Seven-card stud.

Seventh Street


The final betting round on the last card in Seven-Card Stud.

Seven-Toed Pete


A name for seven-card stud, heard only in home games.

Seven-Twenty-Seven


A stud game (sort of), played only in home games, in which each player is dealt a down card, followed by a round of betting, and then one or more cards face up. Aces have a value of 1 or 11, face cards a value of , and all other cards have face value. This is a split-pot game, with the object being to end up with a total closest to 7 or 27. On each round, players can either receive a further up card, or refuse further cards. After any round in which no player takes a card, the players declare which "way" they are going (7 or 27, sometimes called high or low), and there is a showdown. (Sometimes there is one more round of betting before the showdown.) In some versions, once a player refuses up cards a certain number of times (say, three), that player can no longer request further cards. The purpose of this rule is that when a player is in a "lock" (cannot lose) situation, that is, when he is the only one going low, and there are more than one player going high, and who have quit asking for up cards, the player with the lock can prolong the betting by drawing cards to a point at which he cannot hit without destroying his lock. In some games, being on one side or the other of 7 or 27 (when no one has exactly that total) wins over the other side.

Sex


6 (the card, or the lowball hand). Heard in a card room: He: "Do you like sex?" She: "Sure, sex-four, sex-five..."

Shade


Make a diversion, to draw attention away from a thief who is in the process of performing a cheating maneuver. Also called screen out.

Shade Work


Markings placed on the backs of cards, additions made to the natural design (as additional circles on a clock face or spokes on a bicycle wheel), for the use of cheating players or dealers.

Shade Worker


A card thief who uses shade work.

Shading


Markings (or cosmetics) put on the backs of cards with paint, ink, or some other fluid, so that a thief can read the ranks (and sometimes suits) of the cards from the back; alterations made to the natural design on the backs of the cards.

Shake-Shake


Another name for pai gow poker.

Shark


1) Expert player. 2) Thief. 3) Loan shark.

Sharker


1) Expert player.2) Thief.

Sharp


1) Expert player. 2) Thief. Often, cardsharp.

Sharp Top


A four or an ace. Some lexicographers use the term only for an ace

Shave


Trim the sides of cards, to make them thinner so as to be easily detected by a thief. Also called trim.

Shaved


Pertaining to the situation in which a hand is beaten by one only slightly better. Also called edged, edged out, or topped out.

Shears


1) Cards whose shape or size has been altered by a thief so they can be located by feel during manipulation of the deck. 2) A tool for making such cards.

Shed


In draw poker, discard.

Sheet


The cashier's or floor man's record of stakes and cows, and sometimes transactions against players' banks and tab cards, which, at the end of the shift, is figured in with the determination of the net gain (or loss) for the shift; the balance sheet for the shift. From this comes the expression on the sheet, which means playing stake or cow.

Sheet Player


One who plays for the house, that is, on the sheet.

Shelf


Where a stake player's chips are kept when he is between playing sessions, usually a space under the control of the cashier, often just to one side of the window (to the cage). From this comes the expression on the shelf; the expression is generally used only for a stake player

Shift


1) One of the three traditional working periods in a card room or casino: day, swing, and graveyard. 2) The personnel of a particular shift. "What time does swing shift come on?"

Shift Cards


While dealing, reverse the order of two cards as they are dealt.

Shifting Sands


A variant of Mexican stud in which the rank of each player's hole card is wild for that player. The game probably gets its name because a player's wild card can change each round, along with the composition of the hand. The game is also called Rickey de Laet.

Shill


1) Someone who plays for the house, to help start games or keep short or shaky games going, to keep the live players (that is, those who are not shills) from leaving. A shill is different from a stake, because a shill keeps no part of the winnings, and is usually in the employ of the house or casino. Shills often have to play according to shill rules. Shills are not common in California card rooms, where the function is more likely to be filled by employees helping get a game started, basically just filling seats till more live players come in. Also, game starter, house player, percentage player. An old term for shill is seat-man. 2) Someone who plays like a shill, that is, a no-action player. This is a derisive term used by other players to describe a tight or otherwise conservative player. 3) Act in the role of a shill. "I usually deal for 40 minutes, and then shill till my next down."

Shill Rules


How a card room wants its shills to play.

Shiner


A cheating device, a mirror or other shiny object, such as a highly-polished cigarette lighter, placed apparently innocently on the table, used to read the reflected faces of the cards while they are being dealt. Also, gaper, glimmer, reflector

Shirley


A timid player; always preceded by play like. If someone says to you, "You play like Shirley," he is accusing you of having no gamble.

Shoe Clerk


1) A player who does not stay for a raise (with the implication that he is dropping out of fear) or, particularly in a no-limit game, for any large bet.2) Someone who is not serious about playing a particular pot, and thus will not call a raise.

Shoot an Angle


Use an angle (Any technically legal but ethically dubious way to increase your expectation at a game; a trick.).

Shoot it Up


Raise.

Shoot the Moon


Scoop (1- Declare both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare. 2- Win both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare.). In both cases, this phrase is usually heard in home games, and not public card rooms. The term is sometimes shortened to simply moon.

Shoot the Pot


Raise.

Shoot the Pot Up


Raise.

Shootout


A tournament format in which a single player ends up with the entire prize money, or in which play continues at each table until only one player remains.

Shootout Tournament


1) A special tournament in which a number of tables of players each play down to one winner, and then the winners of each table compete in the playoff. Often all players who make it to the final table receive a prize, usually ranging from an amount equal to the buy-in for the first busted out to the main prize, which often is 40 to 50% of the total prize pool. 2) A tournament in which one player ends up with all the money, one that is played till only one player remains.

Shop


1) A card room. Also called joint or store. 2) Stop in at a card room just to check out the action.

Short


1) Low on funds. 2) Shy of a complete bet. "Who's short in the pot?" implies that someone has not put in a full bet. "He's short $10" means that he was not able to call the full bet, and implies that a side pot will be generated. 3) Be unable to pay time due to having insufficient chips (in respect to a certain cutoff point established by the house, usually equal to only a few chips, as for example less than $4 in a game with a $20 buy-in). 4) Not put the full amount of the bet in the pot. "Who shorted the pot?"

Short Buy


A buy-in of less than the minimum required for the game.

Short Call


While going all in, calling less than the full bet (and thus generating a side pot).

Short Cards


Any card game other than poker (such as gin or klabberjass), usually used to describe a game played by two (sometimes more) players while awaiting a seat in a poker game.

Short Flush


Four-card flush, so termed mainly in European countries.

Short Game


1) Less than a full table. "I don't like to play in a short game." 2) Two-handed game. Many card rooms have among their rules one that reads, "No short games." They do not want players to play head up

Short Money


1) Less than a player would normally buy in to a particular game with.2) Having not enough money to survive the ordinary fluctuations of a particular game. "The game's terrific, but Jim's not going to last unless he gets real lucky; he's playing on short money

Short Odds


The odds for an event that has a good chance of occurring.

Short Pair


In high draw poker, a small pair; often any pair less than jacks; any pair smaller than the opening requirements for the game. Also called shorts, pair of shorts

Short Stack


A short stack is a stack that's too small to cover the likely betting in a hand. A player who has such a stack is said to be short-stacked. This has advantages (e.g., that you cannot be pressured to fold) and disadvantages (e.g., that you cannot get maximum value from your winning hands).

Short Straight


Four-card straight, so termed mainly in European countries

Short Studs


The British name for five-card stud and its variants.

Short the Pot


Any cheating move. "He has to get a little booze in him before he takes a shot."

Short-Cards


An obsolete name for poker.

Short-Chipped


Playing with only a small amount of money, thus limiting one's risk and reward.

Shorthanded


A game is said to be shorthanded when it falls below a certain number of players. Most poker tables accommodate nine or ten players. Five players is clearly shorthanded, nine players is clearly not. Since many people are uncomfortable playing shorthanded, some card rooms make special provisions for shorthanded tables - reducing the blinds or the rake, or providing shills or props. Since the number of players at a table has a significant impact on strategy, learning to play well shorthanded is an important skill. This is especially true in tournaments, where shorthanded play is much more common.

Shorts


Short pair. Sometimes a pair of shorts.

Short-Stacked


Playing with only a small amount of money, thus limiting one's risk and reward.

Shot


1) An Angle shot (A poker player who uses various underhanded, unfair methods to take advantage of inexperienced opponents. ). 2) A chance to play. "I'd sure like a shot in that game." 3) A stake. If a player (usually one without money) asks a floor person to "Give me a shot," he is asking if the floor person would put him in the game, that is, stake him. 4) Any cheating move. "He has to get a little booze in him before he takes a shot."

Shot Taker


Angle shooter (A poker player who uses various underhanded, unfair methods to take advantage of inexperienced opponents. ).

Shotgun


This game is basically Five Card Draw with the exception that there are more betting rounds. In this game each player is dealt five cards of their own: Three down, followed by round of betting, another down followed by another round of betting, the fifth card down followed by another round of betting. Everyone can then draw up to three cards and then there is a final round of betting. This is an expensive game due to all of the betting rounds. A high two pair often takes this game.

Show


Show down.

Show Cards


1) Those cards dealt face up in stud games; the cards on one's board; up cards. 2) Expose one's hole cards (in a stud or hold 'em game) or all or part of one's hand (in a draw game) to one or more other players. If Jim shows his hand to his neighbor, someone might say, "Hey, Jim. Don't show cards."

Show Down


Participate in a showdown.

Show Five Cards


A variant of seven stud, found only in home games, in which each player receives seven cards and then, on a signal from the dealer, exposes one card at a time, each followed by a round of betting, until five are exposed; the game is often played high-low

Show One, Show All


Most card rooms have a rule, generally referred to as "show one show all," that if a player shows their cards to anyone at the table they can be asked to show everyone else (even if they would ordinarily not be required to show their hand). This usually comes up at the end of a hand that did not reach showdown (e.g., if a player shows a friend a successful bluff). Obviously showing one's hand to someone else who has cards is illegal for more reasons.

Show Openers


In a game with minimum opening requirements, such as jacks or better, prove that you had openers when you opened a pot. If you opened the pot and then bet after the draw and are not called, or if you fold, you must show openers. You do so by showing only as much of the hand as it takes. That is, if you opened with three jacks, you need show only two of them, but if you opened with a pat straight, you must show the entire hand. If you opened with a full house, 10s full of 3s, you need show only the three 10s; with 7s full of jacks, you need show only the two jacks

Show Tickets


1) The third-best hand in a showdown. Comes from the horse racing term show, plus tickets. 2) A form of draw poker, found only in home games, in which the third-best hand wins

Showdown


1) The point in a hand, after all the betting is over, at which the players turn their cards face up for comparison with all active hands, to determine which hand (or hands in a split-pot game) wins the pot (and, if there are one or more side pots, which hand or hands win which side pots). Sometimes called lay down. 2) A hand of poker played with no draw, and no bet beyond that made before the deal of the cards. Sometimes this is played by two or more players for the odd chips they have, or for an amount that will get one of them even and the others even more stuck. Often called a hand of showdown. "Okay, fellas, the three of us are all down about $20. Let's play a hand of showdown for $10, and then one of us will be even and the other two will be stuck $30 each."

Showing


Pertaining to one's face-up cards in stud games, that is, the cards on one's board. "What's he got showing?" means what does he have on the board?

Shuck


1) Discard (Throw one or more cards from your hand.). 2) Substitute (Replace a card in stud, that is, receive a twist.).

Shuffle


Before each hand, the dealer shuffles the cards - mixes them up in order to make their order as unpredictable as possible. Most card rooms have fairly specific requirements for how the cards are to be shuffled.

Shuffle in


Add one or more cards to the deck while shuffling.

Shuffle in a Brief


Shuffle in such a way as to produce a brief in the deck.

Shuffle the Spots Off


Shuffle excessively. When Slow Sam gives the deck 15 painfully laconic shuffles, one of the losers is sure to say, "Don't shuffle the spots off of 'em." Also, rub the spots off.

Shuffler


The person who shuffles the cards just prior to dealing. The term usually refers to someone other than the dealer, when the dealer does not perform the shuffling. Sometimes in home games, the player to the right of the dealer (the person who actually distributes the cards) shuffles the cards, offers them to the person on his right for a cut, and then hands the deck over to the person on his left for dealing.

Shut Out


In a no-limit game, bet so much that another player cannot or will not call.

Shy


1) Short of the complete bet. "He's shy by $20." 2) Not having anted. "Who's shy?" means "Who forgot to ante?" Also called light, short.

Shylock


1) Loan shark. Sometimes capitalized. 2) Lend money at usurious rates.

Sickening


6 (the card, or the lowball hand).

Sickle


Having the four lowest cards to a wheel; preceded by the rank of the top card. (The term is usually reserved for 10s and worse.)

Side


1) Side pot. Often part of the term on the side. 2) Referring to money that goes into or belongs in the side pot. "John's out of chips, so Jim's last bet is side money."

Side Action


The action in and the playing of side games.

Side Arms


In a two pair hand, the lower pair.

Side Bet


1) An agreement among two or more players to pay off privately based on their original holdings. Examples are points, colors, low spade, and a back line agreement. These sorts of bet arrangements are particularly frowned on by the house, because they involve exposing too many cards, and also slow the game down while comparisons and verifications are made. 2) A bet made privately among two or more players on the outcome of the next hand, usually made by players not involved in the pot; the side bet is not part of the pot. Most clubs do not permit side bets. 3) Rarely, a bet in a side pot.

Side Card


1) The fifth card in a hand consisting of two pairs. 2) The card that decides the winner between two otherwise tied two-pair hands (sometimes the one or more cards--in which case the term is pluralized--needed to resolve a tie between two one-pair hands). Sometimes called kicker in this sense. 3) A card that has no worth to a hand.

Side Cards


Cards other than those that determine the value or rank of the hand.

Side Game


At a poker tournament, a game other than the tournament game, usually consisting of players who have busted out of the tournament and players who come to tournaments expressly to get into side games because the action is often better than that of the tournament. Also, ring game.

Side Money


1) Side pot. 2) The money or chips in a side pot.

Side Partner


A thief's confederate.

Side Pot


A separate pot contested by other players when one player runs out of money.

Side Strippers


Cards whose sides (long edges) have been shaved or trimmed by a thief so they can be located by feel during manipulation of the deck. These cards are somewhat thinner than ordinary cards, allowing the thief to find them easily. Also called belly strippers.

Siegfried and Roy


In hold 'em, two queens as one's first two cards.

Sight


A situation in which one player runs out of chips (that is, goes all in), and claims sight, that is, the right to a showdown for the amount of chips he has put in the pot thus far. This is an old term rarely used nowadays.

Sign


A signal given by a cheater to a confederate, usually of someone else holdings. Also sometimes called office.

Sign Off


Give someone a signal, usually of someone else holdings; used by cheaters. "He signed him off" means that he gave his partner a signal that gave away the hand of another player that the signaler had managed to get a look at. Sometimes part of the phrase sign off a hand. Signing off is sometimes called piping.

Sign Off a Hand


Give someone a signal, usually of someone else holdings; used by cheaters. "He signed him off" means that he gave his partner a signal that gave away the hand of another player that the signaler had managed to get a look at. Sometimes part of the phrase sign off a hand. Signing off is sometimes called piping.

Sign Up


1) Get on the board for a particular game. "Did you sign up for the 15-30?" 2) Register for a tournament. "Did you sign up for the no-limit hold 'em at the Pasatiempo?"3) Give someone a signal, usually of someone else holdings; used by cheaters. "He signed him off" means that he gave his partner a signal that gave away the hand of another player that the signaler had managed to get a look at. Sometimes part of the phrase sign off a hand. Signing off is sometimes called piping.

Sign Up for


1) Get on the board for a particular game. "Did you sign up for the 15-30?" 2) Register for a tournament. "Did you sign up for the no-limit hold 'em at the Pasatiempo?"

Signal


1) Private communication between thieves; often plural. A hand spread face-down on the table, meaning "go" or "it's safe," and a fist on the table, meaning "don't go" or "it's not safe," are "standard" signals.

Sign-Up Board


A list of players' names or initials, those who want seating in or changes to particular games. In many clubs, there really is a blackboard or other large writing surface at the front or side of the room with lists of names.

Sign-Up List


The list of names for a particular game; the board.

Silent Partner


A no cheating, innocent player to whom a thief gives several winning hands, usually in small pots, to divert attention from himself. This is a specialized usage of the more general term for a business partner who takes no active part in the business, and, in many cases, is unknown to the public.

Silent Prop


A proposition player who does not openly acknowledge his role by the wearing of a badge. In many card rooms, particularly in California, a proposition player must conspicuously display a badge indicating that he or she works for the card room

Simoleon


$1 or a $1 chip.

Simultaneous Declaration


The usual form of declaration in a high-low split game, usually with chips and everyone opening a hand at once to indicate whether contesting low, high, or both ways.

Single Limit


A form of limit poker (generally referring to draw poker, in particular limit draw or lowball as played in Northern California), in which all bets, before and after the draw, are in multiples of the same increment, as opposed to double limit, in which the limit doubles after the draw.

Single-Blind Game


A traveling blind game with one game; under-the-gun blind game.

Single-Handed Poker


1) An early form of poker, in which players received five cards, and bet on their original cards, in much the same as draw poker, but there was no draw. 2) Five card draw poker, high, with no wild cards.

Single-O


A thief or cheater who works alone.

Single-Table Satellite


A special tournament whose prize is usually a buy-in for a larger tournament. One-table satellites usually have just one winner; sometimes second place is awarded a free entry to another tournament. In larger satellite tournaments, the winner may get entry to the larger tournament, round-trip airfare plus accommodations (if the satellite takes place in a city other than that of the larger tournament), plus some percentage of the excess cash accumulated in buy-ins and re-buys. Second, third, and sometimes other places also can win a percentage of this cash. A satellite tournament with a large number of entrants, awarding entry or entries to major tournaments, is called a super satellite.

Sir


Offence. If someone says "nice hand, sir," after you win a big pot, what they are really saying is, "congratulations on winning money through your own stupidity, you clueless moron."

Sit


Join a game.

Sit in


1) Join a game. "May I sit in?" is a request from an onlooker to get into a game. 2) Play poker.

Sitter


A conservative player, one who gives little action, that is, one who sits and waits for only the good hands

Six Card Stud


Variation of Poker. In six card stud (sometimes "six stud"), each player is dealt six cards of their own: two down, then three up, and a final card down. There is a round of betting after the first up card and after each subsequent card dealt

Six Tits


Three queens. This usage is considered vulgar.

Six-Card Option


A form of six-card stud, found exclusively in home games, in which each player receives one card face down and one face up, followed by a round of betting, with a round of betting after each successive up card, till the fifth card, then a down card, and then a twist, with a further round of betting; the game is played high-low. At the showdown, a player uses the best five of the six cards; (usually) one set of five cards can be used for high and another for low

Sixth


In a split-pot game, split either the low or the high half of the pot with two other players; usually part of the phrase get sixthed. This happens occasionally in Omaha/8. "My ace-deuce got sixthed."

Sixth Street


The sixth card dealt in 7-card stud.

Size


In a big bet game, perform a dealer's method of equalizing two wagers. When one player puts out a large stack of chips, and another player calls by placing in the pot more chips than are required for the call (and either does not say the magic word "Raise" or obviously does not have enough chips to constitute a raise), the dealer may not count the first player's chips, but merely places the second stack of chips next to the first, and removes enough chips from the second stack until the two stacks are equal in height. This method originated with dealers in casino percentage games (such as 21 or craps), who paid off winning bets this way, so that watchers (security personnel, perhaps occupying the "eye in the sky") could clearly see that the payoff was correct.

Sizz


A rush (Several winning hands in a short period of time.); usually part of the phrase putting on a sizz.

Skating


Bluffing. "I think you're skating, but I'm gonna let you slide."

Skeet


In draw poker, a nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, any hand containing a 9, 5, and a 2, with one card between the 9 and the 5 and another between the 5 and the 2. This hand is also called a pelter or sometimes a kilter (both of which have wider meanings). The hand generally ranks between three of a kind and an "ordinary" straight.

Skeet Flush


In draw poker, a nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, a skeet in one suit. The hand generally ranks somewhere above an "ordinary" straight, sometimes better than four of a kind

Skin


1) $1 or a $1 bill. 2) Deal cards by sliding them off the deck as it lies on the table, and across the table to the recipients, instead of holding the deck in the air and lifting each card while it is dealt. This method is often used just for the draw in a draw game. 3) Cheat someone. 4) Look at your cards by spreading them slightly.

Skin Game


A game containing two or more thieves, or cheats playing partners.

Skin Out


Show down a hand by spreading it on the table.

Skin the Deck


Palm one or more cards, for later introduction into the game.

Skin the Hand


To clean up (Get rid of the evidence after making a cheating maneuver. A thief may deal himself six cards, and play the best five. When he conceals the extra card among the discards, he is cleaning up. ).

Skinner


One who cheats by removing cards from the deck. Also known as holdout artist.

Skinning


Removing cards from a new deck, altering some or all of the cards (by marking), returning the cards to the deck, and resealing the deck.

Skip Straight


In draw poker, a nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, cards in a series separated each from the other by one rank, as 2-4-6-8-10, or 5-7-9-J-K. Some play that an ace ranks only high in a skip straight, that is, that A-3-5-7-9 is not considered a skip straight. A skip straight is also called an alternate straight, Dutch straight, or sometimes a kilter. The hand generally ranks between three of a kind and an "ordinary" straight.

Skipper


In draw poker, a nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, cards in a series separated each from the other by one rank, as 2-4-6-8-10, or 5-7-9-J-K. Some play that an ace ranks only high in a skip straight, that is, that A-3-5-7-9 is not considered a skip straight. A skip straight is also called an alternate straight, Dutch straight, or sometimes a kilter. The hand generally ranks between three of a kind and an "ordinary" straight.

Sky's the Limit


A term, generally used only in home games, for a no-limit game.

Sleeve


1) On the cuff (Pertaining to unsecured card room credit. "Can I have some chips on the cuff?" means the asker will pay back the money if he wins, or, if he loses, at some future unspecified time.). 2) Sleeve holdout (A kind of holdout machine. A sleeve holdout straps to the thief's arm and the cards are held up the thief's sleeve.).

Sleeve Holdout


A kind of holdout machine. A sleeve holdout straps to the thief's arm and the cards are held up the thief's sleeve.

Sleeve Machine


Sleeve holdout (A kind of holdout machine. A sleeve holdout straps to the thief's arm and the cards are held up the thief's sleeve.).

Slick


1) Smooth. 8-4-3-2-A and 8-5-3-2-A are slick 8s, while any 8-7 is rough.2) A cheating preparation, make the backs of some cards more slippery so that they slide more easily.

Slick-Ace Deck


A deck whose aces have had their backs slicked to make them slide out more easily when the deck is in the control of a thief

Slide


Escape. "I'm gonna let you slide," that is, not call your obvious bluff.

Slip


1) Pass, with the implication of sandbagging (Playing a strong hand as if it were only a fair one.); often followed by it. If a player says, "I'll slip it," he's trying to give the impression that he passed a good hand, probably because in reality he passed a medium hand with which he doesn't want to have to call a bet. 2) Palm a card, for later introduction into the game.

Slip a Hand


Sandbag (Playing a strong hand as if it were only a fair one.). "You slipped me a hand didn't you?, but I'm not going to fall into your trap."

Slip it


Pass, with the implication of sandbagging; often followed by it. If a player says, "I'll slip it," he's trying to give the impression that he passed a good hand, probably because in reality he passed a medium hand with which he doesn't want to have to call a bet.

Slip the Cards


Set a stacked packet on top of the deck after the deck has been cut.

Slip the Cut


Set a stacked packet on top of the deck after the deck has been cut.

Slip the Deck


Set a stacked packet on top of the deck after the deck has been cut.

Slippery Anne


The queen of spades.

Slippery Sandbag


Checking with a very strong hand and then, if bet into, just calling (rather than raising), setting the trap for future rounds of betting.

Slow


When you play passively, you are playing slow.

Slow Action


The state of a slow game.

Slow Game


A game with little action, that is, not much betting and raising, or, in a no-limit game, with few large bets.

Slow Pace


Slow pace describes a game without much betting and raising.

Slow Play


To play a strong hand weakly, by checking instead of betting or by calling instead of raising. Usually done to win extra bets by keeping more players around for future rounds of betting.

Slowball


Humorous name for a slow lowball game.

Slow-Down Bet


In a no-limit game, a bet smaller than one ordinarily might make or than the situation calls for, in the hopes of keeping from having to call a larger bet if one passed instead of betting.

Slowroll


To reveal one's hand slowly at showdown, one card at a time, is to slow roll. This is usually only done with a winning hand, for the purpose of irritating other players (well, some people do it innocently).

Slug


A clump of cards, usually implying that they have been deliberately arranged and shuffled into position by a cheat.

Slug the Deck


Place a slug into a deck (A clump of cards, usually implying that they have been deliberately arranged and shuffled into position by a cheat.) and shuffle it into a prearranged position.

Small Bet


In a double-limit game, a bet at the smaller bet size.

Small Blind


The smaller of the two compulsory bets in flop games, made by the player in the first postion to the dealer's left.

Small Game


A poker table (in a card room) with small stakes.

Small Nickel


1) A $50 bill. 2) $50 in cash. 3) $50 in chips.

Small One


1) A $100 bill. 2) $100 in cash. 3) $100 in chips. For all meanings, sometimes called big one. Small one is often used when big one is used for $1000.

Small Play


Playing for small stakes.

Small Table


A poker table (in a card room) with small stakes.

Smear


Substance for marking the backs of cards.

Smooth


The best possible low hand with a particular high card. 8432A is a smooth 8.

Smooth Call


To call one or more bets with a hand that's strong enough for a raise, with the intention of trapping more money in the pot. Smooth call is like flat call, although it more strongly connotes a powerful hand that one is trying to slow play.

Snake


Bend one or more cards, for later identification by a thief.

Snakebit


Having bad luck. "How ya doin'?" "Terrible. I've been snakebit for a week. Can't make a hand when it counts.

Snap Off


1) Catch someone bluffing. 2) Catch a card on the end (as the river card or seventh card in seven-card stud, the last community card in hold 'em, or on the draw in draw games) to beat a hand that was leading up to that point.

Snapped Off


Caught bluffing.

Snatch


Money taken from each pot and given to the house in return for hosting the game. Usually a percentage of the pot (5%-10%) up to some maximum amount. Also Rake.

Snatch Game


A less-common name for rake game. Sometimes snatch game implies a game in which the dealer takes more than he is supposed to, or takes all that he can get away with, whereas rake game is just the generic term for that method of making its money by the house

Sneak


The removal of a card by a player who is holding out or using a holdout machine or the reintroduction of a card into play.

Snoozer


The joker when used as a "partially wild card" in high draw poker and ace-to-five lowball. In high, it is good for aces, straights, and flushes. It makes a third (or fourth) ace, but does not improve any other pair. In a deck with the bug, a rank of hand exists higher than any straight flush: five aces. Also Bug.

Snow


To bluff.

Snow Hand


In draw poker, a hand with which you snow (bluff), sometimes by making, in high, a pat hand bluff, or in lowball, by standing pat on any five garbage cards.

Snow Job


1) A hand with which you snow (bluff). 2) A bluff.

Snow the Cards


Shuffle a deck or the cards in a hand overhand by pulling a few cards at a time from the top to the bottom.

Snowball


A worthless hand.

Snowmen


Two or more 8s. (That's what they look like.)

Social Game


A friendly game.

Society


Chips of relatively large denomination. In a small game, in which dollar chips are used for most bets, $5 chips would be considered society chips; in a $20 game, with most bets made with $5 chips, society chips would probably be $20 chips. Chips of the highest denomination for the game are sometimes called high society chips

Society Chips


Chips of relatively large denomination. In a small game, in which dollar chips are used for most bets, $5 chips would be considered society chips; in a $20 game, with most bets made with $5 chips, society chips would probably be $20 chips. Chips of the highest denomination for the game are sometimes called high society chips

Sock it Up.


Raise.

Soft


1) Smooth, as a soft 8. 2) In lowball, pertaining to a limit game played at slighter higher than its normal stakes.

Soft Break


The changing of currency, usually for part cash and part chips.

Soft-Play


Without putting pressure on. "He always plays her soft" means that when he gets in a pot with this particular young lady, he does not bluff her, nor does he try to push her around with aggressive betting

Soft-Play Someone


Put no pressure on a person, as described under soft.

Sökö


A variant of five-card stud, played mainly in Scandinavian countries, in which a four-straight ranks higher than one pair, and a four-flush ranks higher than a four-straight and just under two pair. The game is usually played pot limit.

Solid


Conservative, not likely to get out of line; said of someone's play or a player.

Something


In a no-limit game, a (usually) substantial bet. "You passed? I'm going to bet something."

Sore Spot


4 (the card); imitates four spot.

Sorts


A deck made up by taking portions from several decks, usually for the purpose of cheating. This is done to, for example, take advantage of slight differences in patterns in different runs of cards. The diamonds on one deck may meet at the edges slightly differently from one deck to another, but, to the untrained eye, the patterns would look the same on the backs of all the cards.

Soup


To reveal one's hand in a showdown.

Soup a Hand


To reveal one's hand in a showdown.

South


Go south.1) Remove chips surreptitiously from the table (so called because on a map that's the direction they go), or pocket winnings while playing. Also called rat hole. 2) Palm or otherwise surreptitiously remove cards from the deck for later introduction (by a thief) at an opportune moment. 3) Leave a game or card room with money obtained dishonestly. 4) Disappear. "I lent him $20 and he went south with it."

Southern Cross


A form of Cincinnati, in which each player is dealt five cards face down, and nine cards are dealt face down in the center, in the form of a cross, forming five vertical and five horizontal cards, with each player allowed to combine any or all of either the vertical or horizontal cards together with his original cards in forming a five-card hand. The widow cards are turned up one at a time, usually clockwise or counterclockwise from the outside, working inward, with the center card turned up last, each followed by a betting round. Some play that the center card and others of the same rank are wild. In a variation, called X marks the spot, the widow consists of five cards, forming two rows of three

Spade


1) Any card in the spades suit. 2) Low spade or high spade. "You wanna spade for a drink?"

Spades


1) One of the four suits in a deck of cards, whose symbol is shaped like an inverted valentine with a stem. Originally, spades may have represented the peasant class, the spade being an instrument used by farmers. In both the traditional and four-color deck, they are black. 2) A spade flush, that is, five cards of the same suit, all spades. "I've got a straight; whadda you got?" "Spades."

Spadoodles


Spades. One of the four suits in a deck of cards, whose symbol is shaped like an inverted valentine with a stem. Originally, spades may have represented the peasant class, the spade being an instrument used by farmers. In both the traditional and four-color deck, they are black.

Speak


Bet. "Your turn to speak."

Special Hand


1) Nonstandard hand. 2) Premium hand (A hand that entitles the holder of the hand to a premium (A bonus or royalty paid by all players to the holder of a particular hand, or a very high hand.). Also called special hand.).

Speed


1) Play recklessly (by betting and raising frequently and aggressively); so called because one speeds by playing fast. 2) Act out of turn. "It isn't your turn to bet, John. You're speeding. Joan hasn't acted yet." 3) Excessive gamble; often used in admiration. "She's got a lotta speed!"

Speed Hold 'em


A casino variant of hold 'em in which each player gets four cards, discards two, and five cards are flopped right away.

Speed Table


1) A poker table specially constructed with a position for a house dealer. 2) A rake game; so called because the faster the dealer puts out the hands, the more money the house makes.

Speeder


One who speeds.

Speeding


Playing recklessly, making large (in a no-limit game) or frequent bets and bluffing a lot, that is, playing with considerable speed. "Don't get caught speeding."

Speedup after Fold


Controls whether the game will speedup after you fold. If you fold when this option is selected, the animation and sound effects will be disabled throughout the rest of the hand. This means you can zip to the end of the hand and see how it ends without having to wait.

Speedy


Describing one who plays with a lot of speed.

Spider


A kind of holdout machine (A mechanical device enabling thieves to surreptitiously hold out. Holdout machines used to be more popular many years ago, but are not often seen now, probably because thieves are becoming more sophisticated, and also because being caught with one is dangerous. Also called a string.), a holdout device with a simple spring-loaded clasp that attaches to a vest or jacket.

Spike


1) Nail (Mark a card, often with a fingernail. Also called spur.). 2) In (usually) hold 'em, catch on the board precisely the card needed to match your hand, usually the third to your pair, sometimes another of the same rank; always followed by the card in question. "I was betting my two pair all the way, and he spiked another deuce on the river." 3) An ace.

Spit


1) Spit in the ocean (A form of widow poker). 2) Spit card (The card turned up in spit in the ocean).

Spit Card


The card turned up in spit in the ocean (A form of widow poker).

Spit in the Ocean


A form of widow poker, played only in home games, in which each player is dealt four cards face down, and one card is dealt face-up in the center, which rank is then wild in and part of anyone's hand. Usually the card is turned up at the point at which some player other than the dealer calls out, "Spit!" After a round of betting, each player can draw to his four-card hand.

Splash


To throw your chips into the pot, instead of placing them in front of you, is to splash the pot. Doing so can make it difficult for the dealer to determine if you've bet the correct amount, or to keep track of the action.

Splash Around


To play more loosely than you should.

Splash the Pot


To throw your chips into the pot, instead of placing them in front of you. This makes it difficult for the dealer to determine the amount you bet.

Split Openers


In draw poker, to discard one or more openers, usually to draw to a straight or flush. Normally requires the opener to declare the act and retain the discards so that the act of opening can later be validated.

Split Out


When a player quits who went cow (that is, with whom the house or another player went half and half on the buy-in) or who was staked, if he won, he splits out (splits those winnings with the house or the person who was his partner). Also cut out.

Split Pair


The situation in a stud game in which a player has a pair, with one card face up and the other in the hole.

Split Pot


1) A tie, that is, the situation in which two (or more) players have identical hands, with the pot divided between them. 2) A pot that is divided between the holder of the high and the low hand in a high-low split game, or some other form of split-pot game.

Split Someone Out


After the house has gone cow with someone, when the player gets far enough ahead of the game, the house may split him out, that is, remove half of his chips and put him on his own. In some games, the players object to chips leaving the table (in fact, there is often a house rule against that), so the player has to cash out to split out.

Split the Pot


A pot which is shared by two or more players because they have equivalent hands.

Split Two Pair


A two pair hand in which one of each of your cards' ranks appears on the board as well.

Split Week


An inside straight.

Split-Pot Game


1) High-low split game. 2) Some other game in which the pot is split between the holders of two hands, as determined by other criteria, such as Black Maria or seven-twenty-seven.

Spoke


In ace-to-five lowball, any ace, 2, 3, 4, or 5. Also called wheel card.

Sponsor


1) Someone buying you a drink or meal. If someone offers you a drink at the table, when you call the cocktail waitress, you can say, "Bring me a drink; I've got a sponsor." 2) Someone who puts up a player's buy-in, usually to a tournament, in exchange for a portion of the profits, if any. 3) Pay someone's buy-in to a game or entry to a tournament, in exchange for a portion of the profits, if any.

Spot


A card; always preceded by its rank. For example, a 4-spot is a 4.

Spot Card


Any card 2 through 10.

Spots


Pips. The suit symbols on a non-court card, indicating its rank.

Spotted Papers


Marked cards. Sometimes shortened to papers.

Spotter


A card 4 through 10. When one of these cards is lying face down, and you lift the lower right corner, you can see spots in the corner (as opposed to a no-spotter, which has no spots in the corner, or a liner, which is a face card). Some lowball players couple the knowledge that a card could be one of these (but that they don't know which one) with game theory to decide on whether or not to bet. (Impartial observers might say they're just playing games with themselves, but we don't make judgments; we just define terms.)

Spread


1) Start a game. "Don't leave; we're about to spread a 20." 2) Show down; usually followed by a or the hand. "When I showed my pat 6-4, he spread a bicycle." 3) A game. If you phone your local card emporium, and ask the floor man how many games are going, he might say, "I have five spreads." 4) The act of exposing one's cards at the showdown. Also called roll.

Spread a Hand


Show down; usually followed by a or the hand. "When I showed my pat 6-4, he spread a bicycle."

Spread Limit


Poker in which the betting limits are somewhere between single limit and no limit. Bets have a range, from a minimum to a maximum.

Spread the Hand


Respond to a request to see the entire hand. If someone cannot see the winning hand, she might say to the dealer, "Spread the hand."

Spring


Suddenly make a large bet.

Spring Table


A card table made for cheating, with cracks that look like honest defects through which cards can be retrieved when acted upon by a spring attached to the underside of the table.

Spur


Mark cards with one's fingernails, particularly sharp thumbnails, or some other sharp instrument.

Spurr


Mark cards with one's fingernails, particularly sharp thumbnails, or some other sharp instrument.

Square


1) Honest. 2) Arrange the deck in a neat pile of cards, with no edges protruding, prior to dealing; usually followed by the cards or the deck

Square Deal


An honest deal, as indicated by a deck containing no trimmed or shaved cards. The term has passed into general usage.

Square Deck


An honest deck, that is, one containing no trimmed or shaved cards, as observable when it is arranged into a squared deck.

Square Game


An honest game, as indicated by its being played with a deck containing no trimmed or shaved or otherwise marked cards.

Square the Table


A request to the dealer to make sure that all the players sit in their proper positions, that is, with no one off-center and crowding someone else (likely the player making the request).

Square Up the Table


Ensure that all the players sit in their proper positions, that is, with all centered and equally spaced.

Squared Deck


A deck arranged in a neat pile, with no edges protruding, usually prior to cutting or dealing.

Squeeze


1) In a draw game, look at one's cards slowly; so called because players start with their cards tightly squared together, such that they can see only the first card, and then slowly squeeze them apart, that is, separate them, causing each card to reveal itself, slowly, one at a time, as if the viewer wishes to surprise himself with the cards; this is often done agonizingly slowly, frequently when it is the squeezer's turn to act, as if the player deliberately wants to annoy the others, while he pretends to be innocent of any knowledge of what effect his slowness is having. Sometimes called sweat. "Hey, don't squeeze the spots off of `em; we're paying time here." 2) Whipsaw (To raise before, and after, a caller who gets caught in the middle.).

Squeeze Bet


1) squeeze play. (The situation in which a player is whipsawed. (To raise before, and after, a caller who gets caught in the middle.).) 2) A bet to extract additional chips from a player not likely to win a pot, or, in high-low split, not likely to share in a split.

Squeeze in


Squeeze ( In a draw game, look at one's cards slowly; so called because players start with their cards tightly squared together, such that they can see only the first card, and then slowly squeeze them apart, that is, separate them, causing each card to reveal itself, slowly, one at a time, as if the viewer wishes to surprise himself with the cards.).

Squeeze Out


1) Squeeze (In a draw game, look at one's cards slowly; so called because players start with their cards tightly squared together, such that they can see only the first card, and then slowly squeeze them apart, that is, separate them, causing each card to reveal itself, slowly, one at a time, as if the viewer wishes to surprise himself with the cards.). 2) Force a player out of a pot by the size or intensity of betting or raising.

Squeeze Play


The situation in which a player is whipsawed. (To raise before, and after, a caller who gets caught in the middle.).

Squeezers


Special cards with suit and rank printed at the corners, so these can be seen by just barely squeezing back the corners. (This is the ordinary card format now, but many years ago, cards had no markings in their corners.)

Stack


1) The amount of money you have in front of you on the poker table (i.e., stack of chips). Often used in the plural. 2) A stack can also refer to a particular number of chips. Most chip racks take stacks of 20 chips. Many players like to keep their chips in stacks of particular numbers of chips.

Stack Off


In no limit, bet all your chips; move all in.

Stack Poker


In no-limit, play in such a way that you get all your chips into the pot nearly every hand, that is go all in (stack off) whenever possible.

Stack the Deck


Arrange the deck by some slSeven-of-hand maneuver, as done by a cheat, and described under stack.

Stacked Deal


A deal made with a stacked deck.

Stacked Deck


A deck that has been arranged to give one player a huge advantage.

Stack-Off


All of your chips. "Did he bet?" "Yep, that was a stack-off."

Stake


1) The amount of a player's Buy-In, or the amount of money they are willing to play with in a given session. 2) A player's bankroll; the money a player needs to get into a game. 3) Put someone into a game with house chips. 4) Give someone chips to play on, that is, back that player.

Stake Player


A player given house chips to play for the purpose of starting a game that would otherwise be short, or to keep a game that is becoming short from breaking up. A stake player keeps half his profits (after returning to the house the amount given him when he was first put in), usually at the end of a shift, but absorbs none of the losses. When he receives his share of the profits, this is the split-out.

Stakes


The size of a game, with respect to its betting increments or limits (or lack thereof). In a $2-limit game, for example, the stakes are just that, $2. In a no-limit game, the stakes are unlimited. In anything in between, the stakes are usually described by the minimum and maximum bets, sometimes by the amount required for a buy-in.

Stakes Player


A player in a stakes play game.

Stamped Cards


Cards marked on their backs during printing and sold to thieves for cheating purposes.

Stand


In a draw game, at the time for the draw (card replacement), draw no cards. "How many do you want?" "I'll stand."

Stand Pat


To decline an opportunity to draw cards.

Stand Up


Have a hand win, when one or more other hands are trying to, in draw, draw out on it, or, in stud or hold 'em, catch winning cards against it. "How do you like my chances?" "I had two little pair against three one-card draws, and the hand stood up.".

Standard Deck


The 52-card deck, consisting of four suits (spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs) of 13 cards each (A, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, J, Q, K).

Stand-Off


1) A tie, in which the players divide the pot equally. 2) To call a raise. "Opener raises, I stand off"

Star


The joker. Also, man with the star.

Start the Action


Open the betting; make the first bet in a particular hand.

Starter


Game starter. (A card room employee who plays with House money, and does not share in any of his (her) winnings or losses. Shills are used to facilitate starting games, and keeping them going.).

Starting Hand


A player's first two cards in hold 'em or first three cards in seven-card stud.

Starting Requirement


The minimum holding a particular player feels he needs to get involved in a hand. For a good player, the starting requirement takes position into account.

Stash


1) A bankroll (often hidden away, though generally readily accessible) for emergency situations. 2) Any bankroll. 3) Hide money; secrete one's bankroll.

Stay


To remain in a hand with a call rather than a raise.

Stay in


To remain in a hand with a call rather than a raise.

Stayer


1) Active player. In a draw game, "Cards to the stayers?" is a request from the dealer for those remaining in the pot to tell him how many cards they want. 2) A hand worth calling with, but not raising or initiating any betting.

Steal


A bluff in late position, attempting to steal the pot from a table of apparently weak hands.

Steal a Hand


Win (a pot) by bluffing.

Steal a Pot


Win (a pot) by bluffing.

Steal Position


In a game with blinds, a late position, often the dealer or the middle blind (if there are three blinds); so used because it is most likely from this position that a player attempts to steal the antes.

Steal the Antes


Win just the antes by bluffing; get everyone to fold, usually by opening in late position when no one else appears to be interested in the pot, before there is any real action, and thus win the antes.

Steal the Blinds


Win just the blinds by bluffing; get the blinds to fold, usually by opening in late position, and thus win the blinds.

Steam


1) Be on tilt. (Playing poorly and irrationally due to emotional upset, often caused by the player in question having had a good hand beat by a freak draw from another player (often in complete disregard of the odds and good play) or the player having lost a pot because of his own bad play. Also called steaming, having one's nose open, opened up, unglued and being wide open.).2) Raise; no longer frequently used. "He steamed it."

Steam Bet


A bet made by someone playing on tilt (Playing poorly and irrationally due to emotional upset, often caused by the player in question having had a good hand beat by a freak draw from another player (often in complete disregard of the odds and good play) or the player having lost a pot because of his own bad play. Also called steaming, having one's nose open, opened up, unglued and being wide open.).

Steamer


One who is on tilt (Playing poorly and irrationally due to emotional upset, often caused by the player in question having had a good hand beat by a freak draw from another player (often in complete disregard of the odds and good play) or the player having lost a pot because of his own bad play. Also called steaming, having one's nose open, opened up, unglued and being wide open.).

Steaming


Being on tilt (Playing poorly and irrationally due to emotional upset, often caused by the player in question having had a good hand beat by a freak draw from another player (often in complete disregard of the odds and good play) or the player having lost a pot because of his own bad play. Also called steaming, having one's nose open, opened up, unglued and being wide open.). "Big John's going to lose his whole bankroll tonight. He's stuck and steaming."

Steel Wheel


A straight flush, five high. That is, A2345 of the same suit. A pretty nice hand to have in a high-low split game.

Steer


Hustle someone into another game, often private.

Steer Game


An after-hours game, to which players are steered (Hustle someone into another game, often private.) from a card room. Someone, usually an accomplice of one of the thieves who runs the game, directs departing players to the private game.

Steer Joint


Phrase) A crooked card room.

Steer Man


One who steers players ( Hustle someone into another game, often private.).

Steer Money


Commission paid by the operators of a steer game to a steerer (Hustle someone into another game, often private.)

Steerer


One who steers players (Hustle someone into another game, often private.).

Stenographer


Queen (the card).

Step


A tiny "ledge" shuffled into a deck by a cheater so that his accomplice can cut it at the prearranged location; a card offset by a barely perceptible fraction of an inch but able to be found by touch when cut. A brief can be felt but not easily seen; a good cutter can feel a 1/32-inch brief. Sometimes called jog, needle, or brief.

Step Bet


Stakes of more than one limit, with, one betting limit on early rounds and a higher limit on succeeding rounds. This is the common card room practice.

Step Out


Bet; often implying (in a no-limit game) bet large.

Step the Deck


Cut a stacked deck such that it ends up with a step (A tiny "ledge" shuffled into a deck by a cheater so that his accomplice can cut it at the prearranged location) at the stacked portion.

Steppin' Out.


Betting.

Stew.


Two cards, please. (Heard in a draw game at the time of the draw.) Also Stu.

Stick


1) Stand or stand pat. (In a draw game, at the time for the draw (card replacement), draw no cards.) "How many cards do you want?" "I'll stick." This term is more common in home games; in card rooms, it is usually said only by inexperienced players. 2) Game starter (A card room employee who plays with House money, and does not share in any of his (her) winnings or losses. Shills are used to facilitate starting games, and keeping them going. ).

Stiff


1) After winning a pot, give no tip (toke) to the dealer.

Still Pack


The alternate deck, that is, the one not currently being dealt, in home games in which two decks are used. One deck is dealt while the other is being shuffled (by the shuffler) for the next deal.

Stock


1) Stub (The un-dealt portion of the cards, sometimes also called the deck, stock, or talon.). 2) Stack a deck, that is, prearrange the cards for cheating purposes.

Stone


Complete. "A stone beauty" means a good hand.

Stonewall


1) A tight player. 2) Stiff ( A player who makes a practice of not tipping the dealers.).

Stonewall Jackson


1) A tight player. 2) Stiff (A player who makes a practice of not tipping the dealers.).

Stoney.


Name for a tight player.

Store


Joint (Card room; gambling establishment. Also called store or shop. Sometimes part of the phrase bust-out joint, carpet joint, juice joint, sawdust join).

Stormy Weather


A form of widow poker, played only in home games, in which each player is dealt four cards face down, and three cards are dealt face-up in the center. After a round of betting, each player can draw to his four-card hand. The dealer then turns up each of the widow cards one at a time, each followed by a round of betting. Each player may use (only) one of the cards as part of his hand. The game is sometimes played high-low split.

Straddle


1) Over blind (Put in a blind when one is already present. In a traveling blind game, this could mean someone putting in an optional blind in addition to the mandatory blinds. In a game without mandatory blinds, this would be blinding a pot (putting in a blind) after someone else has killed it. (To put in an over blind is sometimes called to kill.) Sometimes called go the overs.). 2) Over blind (The blind put in by the person who over blinds.). Someone might say, "John acts last; he has the straddle." 3) The second of two forced blinds, usually put in by the player two positions to the left of the dealer position. In former years, these two bets were called blind and straddle. Some say that definition 3 is the only proper use of the word straddle.

Straddle Game


1) A traveling blind game, usually with three blinds. 2) A blind and straddle game.

Straggler


A player who is able to come in light, that is, for a small call, such as in a pass-and-back-in game, when the pot has been opened in late position and not raised, so a player who passed earlier can now limp in (To enter the round by calling a bet rather than raising.); a player coming in in this situation is called a straggler.

Straight


A hand consisting of 5 cards in sequence but not in suit.

Straight Draw


1) "Normal" five-card-draw high poker, bet-or-fold before the draw, open on anything, that is, no opening requirements, as opposed to, for example, jacks or better. Also called guts-to-open, pass-out. 2) A hand that contains four cards to a straight.

Straight Flush


A hand consisting of five cards of consecutive ranks of the same suit. A straight flush is the strongest possible hand. Of two straight flushes, the one with the highest high card is better. An ace high straight flush is often called a royal flush or a royal straight flush, or just a royal.

Straight Limit


A form of limit poker (generally referring to draw poker, in particular limit draw or lowball as played in Northern California), in which all bets, before and after the draw, are in multiples of the same increment, as opposed to double limit, in which the limit doubles after the draw.

Straight Poker


1) An early form of poker, in which players received five cards, and bet on their original cards, in much the same as draw poker, but there was no draw. 2) Five card draw poker, high, with no wild cards.

Straight Up


Pertaining to honest play; on the square. A former thief may tell a friend, "I don't need any edge [dishonest advantage]; I can beat this game straight up." The manager of a card room may say to a player whom the former knows to be capable (that is, has the ability to cheat), "You can play in here only if you play straight up."

Straightening


In high draw, drawing to a straight.

Straighting


In high draw, drawing to a straight.

Strange


Money other than one player's bet. That is, if a player puts $6 into a pot and the pot has $20 altogether, the pot holds $14 strange or $14 strange money.

Strange Money


Money other than one player's bet. That is, if a player puts $6 into a pot and the pot has $20 altogether, the pot holds $14 strange or $14 strange money.

Stranger


1) In draw poker, a card one hasn't seen in one's hand after the draw, while shuffling through the entire hand. When a player is squeezing his hand, and finds one of the cards he drew, he may say, "There's a stranger." This quotation sometimes implies a card that improves the hand. 2) A player unknown to the regulars in a game.

Strategic Bluff


A planned bluff, as opposed to one made on the spur of the moment.

Streak


A run of good or bad cards.

Street


The cards that come out one at a time in a card game are sometimes referred to as different numbered streets. The door card in seven card stud is third street, and subsequent cards are numbered consecutively. In hold'em and other flop games, players sometimes refer to the turn and river as fourth and fifth street.

String


Holdout machine (A mechanical device enabling thieves to surreptitiously hold out. Holdout machines used to be more popular many years ago, but are not often seen now, probably because thieves are becoming more sophisticated, and also because being caught with one is dangerous. Also called a string.).

String Bet


An unethical and often illegal means of raising whereby a player puts a call-size stack of chips into the pot and, after observing the reactions of the players, then goes back to his stack and puts out more, thus raising.

Strip


Trim the sides or edges of cards, to make them identifiable by feel to a thief. This produces strippers.

Strip Poker


A form of poker, generally played in mixed company, in which players use articles of clothing to purchase chips. As players need more chips, they must remove clothing; sometimes (rarely) the winners put those articles on. In some versions of the game, in each hand, all but the winner of the pot must remove one article of clothing; the drawback to this is the lack of an ante, unless players ante with clothing, in which case a disproportionate value is placed on any one article of clothing. This form of poker is not really related to the true nature of poker, whose goal is, for each player, to win money; the underlying nature of strip poker is to get almost everyone naked.

Stripped Deck


A deck with certain cards removed for special games, such as for Asian stud, a form of five-card stud played with a 32-card stripped deck, from which all cards 2 through 6 have been removed. In some European countries, and Australia, poker is sometimes played with a stripped deck from which the deuces and treys have been removed.

Stripped Pack


A deck with certain cards removed for special games, such as for Asian stud, a form of five-card stud played with a 32-card stripped deck, from which all cards 2 through 6 have been removed. In some European countries, and Australia, poker is sometimes played with a stripped deck from which the deuces and treys have been removed.

Stripper Deck


A deck marked by shaving the edges of some cards such that a thief can tell by feel the values of certain cards.

Strippers


(Always used in the plural) A deck marked by shaving the edges of some cards such that a thief can tell by feel the values of certain cards.

Stripping


Shuffling by rapidly pulling small packets from the top to the bottom of the deck.

Strong


1) Quite dishonest. "I just looked in at the lowball game. Jim's going really strong." This means that Jim is using some very dishonest cheating methods. 2) When pertaining to the rate at which chips are raked from a game heavily. "What? You take $2 out of every pot, even if no one plays? That's pretty strong."

Strong Hand


A hand that has a great likelihood of winning a pot; the nuts.

Strong Work


Marked cards whose markings are obvious and easily seen even by the untrained eye.

Stronger Than Nuts


Describing a game so very crooked that the live ones would find it harder to beat than the shell game. The nuts here refer to those used in the shell game (which, like the three-card monte found on the street, is known as the game the suckers never win at), not the unbeatable poker hand.

Stronger Than the Nuts


Describing a game so very crooked that the live ones would find it harder to beat than the shell game. The nuts here refer to those used in the shell game (which, like the three-card monte found on the street, is known as the game the suckers never win at), not the unbeatable poker hand.

Structure


1) The makeup of a game, with respect to the size of antes, the betting limits, opening requirements, blinds, forced bets, and so on. 2) With respect to a tournament, the amount of money in tournament chips players start with, the rules for re-buys and add-ons, and the manner in which the blinds increase.

Structured


Used to apply to a certain betting structure in "flop" games such as hold'em. The typical definition of a structured game is a fixed amount for bets and raises before the flop and on the flop, and then twice that amount on the turn and river.

Structured Limit


Describing the betting structure of a limit game (as opposed to no limit), as, for example, a structured limit hold 'em game, in which bets are at one level before and on the flop, and twice that level on the turn and river, such as $15-$30 hold 'em. The term structured limit is usually used for stud and hold 'em games, while double limit is used for draw games.

Struggle


Stand pat. In a draw game, "I'll struggle," said at the time for the draw, means "I'll take no cards."

Strychnine.


In lowball, a straight 9.

Stu.


Two cards, please. (Heard in a draw game at the time of the draw.) Also, "Stew."

Stub


The un-dealt portion of the cards, sometimes also called the deck, stock, or talon.

Stuck


Slang for losing, often a substantial amount of money. Down a nontrivial amount of money, as in "he's stuck $800".

Stud


1) Any of several poker games in which some of each players' cards are exposed. 2) Usually short for seven card stud.

Stud Player


1) Someone who plays stud poker (usually exclusively, or in preference to other forms of poker). 2) In lowball, someone who regularly turns part of his hand face up (generally to coax another player into or out of a pot.

Stud Poker


A form of poker in which one or more cards are dealt to each player face down, followed by one up card, with a betting round, more up cards, with a betting round after each, and then, in seven-card stud, a final down card, and a final betting round. The forms are five-card stud and seven-card stud, and sometimes six-card stud. In home games, you can find other variants.

Stud-Horse Poker


Supposedly an early form of stud poker, but, in fact, a game that no one really knows how to play. A portion of the California Constitution (Section 330) legislates against certain games of chance by name, including roulette, blackjack, something called lansquenet, and, notably, stud-horse poker. Even though attorneys-general of the state had no idea what the game was, they used that apparent ban for a long time to prevent the playing of any form of poker that was not draw. Some historians think stud-horse poker was a variant of three-card monte, that is, a sucker game in which the sucker had no chance. Eventually the government quit prosecuting clubs in which hold 'em was played, because judges ruled it was not stud. Once the "door was opened," other games were permitted, including stud, and even games like super pan 9, California aces, and 21st Century Blackjack that clearly bear little resemblance to poker. And nobody knows yet what stud-horse poker is.

Study


1) Regard your cards intently while trying to make up your mind what to do next. 2) Regard an opponent intently in an attempt to divine what cards the opponent has.

Substitute


Replace a card in stud, that is, receive a twist.

Substitution


In stud, played in a home game, an extra card that a player can "buy" after all the cards that constitute a hand have been dealt. This card is generally a replacement for one of the player's existing cards, usually with an up card being replaced by an up card, and a down card being replaced by a down card, and often with the player having to pay for the card, that is, put extra chips in the pot, such chips not constituting a bet, because that "bet" does not have to be matched by other players. "We're playing five-card stud, high-low, with a twist." Also called discard, optional card, pitch, replacement, twist.

Substitution Poker


Stud poker played with a twist (an extra card that a player can "buy" after all the cards that constitute a hand have been dealt.).

Subway Dealer


Bottom dealer (A cheat who deals cards from the bottom of the deck. Also sometimes called b-dealer, or cellar dealer.).

Suck


Draw cards. "How many cards do you want?" "I'll suck two."

Suck Out


To win a hand by virtue of hitting a very weak draw, often with poor pot odds.

Sucker


Live one; a rich loser; any loser or poor player.

Suction


In a big bet game, a small bet on a good hand to entice players to make an easy call, or better, to raise (so the suction bettor can re-raise).

Suction Bet


In a big bet game, a small bet on a good hand to entice players to make an easy call, or better, to raise (so the suction bettor can re-raise).

Sudden Death


Five-card stud played for low. So called because catching a pair usually kills a player's hand.

Suicide King


King of Hearts. So named because in the drawing the king appears to be stabbing himself in the head.

Suit


Clubs, diamonds, hearts, spades.

Suit Mark


The single spade, heart, club, or diamond beneath the index. (Some say that the suit mark is part of the index)

Suit System


A method of marking the backs of cards by indicating their suits.

Suited


Two or more cards all the same suit.

Suited Connectors


In hold 'em, two cards in sequence and in the same suit, usually with reference to hole cards.

Summertime Hand


A better-than-average hand, one likely to win the pot, but one that is not quite a strong hand.

Sunning a Deck


A form of cheating, a method of marking certain cards by leaving them in the sun for a period of time, which causes their backs either to lighten or darken

Super Satellite


A special tournament whose prize is usually a buy-in for a larger tournament. One-table satellites usually have just one winner; sometimes second place is awarded a free entry to another tournament. In larger satellite tournaments, the winner may get entry to the larger tournament, round-trip airfare plus accommodations (if the satellite takes place in a city other than that of the larger tournament), plus some percentage of the excess cash accumulated in buy-ins and re-buys. Second, third, and sometimes other places also can win a percentage of this cash. A satellite tournament with a large number of entrants, awarding entry or entries to major tournaments, is called a super satellite.

Super-Bluff


A successful bluff against the holder of a strong hand.

Super-Full


Four of a kind (obsolete).

Survival Mode


In a tournament, just trying to hang on till the limits go up, or avoid being busted before someone else, for the sake of making it to the final table or be among those who receive a payout. This is a no aggressive strategy some use to try to be among the winners of a tournament

Svengali Deck


A machine-made deck that contains marked cards, shaved cards, cards made up of pieces of other cards for certain effects, etc. Such decks are sold at magic supply outlets, supposedly for entertainment, and are indeed used by magicians to perform tricks, but they are also used by thieves to introduce into card games.

Sweat


1) Take a long time to look at your cards, often by squeezing; often followed by a or the hand or cards. "Will you hurry up? We're paying time!" "Hold on, this is an important pot; I gotta sweat these cards." 2) Kibitz (Watch someone play, or stand and watch a game, often from the rail.). "Aren't ya ready to leave yet?" "Hold on, I wanna sweat this game a few more minutes." 3) Win by careful play, avoiding taking risks.

Sweat Out


Sweat (Take a long time to look at your cards, often by squeezing; often followed by a or the hand or cards. "Will you hurry up? We're paying time!" "Hold on, this is an important pot; I gotta sweat these cards."). "Will you hurry up? We're paying time!" "Hold on, this is an important pot; I gotta sweat out this hand."

Sweater


Kibitzer; sometimes in particular someone who, in a tournament, stands on the rail and closely follows the play of one particular player, perhaps because of having a financial interest in, or being married to, the significant other of, or a friend of, that player

Sweep


Scoop (Win all of the pot in a high-low poker game that does not have a declare by having both the highest and the lowest hand.)

Sweeper


1) A hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot. 2) The player holding the hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot. 3) The player who declares both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare. Also called scooper.

Sweeping Hand


A hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot.

Sweeten


Add money (sometimes just in the form of antes) to a pot.

Sweeten the Pot


1) Raise. "Let's sweeten the pot a little" means "I'm going to raise," and, in a no-limit game, generally portends a large raise.2) Ante again after an unopened deal in any game with opening requirements, as jacks or better. This phrase is more commonly heard in home games than in card rooms.

Swing


1) Declare both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare. 2) Win both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare. (Just because you declare both ways does not necessarily mean you'll win both ways.) 3) Win all of the pot in a high-low poker game that does not have a declare, by having the best hand for one way and no one has qualifiers for the other way.

Swing Hand


A hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot.

Swing Shift


One of the three shifts in a 24-hour card room or casino, the shift between day and graveyard. Swing shift usually starts anywhere between 6 pm and 8 p.m. and ends eight hours later.

Swinger


1) A hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot. 2) The player holding the hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot. 3) The player who declares both ways in a high-low poker game that has a declare.

Switch


Substitute dishonest cards for honest ones, as, for example, bring in a marked or stacked deck. Also, bring in a deck.

Switch Man


A person who introduces a dishonest deck into a game, surreptitiously replacing an honest deck.

T


Abbreviation for a 10, usually found only in written text about cards.

Tab


Tab card.

Tab Card


A credit account available in some clubs to favored customers (generally those on whom a credit check has been run), to which a player can charge chips to play on. This is a convenient means for a player to get around the difficulty of carrying large amounts of cash on his person. The tab card is usually kept track of on a ledger card with transactions initialed by the player or a house official or both. The cashier is usually responsible for keeping the records straight. In most clubs, a player is supposed to leave a check for the amount charged at the end of a playing session if he does not cash in as much as he charged. Frequently a player with charging privileges does so against a blank, signed check. If he loses, he fills out the check for the proper amount; if he wins, the blank check remains attached to his tab card, to be used the next time. When such a player calls for chips at the table, he usually fills out a charge slip, called a ticket, for the amount requested.

Table


1) A poker table. 2) Any surface on which players play poker (such as a kitchen table). 3) A complete poker game, players and all. "Seat open on table four." 4) Figuratively, the players in a particular game. "The table took a break." 5) The board, that is, the up cards of all players.

Table Captain


A humorous name for the player who takes it upon himself to arbitrate in all matters requiring decisions, settle all disputes, and interpret all rules. Such a role is generally only required in a private game, because most card room games are dealt by house dealers; even where they are not, usually a floor person is available to make decisions. Nonetheless, someone often takes it upon himself to arbitrate every decision even in a card room, and the other players call him the table captain.

Table Cards


1) Community cards. 2) Spread one's cards on the table (as opposed to discarding them or holding them in one's hand off the table) at showdown time for all to see; usually rendered table one's [your, my, etc.] cards. Some clubs require the winning hand to be tabled. Some sometimes rule that if a hand is tabled and then thrown away and the pot inadvertently awarded to a lesser hand, and it is discovered later that the best hand was actually tabled, that the pot should be awarded to that hand even if it is no longer technically live.

Table Change


If you're playing at a public card room, and you'd like to play at a table other than the one you're currently at, you can ask the floor for a table change. Different card rooms handle this differently, but typically you'll be moved as soon as an opening develops, and a player from the seating list will be moved into your seat.

Table Charge


A portion of each pot taken by the house, for the purpose of paying expenses and making a profit. Also, rake.

Table Cop


A player who calls with the intention of keeping other players honest (e.g., to snap off bluffs) is said to be playing table cop. Also a player who makes an effort to point out violations (significant and otherwise) of casino rules (e.g., reminding other players to act in turn, which is properly the responsibility of the dealer).

Table Fee


An amount of money collected either on the button or every half hour by the card room. This is another way for the house to make its money.

Table Holdout


A holdout machine, a spring or clip attached to the underside of a table to hold one or more cards until the thief who put them there can retrieve them for reintroduction into the game for cheating purposes.

Table Stakes


1) Table stakes is simply the (nearly universal) rule that a player may only wager money they have on the table at the beginning of a hand. Usually it also implies that money may not be removed from the table at any time (exceptions are made for tipping), although money may be added to one's stacks between hands. A player who goes all-in at a table stakes game may not continue to bet, and is eligible only for the main pot. 2) Sometimes "table stakes" also implies no-limit play.

Table Stakes Limit


The original term for what is now usually called table stakes

Table Talk


Any discussion at the table of the hand currently underway, especially by players not involved in the pot, and especially any talk that might affect play. Depending on the nature of the discussion, table talk is often considered somewhere between rude and an act of war. The most common example of table talk to be avoided is announcing what cards you've folded.

Tahoe


A variant of pineapple in which players do not discard any of their three down cards. At the showdown, players can use none, one, or two of their down cards (but not three) to form their best five-card hand in combination with the five community cards. When played high-low split, a different set of cards can be used for each direction, but no more than two for either direction. Also called lazy pineapple.

Tahoe High-Low


Tahoe pineapple, played high-low split.

Tahoe Pineapple


A variant of pineapple in which players do not discard any of their three down cards. At the showdown, players can use none, one, or two of their down cards (but not three) to form their best five-card hand in combination with the five community cards. When played high-low split, a different set of cards can be used for each direction, but no more than two for either direction. Also called lazy pineapple.

Tahoe Split


A poker game, seven-card stud high-low split, with an 8 qualifier for low.

Take a Bath


Lose heavily.

Take a Shot


1) Use an angle (Any technically legal but ethically dubious way to increase your expectation at a game; a trick.).2) Look for a chance to play. "I'd sure like to take a shot in that game." 3) Make a cheating move. "He has to get a little booze in him before he takes a shot."

Take Care of


Toke, that is, tip the dealer, often implying with a good tip. If you win a big pot, you want to take care of the dealer

Take it in the Middle


Sit down at the precise moment it is your turn to put in the middle blind. Some clubs do not let a new player (new to the particular game) be dealt in until it is his turn to put in a blind, supposedly to prevent his getting any "free" hands. Some clubs permit a player to receive his first hand, if he is too late to get the big blind, in the middle position. In such case, the player must in the next three hands still put in an amount equal to how much he would put in if he sat through all three blinds. This requires putting in the dealer's blind when the deal is one position to his left, so that the dealer does not end up having to put too much in. Also, when the player takes it in the middle, the player to his left puts in an amount equal to that of what the middle blind ordinarily is. To take the middle blind is also called come in in the middle.

Take it or Leave it


A form of five-card stud, found only in home games, a high-low game in which, after each player has been dealt one down card, each player gets a choice, in order, on each succeeding card. When each player has one down card, there is a betting round. The dealer then offers a card off the deck to the first player. If the player wants that card, he keeps it. If he does not want it, he immediately gets the next card off the deck, and the first card is offered to the second player, who has the same options. He can take the card, or immediately get the next card off the deck, in which case that card is offered to the third player, and so on. This continues until everyone has one up card, at which point there is a second round of betting. Any card that goes all the way around the table without stopping at anyone, including the dealer, becomes dead. After the betting has been equalized, the operation starts all over, with a card being offered in turn to each player. After each time of each player having the same number of upwards another round of betting comes. After each player has four upwards, each player has the opportunity of replacing an upward with an upward, or the down card with another down card (the twist), followed again, of course, by another round of betting, and then a declaration, and then the determination of the two winners. This game is sometimes called take it or leave it, shove 'em along, or push. It is also sometimes called pass the trash, although that name is more often reserved for Anaconda.

Take Off a Card


To call a single bet in order to see one more card.

Take Off the Gloves


To use an aggressive betting strategy to bully opponents.

Take the Lead


1) Bet or raise, generally when passed to, or sometimes in an aggressive fashion. 2) Make the first voluntary bet in any round.

Take the Middle Blind


Sit down at the precise moment it is your turn to put in the middle blind. Some clubs do not let a new player (new to the particular game) be dealt in until it is his turn to put in a blind, supposedly to prevent his getting any "free" hands. Some clubs permit a player to receive his first hand, if he is too late to get the big blind, in the middle position. In such case, the player must in the next three hands still put in an amount equal to how much he would put in if he sat through all three blinds. This requires putting in the dealer's blind when the deal is one position to his left, so that the dealer does not end up having to put too much in. Also, when the player takes it in the middle, the player to his left puts in an amount equal to that of what the middle blind ordinarily is. To take the middle blind is also called come in in the middle.

Take the Odds


1) To wager less money on a proposition than you hope to win. 2) In no-limit games, to wager all of one's money in one bet.

Take the Worst of it


Fighting the odds; usually preceded by take the or have the; a situation in which a wager has an unfavorable return. Opposite of best of it.

Takeout


The minimum buy-in required for a particular game.

Talking Chips


Winnings. That is, winners can afford to waste time gabbing, while the losers want to concentrate on playing. "He's got talking chips" means he's winning. Also called lobbying chips, walking chips.

Tall Pot


A large pot waiting to be won by someone; a large stack of chips in the center of the table, caused by excessive betting, that will look nice added to the stack of whoever wins it.

Talon


The un-dealt portion of the cards, sometimes also called the deck, stock, or stub.

Tap


Go all in, that is, bet all one's chips. Usually called tap off.

Tap City


To go broke.

Tap Off


Bet all your chips, or all the other guy's.

Tap Out


To bet all one's chips.

Tap Someone


In a no-limit game, bet all the other guy's chips. "I'll tap you" means I'm betting all you've got on the table, and you must either fold or put all your chips in the pot.

Tap you.


In a no-limit game, this means, "I bet all your chips."

Tapioca.


1) "I'm tapping off," that is, betting all my chips. 2) Broke.

Tapoff


A bet of all your chips, or all the other guy's

Tap-Off


A bet of all your chips, or all the other guy's; usually followed by bet

Tapped


Broke.

Tapped Out


Out of money. Can refer to a player running out of money in the course of a hand, thus still active for the main pot; or can refer to a player who has lost his bankroll and can no longer play.

TC


Tournament chips, usually found only in written text about cards. "We started with 1000TC."

Telegraph


1) A wire or string used by thieves to signal each other.

Telephone


A form of poker found only in home games, a widow game in which each player receives five cards face down, as does a central area of the table, followed by a round of betting, and then the dealer turns up each central card, one at a time, each followed by another round of betting. At the showdown, each player uses the best five cards among his five and those of the widow, and the lowest card in the player's hand is wild. The game is similar to Cincinnati, the difference being that in the latter the lowest card in the widow is wild, as well as any card of equal rank in a player's hand.

Tell


Any personal mannerisms that reveal the quality of one's hand. E.g., constantly looking at one's hole cards is often a tell of a poor hand. (Some players, knowing this, will at times check their hole cards when they have a great hand and don't need to look.). You might unconsciously play with your chips every time you bluff. Or you might notice that another player blinks a lot whenever he has a strong hand.

Tender Hand


A hand a player is wary or afraid of betting, one that is a favorite on the pot, but vulnerable to a raise, such as, after the draw, a rough 8 in lowball or two medium pairs in high draw.

Tennessee


1) In low poker, a hand topped by a 10.2) A form of poker found only in home games, a widow game in which each player receives five cards face down, and then the dealer turns up a card from the deck, one at a time, each followed by another round of betting, until five are in the center. At the showdown, each player uses the best five cards among his five and those of the widow. The game is often played high-low split. The game is nearly identical to Cincinnati, except in the latter the five widow cards are dealt face down at once, and then turned up one at a time

Tennessee Toddy


In low poker, a hand topped by a 10.

Tension


1) In low poker, a hand topped by a 10. Should probably be spelled "'ten-SHUN," because it imitates the military command "Attention!" 2) Two or more 10s.

Terce


Three cards to a straight flush. Also called tierce.

Terce Major


The three top cards to an ace-high straight flush, that is, A-K-Q in the same suit. Also called tierce major.

Texas Holdem


Texas Hold'em (or just "hold'em") is a poker game in which each player gets two pocket cards, while five community cards are dealt face-up on the table. The strength of a player's hand is the best hand that can be made with these seven cards. There is a round of betting after the pocket cards are dealt, after the first three community cards (the flop), after the fourth, or turn card, and after the final, or river card.

Texas Tech


A form of poker, a cross between draw and stud. Each player starts with three cards; there is a round of betting; each player receives another card; another round of betting; each player receives a fifth card; another round of betting; then each player draws cards as in draw poker; then each player exposes one card; another round of betting; further cards are exposed, each followed by a round of betting, until each player has but one card face down. The game is played high-low split, and, prior to the showdown, there is a chip declaration. This game has eight rounds of betting, or nine if there is a bet after the declare, and is generally played only in home games. It is sometimes called Double-barreled shotgun or Wild Annie.

The Book


"The book" is a mythical set of instructions supposedly containing the poker wisdom of the ages. A player speaks of "playing by the book," by which he means he is playing a hand the way he thinks it is supposed to be played; such players usually think "playing by the book" is equivalent to playing tight. Actually, there is no book.

There


1) Having made a hand; used among thieves, in particular players who cheat by signaling each other the contents of the hands of opponents. "He's there," a seemingly innocent remark, might be an announcement by one such scammer to his partner that the person they're trying to beat (and whose hand the former caught a glimpse of) has made his hand or has a hand better than the one of the second scammer. 2) Making the hand, or catching the required card. "How come it's never there?" is an oft-heard remark by a self-pitying player who thinks he never makes a hand when it counts.

There is Work Down.


The remark by one thief to another that the game in which they are has crooked cards, in the form of, for example, a marked deck.

Thief


A cheat, usually a mechanic (card manipulator) or scammer.

Third Base


The position to the right of the house dealer in a poker game or at a blackjack table

Third Hand


The player three positions to the left of the dealer, usually the first to bet in a blind and straddle game and many three-blind games.

Third Man Walking Rule


In a public card room, once two people have gotten up from a game (and left their chips, so that they remain part of the game) for whatever reason, the next person to get up is given a button by the house dealer and informed that he must return before his next blind or he will be picked up. This rule helps to keep games full, keeps them from breaking up, and yet still allows the third player time enough to make a quick restroom trip or take a smoke break.

Third Nuts


In hold 'em, having the third-best possible hand for the situation, or, the actual third-best hand in such a situation.

Third Pair


In hold 'em, forming a pair that consists of one of your hole cards matching the third-highest card on the board.

Third Person Walking Rule


In a public card room, once two people have gotten up from a game (and left their chips, so that they remain part of the game) for whatever reason, the next person to get up is given a button by the house dealer and informed that he must return before his next blind or he will be picked up. This rule helps to keep games full, keeps them from breaking up, and yet still allows the third player time enough to make a quick restroom trip or take a smoke break.

Third Street


In Stud games, the first round of betting on the first three cards.

Three


A hand that needs three cards. ; usually preceded by the. "Check to the three."

Three Deuces


Apart from the hand you would expect, three 2s plus two other unrelated cards, draw players sometimes refer to the specific two-pair hand A-A-K-K-Q as three deuces, probably because the hand is very close to that.

Three Fates


Three queens.

Three Flush


Three cards of the same suit, requiring two more to make a flush.

Three of a Kind


Three cards of the same rank. Also called trips.

Three Pluck One


A cheating scheme with three thieves working together against one victim.

Three-Bet


Raise a raise, that is put in the third bet; often followed by the name of a person. "He opened, I raised, and he three-bet me." "I opened, Sue raised, and Willie three-bet the pot."

Three-Blind Traveling Blind Game


A traveling blind game with three mandatory blinds: dealer blind, put in by the dealer, middle blind, put in by the player to the left of the dealer, and big blind, put in by the player two positions to the left of the dealer.

Three-Card Draw


A hand that needs three cards.

Three-Card Hop


Remarkable draw; usually part of the phrase, two-card hop or three-card hop. "I thought I had a lock on the pot with a pat 7, but he made a three-card hop on me" means another pat hand just got beat by a three-card draw. Also called cathop.

Three-Card Monte


1) Any card game played with three cards, particularly poker. 2) A con game involving three cards and slSeven-of-hand, and that has nothing to do with poker.

Three-Card Poker


Any poker game played with three cards. Sometimes called three-toed Pete.

Three-for-Two


In lowball, a proposition that one player will call the bet or raise and draw three cards if the raiser agrees to draw two.

Threes


In high, Three of a kind.

Three-Thirty-Three


A stud game (sort of), played only in home games, in which each player is dealt a down card, followed by a round of betting, and then one or more cards face up. Aces have a value of 1 or 11, face cards a value of , and all other cards have face value. This is a split-pot game, with the object being to end up with a total closest to 3 or 33. On each round, players can either receive a further up card, or refuse further cards. After any round in which no player takes a card, the players declare which "way" they are going (3 or 33, sometimes called high or low), and there is a showdown. (Sometimes there is one more round of betting before the showdown.) In some versions, once a player refuses up cards a certain number of times (say, three), that player can no longer request further cards. The purpose of this rule is that when a player is in a "lock" (cannot lose) situation, that is, when he is the only one going low, and there are more than one player going high and who have quit asking for up cards, the player with the lock can prolong the betting by drawing cards to a point at which he cannot hit without destroying his lock. In some games, being on one side or the other of 3 or 33 (when no one has exactly that total) wins over the other side.

Three-Toed Pete


Any poker game played with three cards. Also called three-card Poker.

Threshold of Pain


A point of losing beyond which it no longer hurts to lose any more.

Throw


1) Discard. (Throw one or more cards from your hand.) "What card did you throw?" 2) Put chips in a pot; usually followed by chips.

Throw a Party


Lose heavily, generally caused by playing much too liberally. The implication is that the party is being thrown for the other players.

Throw Off


1) Gamble away; sometimes followed by something. If someone asks you to throw off something, he wants you to gamble it up, that is, play looser. 2) Discard (In a draw game, a card that was thrown away by a player, to be replaced by another card. ).

Throwing a Party


When several loose or amateur players are making significant monetary contributions to the pot.

Ticket


1) A card. In a draw game, a player might say to the dealer, "Give me a ticket." 2) Charge slip, which a player fills out and gets chips, which are charged against a tab card. In a card room in which such are used, a player might yell, after going broke, "Bring me a hundred on a ticket."

Tickets


Cards. In a draw game, when the dealer asks, "Tickets?", he wants to know how many cards you are drawing. If you say to the winner of the pot, "Nice tickets," you are complimenting him on the quality of his hand. (This is sometimes said facetiously about a very poor hand.)

Tickle


Raise. "I'll give it a tickle."

Tied on


Unable to throw a hand away. "Too much money in the pot; you got me locked on." Also, locked on. "Too much money in the pot; you got me tied on."

Tiempo.


1) The verbal request by a house employee for the players to pay their time. 2) A request by a player for more time to consider his cards.

Tierce


Three cards to a straight flush. Also called terce.

Tierce Major


The three top cards to an ace-high straight flush, that is, A-K-Q in the same suit. Also called terce major.

Tiger


A nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, five cards 3 to 9 with no pair (in some circles, 3 to 8 with no pair), ranks above a big dog, and below a big tiger. Also called little cat. Sometimes the term refers to any of the hands big cat, big tiger, little cat, or little tiger.

Tight


Playing tight simply means playing fewer hands and folding them earlier. In essence, tight with your cash. A tight table is a table dominated by tight players. Tightness is frequently described as a good thing, and especially at low levels of play can be a big advantage over players who will always pay you off. Many good players recommend a tight aggressive strategy.

Tight Game


A game with a small number of players in most pots.

Tight Hold 'em


Another name for Omaha.

Tight Play


Pertaining to the play of a tight player.

Tight Player


One who plays tight, that is, bets only when holding a strong hand

Tightass


Tight player.

Tighten Up


Play tighter or more conservatively.

Tilt


To play wildly or recklessly. Good players are often tempted to do things they know are bad ideas when they get frustrated, angry, or upset for any reason. They go "on tilt." Typical tilt play is much too loose and often very aggressive, because a player on tilt wants very badly to win a pot, and is not rational enough to wait for cards that are worth playing or situations that are worth attacking.

Timber


The discards; used cards out of play. "Push the deadwood. It's my turn to deal." Sometimes called deadwood.

Time


1) A request by a player to suspend play while he decides what he's going to do. Simply, "Time please!" If a player doesn't request time and there is a substantial amount of action behind him, the dealer may rule that the player has folded. 2) An amount of money collected either on the button or every half hour by the card room. This is another way for the house to make its money.

Time Buy-in


A game in which the house makes its money by charging time (as opposed to a rake game).

Time Charge


If the house doesn't drop from the pot but instead collects money from each player periodically, this is called a time charge, or a seat charge, and you're said to be "paying time" to play.

Time Collection


An amount of money collected either on the button or every half hour by the card room. This is another way for the house to make its money.

Time Collector


A card-room employee who circulates throughout the club either picking up time from each player or getting it from the house dealer (who has previously collected from each player).

Time Cut


The fee charged in a time game.

Time Game


A game in which the house makes its money by charging time (as opposed to a rake game).

Tip


Gambling term for "toke", as in "Tip the cocktail waitress". Comes from the term "Token of appreciation". A small amount of money (typically $.50 or $1.00) is given to the dealer by the winner of a pot. Quite often, tokes represent the great majority of a dealer's income.

Tip the Duke


1) Give away one's holdings, by one's actions or some other tell. 2) Cheat by signaling to an accomplice the value of a down card or of the holdings of another player.

Tip the Hand


1) Give away one's holdings, by one's actions or some other tell. 2) Cheat by signaling to an accomplice the value of a down card or of the holdings of another player.

Tip the Mitt


1) Give away one's holdings, by one's actions or some other tell. 2) Cheat by signaling to an accomplice the value of a down card or of the holdings of another player.

To go


The current betting level (amount it takes to enter the pot), as in "$20 to go" meaning every player must contribute $20 (total) or drop. A $10 raise would then make the pot "$30 to go".

Toad in the Hole


A form of spit in the ocean, in which one card is dealt face-up in the center, which rank is then wild in anyone's hand, but which card is not part of anyone's hand. Also called pig in the poke, wild widow..

TOC


Tournament of Champions, one of the two main tournaments recognizable only by their initials. (The other is the WSOP.)

Toilet Flush


Missed flush draw, that is, in a draw game having drawn one card to a flush and ended up with the same thing, four cards to a flush and nothing else. "I've got a flush." "Oh yeah? Well I've got a toilet flush

Toke


Gambling term for "tip", as in "Toke the cocktail waitress". Comes from the term "Token of appreciation". A small amount of money (typically $.50 or $1.00) is given to the dealer by the winner of a pot. Quite often, tokes represent the great majority of a dealer's income.

Token


A Chip.

Tom


Poor, bad, unfavorable. "Don't get in there; it's a Tom game." Opposite of George.

Tommer


A bad situation or player. "Lost your last hundred, huh? That's a real tommer!"

Tonk


In lowball, 50 points (sometimes 49); from the game of that name. This is an unplayable hand, and "criers" like to demonstrate their saltiness by showing all the poor hands, so they don't miss the opportunity of saying, "Tonk," and showing their 50-point hands.

Tool


Any mechanical cheating device. Also called work.

Top and Bottoms


Two pair, aces and deuces.

Top Card


1) In lowball, the highest card in a hand; in high, the highest card in a flush or straight. 2) The first card off the deck.

Top Hand


Winning hand.

Top Kicker


When two or more players have identical hands at the showdown, the situation in which the pot is won by the player with the highest side card.

Top Pair


In flop games, having a hole card that matches the highest card on the board.

Top Stock


A small packet of prearranged cards placed on top of the deck prior to dealing (sometimes arranged by a slSeven-of-hand maneuver such as a false shuffle), such that specific hands go to predetermined players, usually a good hand to the "sucker" and a better hand to the thief or his confederate.

Top the Deck


Palm cards from the top of the deck.

Top Two Pair


In flop games, having hole cards that make the highest possible two pair hand.

Top-Card Draw


A method of determining, at the start of a new game, who deals the first hand. Each player draws a card from the deck, which is often fanned face down on the table, and the holder of the highest card deals; often suits are used to break ties (in bridge order); sometimes ties are broken by the winner being the first person to draw that tying card. To participate in this is to draw for deal.

Topped Out


Pertaining to the situation in which a hand is beaten by one only slightly better. Also called edged, edged out, or shaved.

Tops and Bottoms


Two pair, aces and deuces.

Touching Cards


Cards in sequence, as part of a straight.

Tough


Solid, that is, conservative, not likely to get out of line; difficult to beat; good; said of someone's play or a player.

Tough Money


Money for living expenses, and not to be used for gambling.

Tough Player


A very good or successful poker player, often a professional.

Tough Spot


1) A difficult game to beat, particularly one in which it is hard to tell when others are bluffing. 2) A game in which it is difficult to bluff, as a limit game with small stakes. 3) A situation in which it is hard to tell what other active players are holding because not enough information has been revealed, either because of being first to bet, because other players may have checked good hands, or some other strategic reason. 4) A tough player, or the position occupied by same. "Watch out for seat four; that's a tough spot.

Toughy


A tough player (A very good or successful poker player, often a professional.).

Tourist


Someone who does not live in Las Vegas (and is presumed to be at a disadvantage in the poker games), as contrasted to a local (who "lives" in the poker games, and who supposes that the only purpose in life for tourists is to supply him with a living).

Tournament


The general idea behind poker tournaments is that a bunch of poker players sit down with the same number of chips, and eventually only one player has any chips left at the end. In order to ensure that the event will finish in reasonable time, tournaments institute a schedule by which the blinds and/or antes increase. Tournaments are usually played with chips that have no value outside of the tournament. The winner of a tournament (the last player to bust out) as well as several of the other top finishers are typically awarded prize money according to some predetermined schedule.

Tournament Circuit


The yearly cycle of major poker tournaments, including, of course, the World Series of Poker and the Tournament of Champions, but also including others such as the National Championship of Poker at Hollywood Park Casino in Inglewood, California, and the Festival of Poker in London's Victoria Casino. Also called tournament trail.

Tournament of Champions


A prestigious tournament on the tournament trail, first held in August, 1999, at the Orleans in Las Vegas, in which only winners of major tournaments are eligible to compete. Sometimes rendered as the acronym TOC.

Tournament Trail


The yearly cycle of major poker tournaments, including, of course, the World Series of Poker and the Tournament of Champions, but also including others such as the National Championship of Poker at Hollywood Park Casino in Inglewood, California, and the Festival of Poker in London's Victoria Casino. Also called tournament circuit.

Tourney


Tournament.

Trade


Receive a twist (In stud, played in a home game, an extra card that a player can "buy" after all the cards that constitute a hand have been dealt.).

Trail


Come in light, that is, call a bet when several others have already called, usually to get money odds on a straight or flush draw (in high), or to try a long shot cheaply, as a cat hop or short pair draw in high draw, a multiple-card draw in lowball, or an inside straight draw in hold 'em or seven stud, or substandard starting cards in either of the latter games.

Trap


1) The state of being stuck; usually preceded by the. "I was stuck a hunnert, but I got out of the trap." 2) The setting up of a situation in which one player can catch or trap another3) To check initially, then raise a bet made later on in the same betting round. Frequently a sign of strength, but may be a bluff. 4) Catch one or more players when you have a good hand by playing in such a way as to conceal your holdings: checking or under betting a good hand, or playing a hand in such a way as not to let opponents know you have a strong hand, thus inducing them either to try a bluff, or bet a weak hand they might otherwise just show down without betting. 5) Money is trapped in the pot if it faces the imminent danger of becoming dead money. Typically you're trapped if after putting some money in the pot you're faced with the proposition of calling a raise in order to continue, especially an uncomfortably large raise. 6) A player is also said to be trapped if caught calling (e.g. on a draw) between two other players who keep raising and re-raising each other.

Trapper


One who plays a hand in the way described under trap. After this happens (and sometimes happens unsuccessfully, as all the players just show down their hands without betting, and the first player reveals that he passed a "monster"), someone is sure to say, "Not all trappers wear fur hats."

Trash


1) Poor or worthless cards. 2) To discard a hand; also the discard pile in which all cards are dead.

Traveling Blind


A mandatory blind, dependent on position, as described under traveling blind game. Examples are under-the-gun blind, open blind, and so on.

Traveling Blind Game


A game with mandatory blinds, dependent on position, rather than on who won the last pot, or how many times a particular player has or has not blinded.

Tray


A box, or tray, that has indentations to neatly hold chips in (often five) stacks.

Treedlededee.


"Three cards, please." This is heard at the time of the draw in a draw poker game.

Trele-Header


The third pot of three in which the first two have not been played, either because of no player having had openers in a game with opening requirements, or because of two successive misdeals.

Trey


1) 3 (the card). 2) Divide a deck into thirds prior to shuffling. (This is an old, obsolete term.)

Treys Full


A full house consisting of three 3s and another pair.

Treys Over


1) Two pair, 3s and deuces. 2) A full house consisting of three 3s and another pair.

Treys Up


Two pair, 3s and deuces.

Trick


Poor player; from pimp slang.

Tricon


Three of a kind.

Trim


Trim the sides of cards, to make them thinner so as to be easily detected by a thief.

Trimming Shears


Special heavy scissors for cutting the edges of cards in any of several ways for cheating. These produce various kinds of strippers, such as belly strippers, end strippers, low belly strippers, and high belly strippers.

Trims


A deck marked by shaving the edges of some cards such that a thief can tell by feel the values of certain cards.

Trio


Three of a kind.

Trip


Three of a kind.

Trip Up


Three of a kind. In Hold'em the term SET is used when two of the three cards are hole cards.

Triple Ante


In double-limit draw (high, with an ante), pertaining to the situation following two passed pots (that is, unopened pots;), at which point the pot contains three antes from each player, and the limits double (once only) until a pot is played.

Triple Jackpot


A period of time in a card room that has progressive jackpots for getting certain hands beat (for example, aces full in a hold 'em game) during which the posted payouts are tripled. Usually triple jackpot times are at times that otherwise have lower attendance than others, with such promotions being to increase patronage.

Triple Through


Triple a small stack by beating two others, generally those with larger stack; sometimes part of the phrase triple a stack through. "Big John and Bubbles each had about $10,000 in chips, and they were both hot and stuck. Sally came in with $100, tripled it through them twice, and took the $900 to the window."

Triple Tough


Extremely tough.

Triple-Draw Lowball


A form of ace-to-five with three draws, instead of the usual one in ordinary lowball, and thus having four betting rounds, usually played pot limit.

Triple-Threat Player


Someone who plays all games (all variations of poker) well.

Triplets


Three of a kind. Often called trips.

Trips


Three of a kind; shortened from triplets.

Trips Eight


1) A form of draw poker found only in home games, a split-pot (high-low) game with qualifiers of three of a kind for high and an 8 for low (see 8-or-better). 2) A form of stud poker with the same qualifiers, often played with one or more twists at the end.

Trombones


1) In lowball, a 7-6 hand; comes from the song "76 Trombones." 2) In high, two pair, 7s and 6s. 3) In hold 'em, a 7 and 6 as one's first two cards.

Tulsa


A variant of hold 'em, usually played only in private games, in which the community cards are turned face up one at a time, thus adding two more rounds of betting.

Tuna


Live one; a rich loser; any loser or poor player.

Tupper


Two pair.

Tupperware


Two pair.

Turkey


Live one; a rich loser; any loser or poor player.

Turn


1) The fourth of five community cards in flop games (e.g. hold'em and omaha). Sometimes called fourth street. 2) With respect to a particular player, the point at which the action is on him, that is, the time when a player is faced with the choice of folding, calling, or raising. "Whose turn is it?" 3) Sometimes (rarely, these days) the term is used by Texans and others from the Southwest with the same meaning as flop.

Turn a Draw


In hold 'em, make a five-card (that is, complete) hand, generally a straight or flush, on the turn card.

Turn a Pair


In hold 'em, pair one of one's hole cards on the turn card.

Turn Card


1) In hold 'em-type games, the second card of the flop (that is, the fourth card dealt to the center). Following this card is the second round of betting. This card is sometimes (rarely) called sixth street. 2) In seven-card stud, the fourth card dealt to each player. Following this card is the second round of betting

Turn Down


Fold (a hand).

Turn One.


When everyone passes in a hold 'em game, the last player may say this to the dealer indicating that he, too, does not wish to bet.

Turn Out


Teach someone how to cheat. "He should be good; he was turned out by One-Eyed Charlie." Probably comes from the world of prostitution, where the process of starting a beginner on the tortuous road of sin, usually by a pimp, is called the same thing.

Twiggy


In hold 'em, 2-9 as one's first two cards. Probably comes from this erstwhile ultra skinny model's measurements

Twin Beds


A form of poker found only in home games, a widow game in which each player receives five cards face down, and 10 cards are arranged face down in the center of the table, in two rows of five each, at which point there is a betting round, and then the dealer turns up each central card, one at a time, usually alternating one from each row, each followed by another round of betting. At the showdown, each player uses the best five cards among his five and five from one row (only) of the widow. The game is often played high-low split

Twist


In stud, played in a home game, an extra card that a player can "buy" after all the cards that constitute a hand have been dealt. This card is generally a replacement for one of the player's existing cards, usually with an up card being replaced by an up card, and a down card being replaced by a down card, and often with the player having to pay for the card, that is, put extra chips in the pot, such chips not constituting a bet, because that "bet" does not have to be matched by other players. "We're playing five-card stud, high-low, with a twist." Also called discard, optional card, pitch, replacement, substitution.

Two


A hand that needs two cards; usually preceded by the. "Check to the two."

Two Bets.


Usually means, "I raise," in the sense that when a player says this, it's his turn to call one bet, but by putting in two, he is indicating a raise. The phrase is most common in limit games, but is also heard in no-limit and pot-limit games to indicate a raise exactly equal in size to the preceding bet.

Two Bits


$25 or a $25 chip. More commonly called quarter.

Two Flush


Two cards of the same suit, requiring three more to make a flush.

Two in Pan


In draw (or lowball), an announcement that you have A-2-3 or J-Q-K of spades (which are worth a collection of two in panguingue). Usually the announcer shows the cards in question and then throws the hand away.

Two of Three


This is a pot building game. It plays just like Seven Card Stud except that in order to win the game you must have two out of the three of the following: lowest spade in the hole, highest spade in the hole, and best poker hand. You cannot use the same card for highest and lowest spade. If no one has this combination then the game is reset and starts over. This can go for a while and if you fold then you are out of the game! If you are dealt the deuce and ace of spades in the whole then you are guaranteed taking the pot, so bet heavy.

Two Pair


A hand consisting of two cards of one rank, and two cards of another rank (and an unpaired card).

Two-Bet


Raise, that is put in two bets; usually followed by the name of a person. "I opened and he two-bet me."

Two-Bit


1) Pertaining to $25, as a two-bit chip. 2) Pertaining to a small-limit game or player.

Two-Bit Game


A small game.

Two-Bit Player


A small-limit player; someone who plays only in the smallest games.

Two-Card


A form of poker, found exclusively in home games, in which each player receives one card face down, followed by a round of betting, another face up, with another round of betting, and then each active player has an optional replacement (as described under twist, but generally without having to pay for the card). The game is played high-low, with both the highest and lowest hand being two aces. Pairs win for high, followed by high-card combinations; that is, A-K ranks just below a pair of deuces. For low, the point total is used, with 2 being best, then 3; 4, next, can be formed in two ways, A-3 or a pair of deuces; and so on

Two-Card Draw


A hand that needs two cards.

Two-Card Hop


Remarkable draw; usually part of the phrase, two-card hop or three-card hop. "I thought I had a lock on the pot with a pat 7, but he made a three-card hop on me" means another pat hand just got beat by a three-card draw. Also called cat-hop.

Two-Card Party


In lowball, all players (usually implies at least three) draw two cards.

Two-Card Poker


Poker played with two cards, in particular two-card. Sometimes called Hurricane.

Two-for-One


An offer by one player to another to play under certain circumstances, usually more favorable to the other player, in exchange for calling a bet. Propositions are found mainly in no-limit lowball games.

Two-Gap


Describing hold 'em starting cards in which the two cards are three apart in rank.

Two-Handed


Pertaining to two players playing a game by themselves.

Two-Minute Rule


A house rule that a player must act on his hand within two minutes, or else give up the hand and have no claim on the pot. This rule is found mainly in no-limit games, and is usually invoked on players who frequently abuse the time limits, that is, when confronted with a large bet, often study the situation for long periods of time. The five-minute rule is similar, though not as common.

Two-Three


In lowball, an agreement between two players that when the two of them are the only ones to remain in an otherwise unopened pot (which might happen when one has the middle blind and the other the big blind), one will open blind for two bets, and the other will raise to three bets. At this point, the action will be on the first, the one who made the two bets, who can, of course, fold, call, or raise.

Two-Twenty-Two


A stud game (sort of), played only in home games, in which each player is dealt a down card, followed by a round of betting, and then one or more cards face up. Aces have a value of 1 or 11, face cards a value of , and all other cards have face value. This is a split-pot game, with the object being to end up with a total closest to 2 or 22. On each round, players can either receive a further up card, or refuse further cards. After any round in which no player takes a card, the players declare which "way" they are going (2 or 22, sometimes called high or low), and there is a showdown. (Sometimes there is one more round of betting before the showdown.) In some versions, once a player refuses up cards a certain number of times (say, three), that player can no longer request further cards. The purpose of this rule is that when a player is in a "lock" (cannot lose) situation, that is, when he is the only one going low, and there are more than one player going high, and who have quit asking for up cards, the player with the lock can prolong the betting by drawing cards to a point at which he cannot hit without destroying his lock. In some games, being on one side or the other of 2 or 22 (when no one has exactly that total) wins over the other side.

Two-Way Call


A hand that wins both ways in any high-low pot.

Two-Way Hand


1) In draw poker played with the 52-card deck, an open-ended straight; so called because it can be made by two ranks. 2) In draw poker, a hand with two possible ways of drawing, such as four cards to a straight or four to a flush (but not the same for both draws). 3) In lowball, an 8, 9, or 10 (that is, a hand topped by one of those cards) that can be broken under pressure. 9-4-3-2-A is a breaking hand, because you can throw the 9 and draw to a wheel; 9-8-7-3-A is not, because there really is no place to break. 4) In high-low split-pot games with a declare, a hand that can declare (but not necessarily win) both ways. 5) In high-low split-pot games without a declare (that is, those in which cards speak), a hand that wins both ways.

Two-Way Joint


A crooked gaming establishment. Also called flat joint, flat shop, flat store.

Two-Way Straight


In draw poker played with the 52-card deck, an open-ended straight; so called because it can be made by two ranks.

Uncalled Bet


In any round of betting, a bet made by one player that is not matched by any other player (nor is any other player all in, which would still necessitate a showdown), thus giving the pot to the player who made the bet.

Uncounterfeitable


In a high-low game with community cards (as Omaha or hold 'em), describing a nut low hand that still makes a nut low (the lowest possible hand based on the cards showing.) if one (after the turn) or two (on the flop) of the active low cards are duplicated.

Under Pair


In hold 'em, a player's pair lower than any card among the community cards.

Under the Gun


The first player to act after the blind bets is said to be under the gun.

Under the Guns


The first player to act after the blind bets is said to be under the gun.

Underbet


In a big bet game, make a bet smaller than one ordinarily might or than the situation calls for, sometimes in the hopes of enticing a raise (when one has a "monster") and sometimes to keep from having to call a larger bet if one passed instead of betting.

Undercall


At the showdown, declare your hand as being worse than it is. Many card rooms, particularly in California, have a penalty for overcalling a hand, where they rule that if a player miscalls his hand as being better than it is, causing another player to discard his hand, he may lose claim to the pot; that is, the verbal announcement takes precedence over the actual cards. There is no penalty for under calling a hand, but, except for accidentally, it is usually done only to needle another player by making that player briefly think she has the winner.

Undercut


1) Suffer an occurrence in low-hole-card-wild stud games in which a player's last down card is lower than his current lowest card, thus lowering the value of his hand. 2) Shuffle the deck in a cheating fashion, consisting of moving a prearranged packet from the bottom to the top of the deck, to produce a stacked deal

Underdog


A person or hand who is not mathematically favored to win a pot. Ant: Favorite.

Underfull


Any full house other than that special hand known as big full, that is, three aces and two kings.

Underplay


In a big bet game, make a bet smaller than one ordinarily might or than the situation calls for, sometimes in the hopes of enticing a raise (when one has a "monster") and sometimes to keep from having to call a larger bet if one passed instead of betting.

Under-Raise


To raise less than the previous bet; allowed only if a player is going all-in.

Under-the-Gun Blind


A traveling blind game in which the first player to the dealer's left blinds the pot.

Undress.


In draw poker, an exhortation, by the dealer, for the players to discard and reveal how many cards they're drawing.

Unglued


On tilt (Playing poorly and irrationally due to emotional upset, often caused by the player in question having had a good hand beat by a freak draw from another player (often in complete disregard of the odds and good play) or the player having lost a pot because of his own bad play. Also called steaming, having one's nose open, opened up, unglued and being wide open.); usually preceded by come. "He just came unglued after he had pocket aces beat for the second time by the same live one."

Union Oil


1) In lowball, a 7-6 hand; so called because a lowball hand is often expressed as a two-digit number composed of the top two cards of the hand, so a 7-6 can be called a 76. 2) In high, two pair, 7s and 6s. 3) In hold 'em, a 7 and 6 as one's first two cards.

Unit


1) A fixed betting quantity, usually equal to the size of the betting limit for the game. 2) $1000. "I'm stuck a unit."

Unlimited Poker


No limit (A poker game in which players can bet as much as they have in front of them on any given round.)

Unlimited Rebuy Tournament


A re-buy tournament in which players are permitted to re-buy as often as they wish, generally only during a certain period of time, as the first hour, the first three levels, etc

Unload


While cheating, get rid of unwanted cards, as drop them in one's lap, dispose of them in the discards, and so on.

Unmade Hand


In draw poker (high and low), a potentially winning hand that needs a good draw to become strong. Without a favorable draw, the hand is a probable loser.

Unmarked Cards


A deck that has no markings, and presumably cannot be used for cheating (at least not by virtue of any marks).

Unpaid Shill


A player who plays in few pots, and when he does, makes small bets and rarely raises, basically just plays along, apparently trying to last as long as possible. Also, a player who is the first to get into a given game, and the last to leave.

Unpat


Draw out on someone's pat hand (usually in high draw poker). "No cards, huh? Let's see if I can unpat you

Up


Designates the higher card of a hand consisting of two pair. Thus, "Queens up" refers to two pair, of which the higher pair is queens and the lower pair is unspecified.

Up Card


An open card, a card dealt face-up.

Up for


Having one's name on the list (the board) for a particular game. "Are you up for the 20?"

Up Front


Pertaining to an early betting position. "He came out swinging up front," in a no-limit game, means that the first bettor made a large bet, and implies the bet was made with no hesitation.

Up Jumped the Devil!.


1) A player says this in draw poker or lowball, usually when drawing one card and turning that card face up for the table to see, and that card (presumably) makes the hand. Comes from craps, where it is used in the situation in which a player sevens out. 2. Sometimes a player says this when catching the joker (or hoping to).

Up Scope!.


I raise.

Up the Slope!.


I raise"; sometimes "Up the slope went the antelope.

Up to


Pertaining to the person whose turn it is to bet; often followed by a pronoun or the name of a player. "Who's it up to?" "It's up to Pete." A card room homily goes, "It's always up to the person who says, `Who's it up to?'"

Uphill


Fighting the odds; usually preceded by go. "You're going uphill whenever you're in a pot with him."

Ups


In high (draw, usually), the top pair in a two-pair hand. If two players have two pair, one might say, "What are your ups?" wanting to know whether the other has, for example, aces up, or kings up.

Upstairs!.


"I raise"; sometimes preceded by going

Utah


Another name for Cincinnati (A form of poker found only in home games, a widow game in which each player receives five cards face down, as does a central area of the table, followed by a round of betting, and then the dealer turns up each central card, one at a time, each followed by another round of betting. At the showdown, each player uses the best five cards among his five and those of the widow. The game is often played high-low split. Also called Utah, Lamebrains, or California. Southern Cross is a variant of Cincinnati.).

Utility Bet


A bet made by a player who is unsure of the precise main benefit of the bet, yet knows the bet has a positive expectation, that is, the bet might cause the player to prosper in any one of several ways. For instance, he might bet knowing his opponent could throw the better hand away, or his opponent could throw away a hand that is not better now but can draw out on him easily, or his opponent might call with the worst of it

Valet


Jack (the card); comes from French

Valle Card


Any 3, 5, or 7; comes from the game of panguingue, in which those cards have value (which is the meaning of the word valle) and for which other players pay a player who melds them

Value


1) Getting paid off for a good hand (by someone who calls); often part of the phrase full value. A player in a lowball game who holds a pat bicycle, and busts three other players with it because of the way the action comes down, might say that he got value out of the hand. If he was not prone to understatement, he might even say that he got full value out of the hand. 2) The worth of a hand in comparison with its chances of winning. 3) Value means the return you get on your investment; the expected increase in your equity in the pot (your return), as compared to the size of your bet or raise (your investment).

Value Bet


Bet for value (Betting in order to raise the amount in the pot, not to make your opponents fold.).

Variance


Variance is the statistical measure of just how widely your results will be dispersed. If you have a sufficient advantage at the game you're playing, you expect to make money over the long haul. This is true whether the game is poker, blackjack, or craps, and whether your advantage is due to skill, cheating, or psychic powers.

Verbal Bet


A wager made by announcing the size of the bet but without actually putting any chips or money in the pot. In some (not all) establishments, oral declarations made in turn are binding; nonetheless, cautious players wait till the chips are actually in the pot before either calling the bet or showing their hands.

Verbal Declaration


A statement made by a player on his turn of his intentions: pass, fold, bet, or raise (and, in a no-limit game, how much). Also called verbal declaration.

Vest Holdout


A kind of holdout machine (A mechanical device enabling thieves to surreptitiously hold out. Holdout machines used to be more popular many years ago, but are not often seen now, probably because thieves are becoming more sophisticated, and also because being caught with one is dangerous.). A vest holdout is worn under a thief's coat. Also called breastworks.

Victory Rip


In a draw game, at the showdown, spreading your hand triumphantly. (It's usually done in the same manner that a blackjack or poker dealer spreads an entire deck fanned face up on the table in front of her. Spreading one's hand in this fashion, by the way, is something of a needle, and is not practiced by a refined player, who, when he has an obvious powerhouse, gently and diffidently turns it face up on the table.)

Victory Roll


In a draw game, at the showdown, spreading your hand triumphantly. (It's usually done in the same manner that a blackjack or poker dealer spreads an entire deck fanned face up on the table in front of her. Spreading one's hand in this fashion, by the way, is something of a needle, and is not practiced by a refined player, who, when he has an obvious powerhouse, gently and diffidently turns it face up on the table.)

Video Poker


The game played on a video poker machine.

Video Poker Machine


A computerized slot machine (video slot machine) based on draw poker (but not really a form of poker), with card symbols, on which players try to make certain poker hand combinations, a casino game that can sometimes be beaten by skill, the fastest-growing form of mechanized gambling.

Vig


House take; Also time, rake.

Vigorish


House take; Also time, rake.

Village People


Four queens.

Wager


1) Any bet. 2) To Make a bet.

Wages


What many professionals consider the minimum they should make per day, perhaps $100, or some multiple thereof. "How'd you do today?" "I made wages." That might mean the replier won $100

Wait


Make no bet, but still hold your cards. You can check, and then call a later bet, fold when the action gets back to you, or raise. Technically, to check is to make a bet of nothing.

Wait for the Blind


Some clubs do not let a new player (new to the particular game) be dealt in until it is his turn to put in the blind, supposedly to prevent his getting any "free" hands. (Also, if a seated player has missed the blind in a particular round, he can receive his next hand only in the blind position.) In such a case, a player must come in on the blind, or, if not in the big blind position, over blind or post to receive a hand; otherwise, he must wait for the blind

Waiter


One who checks. (Make no bet, but still hold your cards. You can check, and then call a later bet, fold when the action gets back to you, or raise. Technically, to check is to make a bet of nothing.)

Waiting in the Weeds


The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds.

Waiting in the Woods


The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds.

Wake Up with a Hand


To be dealt a hand with winning potential.

Walk


1) An unopened pot won by the blind (the largest blind, if there are more than one). 2) An uncalled pot won by the opener. 3) Be away from the table long enough to miss several hands. Sometimes card rooms try to prevent excessive walking with a third person walking rule.

Walk Over


Cheat, particularly at cards or dice.

Walker


One who leaves a poker table for extended periods of time, or, sometimes, just someone away from a table (for example, to have a smoke break or eat a meal).

Walkers


Players who walk frequently away from the table. Such people, and/or people who do so frequently, are called walkers. Depending on local conditions, walkers may be off getting food, smoking, playing craps, or waiting for more fish to sit down. Most card rooms have well-defined but poorly enforced rules about walkers - i.e., that a player's chips may be picked up (by the house, that is) after they've been gone for some specific amount of time. Too many walkers at a table can cause it to break, often through an unfortunate chain reaction. Once one or two players get up from the table, it makes it more likely for others to walk, or just leave.

Walking Chips


Winnings. "He's got lobbying chips" means, simply, "He's winning." So called because generally winners lobby, not losers. The losers have to concentrate on playing to get even; the winners can afford to relax and sit out a few hands.

Wangdoodle


In private or home games, a hand or round in which the stakes are temporarily increased, usually after a "big" hand is shown down.

Wangdoodles


In private or home games, a hand or round in which the stakes are temporarily increased, usually after a "big" hand is shown down.

Wash


1) Scramble (Thoroughly mix the deck while it is face-down on the table by spreading the cards over a large area, a move sometimes made by a dealer prior to actually shuffling the cards in traditional fashion. Sometimes this extra time taken mixing the cards is done at the request of a player.). 2) Less commonly, the term just means shuffle.

Wash Cards


Clean plastic cards, which are designed to be reusable, with special solvent.

Washington Monument


Three 5s; so called because the Washington Monument is 555 feet high

Watchmacallits


The nuts (Best possible hand); usually preceded by the

Wave


1) Put waving into cards (A method of marking cards in which the thief bends key cards around his finger such that the resultant waved cards can be identified in another player's hand or in the deck). 2) A slight bend in a card, for cheating purposes.

Waved Cards


A method of marking cards in which the thief bends key cards around his finger such that the resultant waved cards can be identified in another player's hand or in the deck (when being dealt or for the purpose of cutting to a particular point in the deck). Bending cards is also called crimping, although that usually puts a more pronounced bend into cards than waving. Crimping often involves bending corners.

Waving


A method of marking cards in which the thief bends key cards around his finger such that the resultant waved cards can be identified in another player's hand or in the deck (when being dealt or for the purpose of cutting to a particular point in the deck). Bending cards is also called crimping, although that usually puts a more pronounced bend into cards than waving. Crimping often involves bending corners.

Weak


1) A style of play characterized by a readiness to fold and a reluctance to raise. 2) Weak is also used to generally describe a poor player or a table that's easy to beat.

Weak Hand


A hand with low probability of winning a given pot.

Weak Player


One who plays timidly or no aggressively, and probably loses for that reason.

Weak-Passive


Describing a player who calls a lot and rarely raises, or the play of such a player.

Wedges


A deck marked by shaving the long edges of some cards such that they are wider towards their ends, so that a thief can tell by feel the values of certain cards, usually certain high or low cards, such as the aces, or pull those cards by feel from the deck.

Weed


Reclaim money from a shill who is winning.

Weeds


The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds.the terms in the woods and waiting in the woods.

Weinberg


In hold 'em, T-3 as one's first two cards.

Whack the Pack


Cut the deck. After shuffling, a player who considers himself clever may hand the cards to the cutter and say, "Whack the pack, Jack."

Whangdoodle


In private or home games, a hand or round in which the stakes are temporarily increased, usually after a "big" hand is shown down.

Whangdoodles


In private or home games, a hand or round in which the stakes are temporarily increased, usually after a "big" hand is shown down.

Wheel


1) A-2-3-4-5. Usually discussed in the context of lowball where it is the best possible hand. 2) Can also refer to a 5-high straight in high games. Also: BICYCLE.

Wheel Card


In ace-to-five lowball, any ace, 2, 3, 4, or 5. Also called spoke.

Whipsaw


Perform the action of two players who keep raising and re-raising each other, while one player between them keeps having to call further bets to remain in the pot. This can happen in a high-low game in which one player has an excellent high, another thinks he has a lock on low, and a third is trying to make a hand that he thinks will beat one or both of them. While a whipsaw situation may be quite honest, it sometimes also involves collusion between the raisers for the purpose of extracting the maximum from the sandwiched player. To prevent this sort of situation, most card rooms limit the number of raises in any one round in limit games. Comes from the action of two men wielding a whipsaw (a large, two-handled crosscut saw) to cut down a tree. Also called crossfire, sandwich, squeeze.

Whiskey Poker


A widow game, usually played only in home games by players while waiting for a "real" poker session to start. Each player receives five cards face down and five cards (the widow) are dealt face down in the center of the table. The player to the left of the dealer has three choices: knock, pass, or exchange his cards for the widow. If he passes, the next player has the same three choices. When any player exchanges his cards for the widow, the next player can discard anywhere from one to five of his cards, select cards (without looking at them) from the widow as replacements, and put his replacements in the widow. Once someone has taken the widow, players may no longer pass: they must either knock or exchange one or more cards with cards from the widow. If no one exchanges on the first round, the dealer turns the widow face up, and play continues as before, with cards this time drawn from the face-up cards of the widow. If a player feels that he has the best poker hand at any point when it is his turn, he can knock. At such point, play continues for one more round until just before the player who knocked, at which point there is a showdown. If his hand is indeed best, he collects one chip (or some other agreed-upon amount) from each player; if it is not, he loses two chips (or, again, some other agreed-upon amount) to the player whose hand beats his. Sometimes the lowest hand at the showdown then buys everyone drinks (whence the name of the game). Obviously (or not so obviously), the further the game progresses without someone knocking, the better the hand needed to knock. Several variations exist to this game; the preceding description is the most common.

Whisky Poker


Whiskey poker.

White


White is the most common color for $1 chips.

White Blackbird


A hand so astonishingly rare as to be unworthy of the opponents' consideration, e.g., being dealt a pat royal flush in 5-card draw

White Chip


1) A $1 chip, in many card rooms and casinos. (In some card rooms, the white chips are worth $100.) 2) Sometimes any small-denomination chip.

White Meat


Profit. "Yeah, I've got $1000 here, but only $100 is white meat."

White on White


A form of daub, or cosmetics, that uses white paint, and can be seen only at a certain angle.

Whiteskin


A 10 or less, that is, any card not a face card.

Whore


Queen (the card). This usage is considered vulgar.

Whorehouse Cut


A form of cut in which the cutter holds the cards in one hand, removes the bottom half with the other and places them atop the remaining half, pulls a packet from the center and places those cards on top of the remaining cards. This cut is named after John Scarne, who lectured and wrote about gambling thieves, and introduced this form of cut as a means of foiling cheaters who had stacked the deck. The Scarne cut is not permitted in most public card rooms, where the deck must not be lifted from the table and must be cut with one hand.

Wide Open


On tilt (Playing aggressively). "He just had a pat 7 beat and now he's wide open."

Widow


One or more community cards dealt to the center of the table in stud poker played in home games only and available to be part of any player's hand, sometimes with one or more of those cards being wild. Such games include Cincinnati, Southern Cross, wild widow, and many others.

Widow Cards


Cards that constitute a widow (One or more community cards dealt to the center of the table in stud poker played in home games only and available to be part of any player's hand, sometimes with one or more of those cards being wild.).

Widow Game


A stud game with a widow (One or more community cards dealt to the center of the table in stud poker played in home games only and available to be part of any player's hand, sometimes with one or more of those cards being wild.).

Widow Poker


A cross between draw poker and stud poker with one or more community cards.

Wild


Pertaining to a card that can take the value of any other card, as deuces wild or low hole card wild. A wild card turns a pair into three-of-a-kind, two pair into a full house, four to a straight into a straight, and so on.

Wild Annie


A form of poker, a cross between draw and stud. Each player starts with three cards; there is a round of betting; each player receives another card; another round of betting; each player receives a fifth card; another round of betting; then each player draws cards as in draw poker; then each player exposes one card; another round of betting; further cards are exposed, each followed by a round of betting, until each player has but one card face down. The game is played high-low split, and, prior to the showdown, there is a chip declaration. This game has eight rounds of betting, or nine if there is a bet after the declare, and is generally played only in home games. It is sometimes called Texas Tech.

Wild Card


A joker or standard card that, by player agreement and/or dealer's choice, can be used to represent any card desired.

Wild Widow


A form of spit in the ocean, in which one card is dealt face-up in the center, which rank is then wild in anyone's hand, but which card is not part of anyone's hand. Also called pig in the poke, toad in the hole.

Wildcard Games


A wildcard is a card that can take on any value, usually the value of a card you need to make the best poker hand. Wildcard games are very popular among friendly neighborhood poker games. If "deuces" are wild then every deuce in the deck can take on any value. If you have three aces and a deuce, then you can declare the deuce to "be" an ace and you automatically have four of a kind. In games like baseball, 3's and 9's are wild, which means that there are 8 wild cards in the deck - usually resulting in four of a kind or a straight flush.

Window


1) Window card. (The front card of the five in a draw poker hand, when the cards are squared together such that only one can be seen. Also door card.)2) The window position in a hand. "I can see what he's got in the window." Also door. 3) A, usually, glass-enclosed opening into the cage through which the cage person conducts transitions, and thus, by extension, the cage itself. "Did you make it to the window?" means "Did you escape from that game with any chips?"

Window Card


The front card of the five in a draw poker hand, when the cards are squared together such that only one can be seen. Also door card.

Window Dressing


Putting a card in the window (opening into the cage through which the cage person conducts transitions) for deceptive purposes.

Wing


Have a winning streak.

Winner


1) Pertaining to winner blind, and almost always followed by a number designating the size of the blind. This variation of blinding is most frequently found in draw games, but is also seen in no-limit hold 'em. Winner eight, for example, means the winner of this pot must leave $4 for the next pot, making the next hand $8-limit (in a limit game) or $8 minimum bet (in a no-limit game). Usually each winner in a winner game blinds for the same amount.

Winner Blind


A blind game in which the winner of the last pot leaves chips representing a blind in the current pot; these chips are the same as any blind, that is, they are counted as part of the bet of the player who has that blind. In draw games, the winner of the previous pot bets last in the pre-draw betting round. This sort of blind is a dead blind, as opposed to a live blind, because whoever wins it doesn't get to keep it. Also, leave it.

Winner Kill


A blind game in which the winner of the last pot leaves chips representing a blind in the current pot; these chips are the same as any blind, that is, they are counted as part of the bet of the player who has that blind. In draw games, the winner of the previous pot bets last in the pre-draw betting round. This sort of blind is a dead blind, as opposed to a live blind, because whoever wins it doesn't get to keep it. Also, leave it.

Winner Leave it


A blind game in which the winner of the last pot leaves chips representing a blind in the current pot; these chips are the same as any blind, that is, they are counted as part of the bet of the player who has that blind. In draw games, the winner of the previous pot bets last in the pre-draw betting round. This sort of blind is a dead blind, as opposed to a live blind, because whoever wins it doesn't get to keep it. Also, leave it.

Winning Hand


The best hand at the showdown; the hand that takes the pot.

Winning Streak


In the midst of winning a series of hands, or a period of time during which a player wins more than her share of hands. Also, hot streak, rush.

Winning Tickets


Cards that win a pot.

Wire Joint


A crooked card-room or gambling establishment. Also called juice joint.

Wired


1) A pair in the hole in seven card stud is a wired pair. 2) "Wired" can also describe someone who's had a few gallons of coffee trying to stay alert through an all- night poker game.

Wired Pair


1) A pair in the hole. 2) In 5-card stud, a door card that pairs the hole card.

Wood


A non-playing spectator; a railbird.

Wooden Bottoms


Cards dealt from the bottom of the deck in amateurish, easy-to-detect fashion.

Wooden Hand


A hand that cannot improve or that cannot possibly win. Comes from deadwood, a term for the discards.

Woods


The place where sneaky poker players lie in wait, usually accompanied by powerhouse hands they have sandbagged, or otherwise slow-played, to trap unwary aggressive players; often part of the phrase waiting in the weeds or lying in the weeds.

Woolly Bear


The nuts (Best possible hand); usually preceded by a.

Woolworth


1) In lowball, a 10-5 hand. 2) In high, two pair, 10s and 5s. 3) In hold 'em, a 10 and 5 as one's first two cards. 4) Any game in which 10s and 5s are wild. 5) A nonstandard hand sometimes given value in a private or home game, five cards 5 to 10 with no pair, which ranks above three of a kind and below a straight. For all definitions 1 to 4, also called dime store; for definitions 2 and 3 only, sometimes also called dime stores. Comes from the F. W. Woolworth retail chain, individual stores of which were often called five-and-ten-cent stores or five-and-dime stores (and often shortened to dime stores).

Woppitzer


Someone with body odor or bad breath who hangs around card games (on the outside), often offering gratuitous advice and unwanted opinions, commenting on the play, and generally being obnoxious and the worst kind of kibitzer.

Work


Cards altered for cheating purposes; marked cards.

Work the Broads


Cheat at cards, particularly three-card monte.

Working the Telegraph


Cheating by sending prearranged signals, say by finger positions similar to the "signing" used by the hearing impaired, or by certain code words and phrases embedded within seemingly ordinary conversation, of a victim's hand to the signaler's confederate.

World Series of Poker


A series of several different poker games with relatively large buy-ins, culminating in a $10,000 buy-in no-limit Hold'em tournament, the winner of which is crowned the World Poker Champion. Sponsored by Binion's Horseshoe Club in Las Vegas.

World's Fair


A big hand.

Worst Likely Hand


The worst holding you might put another player on.

Worst of it


Fighting the odds; usually preceded by take the or have the; a situation in which a wager has an unfavorable return. Opposite of best of it.

Wraparound


In Omaha, a situation in which your four down cards consist of three consecutive cards, which combine with two cards of the flop to form five consecutive cards, so that a large number of cards on the turn or river give you a straight.

Wring in


A variant spelling of ring in (To substitute a prearranged deck for the one that is supposed to be dealt.); usually followed by a deck

WSOP


World Series of Poker.

Wurlitzer


1) In lowball, a pair of 8s (that is, 88; comes from the number of keys on the instrument). 2) In hold 'em, 8-8 as one's two starting cards.

X


$10. Comes from the Roman numeral.

X Marks the Spot


A variant of Southern Cross, played only in home games, in which each player is dealt five cards face down, and five cards are dealt face down in the center, in the form of a cross, forming three vertical and three horizontal cards, with each player allowed to combine any of the widow cards together with his original cards in forming a five-card hand. The widow cards are turned up one at a time, with the center card turned up last, each followed by a betting round. The center card and others of the same rank are wild. Also called criss-cross.

Yard


$100.00

Yeast


Raise. "Let's give it a little yeast" means "I raise."

Yo


11, in respect to the size of a bet. Probably comes from craps dealers who pronounce the word clearly, loudly, and distinctly to distinguish amid all the casino noise from the similar sounding seven. Often they drag it out to eeyoleven, and this is sometimes shortened to eeyo.

You Roll Two


A form of seven-card stud, found exclusively in home games, in which each player receives four cards face down, turns any two up, and then the betting commences.

Younger Hand


An obsolete term for any player to the left of the eldest hand (that is, the one immediately to the left of the dealer).

Youngest Hand


An obsolete term for the player immediately to the right of the dealer.

Z-Game


The smallest game in a card room or casino. Opposite of A-game.

Zip


In lowball, 4-3-2-A; always preceded by the rank of the highest card in the hand. For example, 8-zip is 8-4-3-2-A. Also, -nothing.

Zombie


A poker player with no tells, one who has a poker face, shows no emotion, and otherwise exhibits no behavior to give away his holdings.

Zuke


Toke (Gambling term for "tip", as in "Toke the cocktail waitress". Comes from the term "Token of appreciation". A small amount of money (typically $.50 or $1.00) is given to the dealer by the winner of a pot. Quite often, tokes represent the great majority of a dealer's income.). This term is generally used only by dealers.



Complete list of specific games we cover in our dictionary of gambling slang and terminology

:

Baccarat terms

,

Bingo terms

,

Blackjack terms

,

Craps terms

,

General terms

,

Greyhound Racing terms

,

Horse Racing terms

,

Keno terms

,

Poker terms

,

Roulette terms

,

Slots terms


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